and as individual characters

ew.com
'Power Rangers' Director Explains Why Romantic Scene Didn't Make Final Cut
Love was in the air for a pair of Power Rangers — until test audiences said no.

They cut a heterosexual romance because it didn’t fit the story, and because including it did a disservice to the female character’s individual narrative arc.

sorry but your faves literally would never

never

wynonna earp, a show that stood up against the bury your gays trope, just got renewed for season 3. wynonna earp, a show that wrote in its lead actress’ pregnancy in order to demonstrate that pregnant women can still be badass, just got renewed for season 3. wynonna earp, a show that portrays its gay characters as individuals with their own struggles whilst not ignoring their relationships, just got renewed for season 3. wynonna earp, a show that respects and understands its audience, just got renewed for season 3.

Tatiana Maslany plays 10+ characters - each with specific vocal registers, accents, body movements, and rhythms. She has spoken English, German, French, and Ukrainian. She played four characters in a six character scene. She utilized music to create individual heartbeats and internal rhythms for her characters. She understands what they love and what they fear. I am in awe. I will always be in awe.

Color Reference Guide to Recognize & Avoid Whitewashing

I’ve made a tutorial on how to color adjust to fix washed out coloringsbut I noticed people aren’t always sure when their coloring needs fixing in the first place. So I’ve made a bunch of colorings you can use to compare your own to. It’s designed to help avoid whitewashing, but also help avoid over-correction.

If you’re not a content creator, you can also use this guide for reblogging as well. :)

Using the Guide

  • Each set comes in three: cool, neutral, and warm. If your coloring is bluer/whiter than the cool tone, consider readjusting.
  • Examples of what might be too pale/bright are beneath each set
  • There are various categories (daytime, night scenes, etc) for each type of scene you might encounter
  • Each coloring has a color palette beneath for the highlights, midtones, and shadows of the character’s face. If you’re having trouble eyeballing it, use the eyedropper tool to double check.

NOTES
1) For the sake of simplicity, I’ve used one character per category, but characters of color are not interchangeable. Identify the skin tone for the character you’re coloring and work with that. This is only meant to give a frame of reference for what is and isn’t whitewashing

2) If any of the colorings look different than what they’ve been stated as (i.e. the cool tones look too warm or some look way too dark to be visible) calibrate your monitor. It means your screen color and gamma needs readjustment.

Guide itself is under the read more!

Keep reading

  • you: the defining moment of taz was when griffin said fuck it and changed an npc's name to barry bluejeans
  • me, an intellectual: the defining moment was when justin spelled out his character's name and the other three each individually sounded it out before griffin shouted "did you name your fucking character taco"
Important Facts About Yuri On Ice !!!

(all mentioned in the AnimeNEXT panels feat.
Takahiro Ogawa, Junpei Tatenaka, Noriko Ito, and
Izumi Hirose)

- Viktor and Yurio both have the iPhone 6plus and Yūri has the 6s
- Pichit is into Harajuku fashion.
- Takahiro Ogawa’s (animation producer) favorite character is Georgi.
- The difference in clothing color is frequently modified to fit the color scheme of the scene, also so it looks like the characters are not wearing the same clothing.
- The bottom left corner of the X on the shirt Yurio wore in his exhibition skate is slightly longer than all the other corners.
- The bolts on the bottom of each characters skates are customized to each individual character, showing their different skating styles.
- Each of the main characters have specialized eyes, Yurio has a green to blue gradient with blue shadow, Yūri has Brown with gray undertones, and Viktor has different tones of blue “like the sky”.
- The original sketches for Yūri’s Katsudon were rejected manytimes, the reason stated was because it needed more “Eros”
- Backgrounds for the different skating rinks are computer generated and the characters are drawn into the rink.

3

Resource Dump: Creating Characters!

Primary Characters

  • Your Hero: Top Ten Rules
  • 10 Traits of a Great Protagonist
  • 4 Steps to Creating a Truly Active Protagonist
  • 20 Tips for Creating Relatable Protagonists
  • How to Center your Story
  • How to Create Unforgettable Protagonists
  • 25 Things You Should Know About Protagonists
  • Creating Memorable Characters
  • Creating Strong Female Protagonists
  • Creating Dynamic Protagonists
  • How to Create Characters
  • Inner Dialogue - Writing Inner Character Thoughts
  • 25 Things a Great Character Needs
  • 5 Ways to Create 3D Characters

