and everest

Sage zu allen, dass ich Dich nicht vermiss’ , obwohl ich so Angst habe, dass Du mich vergisst.
—  Metrickz ~ Everest

My contribution to Humans Being the Weird Ones:

Humans don’t just explore to expand territory or further science. They go places just to be able to say they did it. Aliens cannot possibly understand how humans risk what they call ‘altitude sickness’ (most aliens call it the body shutting down, actually) to scale the highest peak of their planet. 

They do it, reportedly, simply to say they did. It’s not even a competition, as most things the humans do seem to be. it is done ‘for funzies.’

This leads to the federation finding a whole lot of useless facts about planets they have virtually ignored. Though the scanners read nothing useful or even mildly interesting, the humans want to go down and explore. It’s uninhabitable. Possibly unstable. There in no valuable ore, no scientific questions, but the science team insists. 

The aliens shrug and allow them to explore. Occasionally, they somehow they come back with ancient technology, a host of scraps and bruises, and three different animals that literally cannot exist.

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33890 by Clive Nichols
Via Flickr:

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The daily sea of clouds that rushes up the valley in the Khumbu Himalaya towards the highest point on earth. Shot from the summit of Lobuche peak while acclimatizing for an ascent of Everest in order to document it from the Sherpa perspective. ~

These days many western climbers sleep on this safe neighboring peak while the Sherpas and other high altitude Nepali workers take the lions share of the risk carrying equipment up and down the dangerous Khumbu icefall.

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Animal Kingdom - Shadow of the Mountain by Jeff Krause

Loving you has been no small feat. It’s no different than someone climbing Mount Everest, hoping to make it to the top and aching with every step they take. But I keep going even knowing this could break me, as much as it’s put me back together. And if I ever get myself to the peak I know I’ll either enjoy the view, soaking in all the beauty that remains.. or I’ll let out a deep sigh, look down below with tears in my eyes and jump from the ledge.
—  Excerpt from a book I’ll never write #63

Jake Gyllenhaal is underappreciated.

This man is such an important human being. Watch interviews and observe how he interacts with the interviewer, he looks right into their eyes and actually ponders the questions he is asked. Jake chooses very diverse roles in films and gives a phenomenal performance each time, because he embraces that character and dedicates so much time to create an accurate portrayal. From being a bubble boy, to a troubled teen, to a sociopath, to a gay cowboy, to a widowed father. Jake Gyllenhaal never gives a disappointing performance. Watch how charming, respectful, witty, and polite he is. Watch how accepting he is, and how supportive he is. Look at the way his blue eyes light up when he talks about his family and how highly he speaks of each member, never once saying anything negative. Look at how he respectfully shuts interviewers down when they bring up sex scenes, and how he always comments on a woman’s personality before her body. Especially look at how he doesn’t act like he can get any girl he wants. Listen to his beautiful, genuine laugh. Think about how he always tries to be the best at everything he does. This is a man that would rather work alongside Robert Downey Jr. than win an award because gaining knowledge means he is successful, not recieving awards. This actor is slipping under everybody’s radar and I’m finding it quite beautiful because I get to embrace his excellence while everyone else is gawking over Channing Tatum’s body.

Day 5 - Dingboche

I forgot the wonders of a hiking group. People to make you laugh when you’re down and push you to keep going when it’s tough and you fall behind and you’re so tired and have no energy left in your muscles.
Enter Ollie (Nz), Kelsey and Ashley (USA) and there guide Mingmar. We met in the guesthouse and decided to hike together much to the disappointment of their guide.
I would say usually a guide wouldn’t want random trekkers clinging on to his group, but especially when those random trekkers are super sick and may need to get saved at some point.

Today was the day of Mordor. We began trekking through a new zealand-esue landscape, but eventually we made it above the tree line into a barren, cold, beautiful wasteland. Falling rocks, evidence of landslides littering the landscape.

The altitude was kicking in, luckily it was a slow steady incline for most of the day, nothing too drastic. But every ascent left me breathless. Followed by yet another coughing fit and another and another.
The others were fit and healthy AND they had a porter. I looked in jealousy at there tiny backpacks and there long legs speeding off into the distance.
I had to come to terms with the fact that I was the slow one. Not because I kept stopping to take photos (like on the Annapurna) but because my body wouldn’t let me go any faster.
Anyone that knows me, knows this would kill me inside. I’m highly competitive and grew up wanting to prove that I can do anything a boy, or a larger human can do. I am never the slow one.
As I was plodding along, slowly falling further behind, I spotted a sharp incline. ‘Oh shit’ my lungs whimpered.
But just as I felt my mood drop I spotted a familiar face waiting at the bottom of the incline. Ol’ mate bobby hot shakes. You may remember him from such hikes as the Annapurna Circuit.
He’d started the hike 2 days before me but he decided he wanted his old hiking buddy back and he waited around for me (plus he’d needed an extra rest day for acclimatisation)
Elated, I basically ran down and ascended, not so much with ease, but definitely with less pain than first anticipated.

We arrived in town at the same time as a cloud. So much hiking, so much pain and I’d hardly seen any snowy peaks.

It hit 9pm, my eyes were burning with tiredness, my body ached. I climbed into bed expecting to fall straight asleep but the altitude had different ideas.
I tossed and turned, coughing constantly until 5am when I finally managed to fall asleep. The whole time questioning every aspect of my life and travels. Wondering if I am in fact the strong lass I always thought I was. Will I make it up to base camp? I’ve hardly taken any photos on this hike, am I even a good photographer? Should I just quit and go home where mum will look after me and get me healthy?



I woke up at 9am to a blue sky, unexpectedly sweating in bed (we’re well over 4400m here). Not ideal due to the fact I won’t be showering or washing my clothes up here. (Yes boys, I am single ;) )
My filthy hair is matted over my face adding to the incredibly attractive picture I have obviously created. I feel like a truck has ran over my face but I finally have a view of snowy peaks outside my window!