ancient bird

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I used to love ancient Egyptian history in middle school so i decided it would be a good time to remember things and to also learn new things while drawing Fareeha! It’s a really rough comic but I thought it’d be fun to imagine Angela dabbling in more dangerous sciences and finding herself in front of an ancient version of Fareeha

maybe i’ll do more of this??

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Urartian Bronze Belt with Winged & Double-Headed Hybrid Creatures, 8th-6th Century BC

This bronze belt bears the strange images of winged sphinx-like and siren-like creatures with the heads of humans, horses, lions and other creatures. Some have the tail of a fish or bird while others have a ram’s head on the tail.

Bird Emoji Review

My dude @zaplayden​ and I couldn’t find a review of the Bird emoji so let’s do this

Pure evil.  Excessive gradients only intensify his evil intentions. There is no sweetness in this child of darkness. 0/5

This is a pure, sweet boy. Absolutely perfect bird child. 5/5

Ancient bird friend of legend. A little stiff and out of touch, but a very reliable friend.  4/5 I would trust this fellow. 

A lumpy bean friend. Kinda smells funny. Vacant stare. He’s a good boy, but needs some vacation time.  3/5

Pure intentions, but this boy looks confused. Where is he? Let him go home. Also kind of looks like he’s made of marshmallows??? 4/5 

Imposter. 0/5  This is a blue fire with yellow lipstick. Stop this. He’s smug about about it too, wtf.

I have high hopes for his future. He is a good boy with good intentions. I would trust this young man. 5/5

A clumsy boy. Something is a little weird about this bird, but he still tries his best. A good friend. 4/5

An eager boy. He wants to fly but needs more practice. I support his dreams and I hope he achieves great things. 4/5

Paranoid fellow. Blames everyone else for his bullshit. Will never find love. 0/5

Eager to impress.  Might be a double agent. A handsome boy, but I do not trust him. 3/5 

The world does not deserve this kind of purity. 5/5  

Two Persian bracelets of gold and turquoise with terminals in the shape of birds. While the bracelets are modern, dating to the 19th-20th centuries, the style reflects the jewelry of the Seljuks, a Turkish dynasty which ruled a vast empire in Western Asia during the 11th to 13th centuries CE. Image from Bonhams.

Fragment of the ‘Libyan Tribute Palette’, from Abydos.
Naqada III, ca. 3200-3000 BC. Schist, 19 x 22 cms.
Now in the Egyptian Museum, Cairo. JE 27434.

“On the reverse side of the palette we see the square shapes of seven fortresses. Above each is a symbol of a god or goddess, such as a hawk, lioness, and scorpion; all are symbols of power and kingship, and each holds a hoe, performing the foundation ceremony for the town or fortress.”

Inside the Egyptian Museum with Zahi Hawass