Secondary Characters

  • 10 Secrets to Creating Unforgettable Supporting Characters
  • How to Write Effective Supporting Characters
  • Question to Ask (& Strengthen) Your Minor Characters
  • 5 Tips for Developing Supporting Characters
  • Techniques for Creating Great Secondary Characters
  • 5 Steps to Dazzling Minor Characters
  • 3 Ways to Create Stupendous Supporting Characters
  • Creating Memorable Secondary Characters
  • 5 Archetypes for Supporting Characters
  • Your Map to Creating a Memorable Minor Characters

Names

  • Top Ten Tips
  • 8 Tips for Naming Characters
  • 7 Rules of Naming Fictional Characters
  • Name that Character!
  • 6 Creative Ways to Name your Character
  • Naming your Characters
  • A Guide to Naming Characters
  • Female: 1 | 2 | 3
  • Male: 1 | 2 | 3
  • Alien: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
  • Surname: 1 | 2 | 3 
  • Unisex: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4

Traits

  • List: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9
  • Developing Character Traits
  • How to Create Good Personalities for your Characters
  • Develop Memorable Personalities
  • Give your Character Personality
  • How to Create a Character’s Personality
  • How to Make Sure your Character’s Personality Shines
  • 5 Building Blocks of your Character’s Personality

Appearance

  • Appearance Generator
  • Your Character’s Physical Appearance
  • How to Describe a Character’s Looks
  • Describing a Character’s Appearance
  • Character Description Resource
  • Examples of Physical Characteristics
  • Describing the Physical Attributes of your Characters
  • How Great Authors Describe Character Appearance
  • Ultimate Guide to Nailing your Character’s Appearance
  • Describing Clothing and Appearance
  • Character Appearance Help
  • Character Description Resource
  • Describing People: A Person’s Physical Appearance
  • Describing the Physical Attributes of Characters

Speech

  • Talking About your Character: Speech
  • Variety in Character Voices
  • All your Characters Talk the Same
  • How to Create Distinctive Character Voices
  • How to Create Characters Who Don’t Sound like You
  • The Art of Voice in Fiction
  • Create Varying, Yet Realistic, Speech Patterns
  • The Art and Craft of Dialogue
  • Writing Character Voice
  • Creating Differences in the Speech Patterns of your Characters
  • Style: Person and Speech
  • Dialects: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

Backstory

  • Building Better Backstories
  • Basic Tips to Create Better Characters with Tragic Backstories
  • How to Write a Backstory
  • Writing Characters Using Conflict and Backstory
  • Backstory Description Generator
  • Questions to Create Character Backstory
  • How to Weave in Backstory to Reveal Character
  • Nail your Character’s Backstory
  • How to Write Backstory Without Putting your Reader to Sleep
  • How to Write a Killer Backstory

Diversity

  • How to Make Young Adult Fiction More Diverse
  • Writing People of Color
  • A Few Tips and Resources for Writing Characters of Colour
  • Writing Characters of Colour Tastefully
  • Writing With Colour
  • 7 Offensive Mistakes Well-Intentioned Writers Make
  • Writing Characters of Colour
  • Describing Characters of Colour

Gender

  • Female: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
  • Male: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
  • Transgender: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6
  • Non-Binary: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

Sexuality

  • Main Character Sexuality
  • On Writing LGBTQ Characters: 1 | 2
  • Writing Gay Characters
  • Guide to LGBT YA
  • Avoiding LGBTQ Stereotypes
  • Writing Bisexual Characters: 1 | 2
  • Writing Asexual Characters: 1 | 2
  • Pansexual & Demisexual Characters
  • How to Write Gay, Bisexual and Pansexual Characters

Introduction

  • Introducing a Character
  • Introducing your Main Character
  • Do’s and Don’ts for Introducing your Protagonist
  • First Impressions
  • How to Introduce a Character
  • How Not to Introduce a Main Character
  • Introducing the Protagonist

Development

  • Character Development
  • 9 Ingredients of Character Development
  • Characterisation 1 - Character Development
  • How to Develop a Character for a Story
  • Character Development
  • Character Development Drives Conflict
  • Developing your Characters and Making them Interesting

Relationships

  • How to Write Strong Character Relationships
  • Character Relationships
  • 3 Keys to Developing Character Relationships
  • The Secret Behind Great Character Relationships
  • 3 Tips for Character Relationships
  • Building Believable Relationships
  • Sibling: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4
  • Platonic: 1 | 2 | 3
  • Romantic: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

Strengths

  • Identifying your Character’s Strengths
  • Character Strengths and Weaknesses
  • Introducing the 24 Character Strengths
  • Character Strengths and Virtues List
  • Strengths and Weaknesses
  • A Balance of Strengths

Flaws

  • 123 Ideas for Character Flaws
  • DarkWorld RPG Flaws List
  • Character Flaws
  • Ten Ugliest Character Flaws
  • The Four Types of Character Flaws
  • On Giving Flaws and Weaknesses
  • Character Flaw Index

Goal

  • Why your Character’s Goal Needs to be 1 of these 5 Things
  • Goals Define the Plot
  • Goal Setting for You and your Character
  • How to Explore you Character’s Motivation
  • 4 Ways to Motivate Character and Plot
  • Motivation

By Genre

  • Fantasy: 1 | 2 | 3
  • Sci-Fi: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4
  • Romance: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4
  • Thrillers: 1 | 2 
  • Horror: 1 | 2 | 3

Heroes

  • Your Hero: Top Ten Rules
  • How to Write your Own Hero Story
  • What Makes a Great Hero?
  • Creating Heroes and Heroines
  • Write a Story about a Hero
  • How to Create an Antihero that Readers Love
  • Heroes vs. Anti-Heroes
  • Create a Super Hero
  • How to Create a Brand New Iconic Hero or Villain
  • What Makes a Hero

Villains

  • How to Create a Credible Villain in Fiction
  • How to Make a Purely Evil Villain Interesting
  • 9 Evil Examples of the Villain Archetype
  • How Not to Create a Villain
  • Creating Villains People Love to Hate
  • 3 Techniques for Crafting a Better Villain
  • Basic Tips to Write Better & More Despicable Villains
  • Writing Tips for Creating a Complex Villain
  • How to Create a Great Villain

Do’s & Don’ts

  • Do’s and Dont’s of Writing a Good Character
  • How to Create a Character
  • Characterisation Dos and Dont’s
  • Female Characters of Do’s and Dont’s
  • Do’s and Dont’s of Dialect

Helpful Writing Blogs

  • fuckyeahcharacterdevelopment*
  • writeworld
  • referenceforwriters
  • thewritingcafe
  • aquestionofcharacter *
  • writingwithcolor
  • fuckyeah-char-dev
  • dailycharacterdevelopment

Clichés

  • Characters and Cliches
  • Top 10 Character Cliches
  • 7 Lazy Character Cliches 
  • 10 Most Cliched Characters in Sci-Fi
  • Four Worst Character Cliches
  • Female Character Cliches
  • Character Cliches to Avoid
  • The Cliche Character Test
  • How Cliches Can Help You Make Great Characters

Templates

  • How to Create a Character Profile
  • Writing Character Bios
  • Character Sheets and Character Creation
  • Gender/Sexuality Generator
  • Extremely Detailed Character Template
  • Writer’s Resource: Character Template
  • Character Description

The Dregs | Six of Crows

Well here they are all together. It was a little trickier that I thought to group them up cohesively so I hope it looks alright. I knew I was gonna have them framed by crow wings but it kind of took a byzantine turn… I’m not entirely sure how that happened but I just decided to run with it. The words around them sum them up but at the same time kind of tell a five word story about their growth as characters. To see the individual portraits in better detail go here

anonymous asked:

Any advice on how to write a heist story something like oceans Eleven?

Well, you can start by watching Ocean’s Eleven, and Ocean’s Eleven, and then Leverage, and then Burn Notice, and then The A-Team, and then Mission: Impossible, and then all the other heist stories like The Italian Job or Heat. Watch, read, uncover as many stories about criminals as you can from fiction to nonfiction to reading security analyst blogs. Read the spy memoirs, the thief memoirs, the fake ones and the real ones. Check out magicians, hypnotists, card tricks, and sleight of hand. Watch the making ofs and director’s commentaries looking for clues behind the thought process of these stories. The hows and the whys as you look into the research they did. Burn Notice, for example, is famous for using stunt props and technological rigs that work in real life. Like using cell phones to create cheap bugs on the go.

The worlds of criminal fiction and spy fiction rely on being able to present (or convincingly fake) a world which feels real. A heist is all about exploitation. So, you need a world with security structures to exploit. You’ve got to know how things work before you can craft a way to break them. Social engineering, hacking, and every other criminal skill is about breaking the systems in place. So, you’ve got to get a baseline for how law enforcement and security analysts work. What security systems are set up to look like. The ways we go about discouraging thieves. Better yet how people behave. Real, honest to god human behavior.

So, you know, pick somewhere in order to start your research. Get an idea of what you want write about stealing, then learn everything about the object, the museum, the city, the country, and its customs as you can.

If you’re setting a heist in a futuristic or fantasy setting then luck you, you get to make all of it up.

Learning the plot structure and conventions of the heist genre is the first step. This means watching lots and lots of heist movies, shows, and reading books. Over time, as you become better at critical analysis, you’ll begin to see specific story structures and character archetypes emerge.

The Heist Story is a genre. Like every other genre, it comes with its own structure, cliches, archetypes, plots, and genre conventions which necessitate the narrative. The better grasp you have of those, the better you’ll be at writing a heist.

For example, a heist story like Ocean’s Eleven relies on a collection of thieves rather than a single individual. The character types are as follows:

The Pointman - Your planner, strategist, team leader, and the Jack of All Trades. Can also be called the Mastermind. They’re the one who can take the place of anyone on the team should they fall through. They’re not as good as a specialist, but they’re very flexible. Narratively, he plans the cons and subs in where he’s needed.

The Faceman - Your experienced Grifter, here for all your social engineering needs. These guys talk their way in.

The Infiltrator - Your cat burglar or break-in artist. Basically, the conventional genre thief. Your Parker, Catwoman, Sam Fisher, or Solid Snake. The stealth bastards, they’re all about silent in, out, and playing acrobatic games with the lasers.

The Hacker - The electronics and demolitions specialist. Usually this is the guy in the van overseeing stuff remotely. Your Eye in the Sky. Their skill set can be split up and swapped around as necessary.

The Muscle - The one who is good at fighting. They’re combat focused characters, usually with mercenary and special forces backgrounds. Though, that’s optional.

The Wheelman - The one who handles the getaway. They’re your often overlooked transport specialists. It’s not just that they can drive, they’re skilled at getting lots of people around, figuring out how to move your valuables, and exiting hostile cities or countries undetected. They get the team in and they get them out.

For an example of these archetypes, I’m going to use Leverage. Nathan Ford, The Pointman (technically, he’s written like a Faceman). Sophie Devereaux , The Faceman. Parker, the Infiltrator. Hardison, the Hacker. Eliot, the Muscle. They all take turns being the Wheelman.

Other examples like Burn Notice: Michael Westen, the Pointman. Sam Axe, the Faceman. Fiona, the Muscle. They all take turns with explosives, Michael will invariably take all the roles during the course of the show.

Ocean’s Eleven has multiple variants of these archetypes, all broken down and mixed up.

You can mix and match these qualities into different individuals or break them apart like in Ocean’s Eleven, and more than one character can fill more than one role, but that’s the basic breakdown. For example, your hacker doesn’t need to be a guy in a van overlooking the whole security grid. One guy or girl with a cell phone can sit in the lobby of a building with an unsecured wireless network and crack the security. Welcome to the 21st century. The skills don’t necessarily need to take the specific expected shape.

What you do need is the basic breakdown:  You need someone to plan the con, you need someone to be your face or grifter, you need someone to break in, you need someone to watch the security/electronics, you need muscle to back you up, and someone’s got to cover the getaway.

These shift depending on your plan, but this is the expected lineup for a heist narrative. The first step of a heist narrative is not the plan because we don’t have one yet. We’ve got an idea. Pick your target. Maybe it’s a famous painting. Maybe it’s a casino. Maybe it’s a rare artifact from a private investor’s collection loaned to a museum for a short period of time. Maybe it’s art stolen by the Nazis during WWII. Whatever it is, figure it out.

The next step is simple. If you want the thing, you’ve got to find a way to get it. This is a big job, your standard thief won’t be able to pull it off alone. So, you gotta go recruiting. Get your team together. Make sure to establish the goals of the different members for joining. Who they are. Their pedigree. One might be an old flame or an old enemy. This is where we lay out some character driven subplots.

When everyone’s together, we’ve got to lay out the plan. Before we have a plan though, we need to establish where the object is and the issues in getting it. Why this has never been done before. So, what are the challenges? Invariably, an object worth a great deal of money will have a lot of security protecting it. Figure out what that security is, who the item belongs to, what sort of retribution do the thieves face beyond what they might expect. Lasers, pressure plates, cameras, security, other career criminals, mob bosses, the rich and powerful, whatever.

After that: How do you get it? Then you’ve got to plan the con, while taking everything into account.

Then, We prep the Con. There will be steps to take before the con can be put into place, your characters taking their positions in plain sight. Stealing whatever pieces you need to make it work. Casing the joint. Etc.

Then: Run the Con. This is the part with the actual stealing. Better known as the first attempt. Things go well, there may be a few mistakes, but things are going well and then we…

Encounter Resistance. While running the con, something goes wrong, pieces fall apart, the thieves come close to success but the object gets moved and they suddenly need a new plan. New information may pop up, it may be one of your artists was running a con of their own separate from the rest. If there’s a double cross in the works then this may be when and where it lands.

We’re ready now, so it’s time hit up: Steal the Thing, Round Two. Your characters put their new plan into play and get about thieving the object of their desire.

Lastly: The Get Away. This is the part where your thieves make for the hills with their stolen treasure. This can be short or long depending on the kind of story you’re telling and other double crosses may occur here. It could be the end of the story or the beginning of a new heist.

Heist stories are like mystery novels. They’re all about sleight of hand and misdirection. You’ve got to keep just enough information on the table to keep your audience on the hook, and just enough information off the table to surprise them later on the twist. Yet, when they go back to re-read the novel again, they’ll find the answer was there all along. They just didn’t see it coming.

If anything, learning how to write a well-done heist or a mystery or any kind of novel in this genre will teach you a lot about how to manage your foreshadowing and create superb plot twists. Like any good con, you need to lay out all the conflicting pieces where people can see them, let them draw their own conclusions, withhold the critical context, and then hit them with the whammy.

Like lots of audiences, new writers (and even some old ones) can get distracted by the shock and awe. They see they’re impressed by the conclusion, not the lay-up. If you want to write any kind of fiction, you need to learn to see past the curtain and pay attention to the critical pieces leading into an important moment rather than the moment itself.

Good writing isn’t modular, you can’t just strip out pieces and run with them because you’ll end up missing the crucial, sometimes innocuous pieces that ensured the scene worked. Like the Victorian Hand Touch, every moment between the two leads and most of their scenes with secondary players are working for that singular instance of eventual, gleeful catharsis.

If you’ve got a plot twist coming in your novel, every sentence from the second you start writing is working towards it. You start laying out your pieces, funneling in your tricks, and playing with misdirection. You may have multiple twists, to cover yourself, divert your audience, congratulate them for successfully guessing your ploy, and reassure their initial suspicions before catching them again on the upswing.

The clever writer is as much a con artist as their characters. The only difference is the target of their con is their audience. The tricks in their bag are narrative ones, and they work with the understanding that it doesn’t matter if someone guesses the end so long as they’re entertained by the journey. A great story stays entertaining long after the audience has figured out all the twists.

So, don’t get caught up in Red Herrings and frightened about not being able to outsmart other people. Tell a good story with conviction and heart about a bunch of crooks out to steal their heart’s desire.

That’s all there is to it.

-Michi

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oh, shit, people actually asked me to follow up on Preaching The Good Word of A Functional Alignment System, okay

i hope you people know what you’re unleashing here

(whole thing prompted by this right here, notably including the tag #unpopular opinion: the definition of lawful and chaotic has been thoroughly twisted over the years since od&d)

So some of you (the ones who didn’t request this) might be wondering: “Alterz, why would you want to go back to the old alignment method? If people generally agree on the new alignment definitions then why confuse things by trying to change them? Is this just some old system nostalgia?”

Well 1) I’m too young by far for old system nostalgia but more importantly 2) people don’t? agree????? on the alignments???????

And that’s a problem, because the whole point of the alignments is to give some rough guidelines on how any given character is likely to act. It should be inarguable. The very fact that people can have arguments over what an alignment is means that the system has failed.

If you look in the alignment section on the more recent D&D editions, they literally have to go into detail on each alignment to explain what each one means. Worse still, for a system theoretically set up as a gradient, the different alignments are basically buckets and it gets really confusing if a character doesn’t neatly fit into one of those buckets.

Some examples from characters I have actually played: a mercenary who I labeled as neutral because I could make equally compelling arguments for why he should be lawful neutral, chaotic neutral, neutral good, and neutral evil. A hermit who at any given time was chaotic neutral or neutral good, but could never reliably be described as chaotic good.

Under the system I’m about to provide you, the mercenary is inarguably chaotic neutral and the hermit is unambiguously lawful good. End of sentence, all cleared up.

Keep reading

ok but i always believed ‘a song of ice and fire’ was just JON SNOW u know because he is the son of ice (lyanna stark) and fire (rhaegar targaryen) not as in jon snow is ice and daenerys is fire wtf is this some sort of YA mfeo romance? and rly no offense to YA romance fans but this just isn’t what i signed up for