anchovy oil

anonymous asked:

What do you think the founding fathers favourite foods were?

Benjamin Franklin consistently asked his wife Deborah to ship him barrels of apples while he lived abroad:

“Goodeys I now and then get a few; but roasting Apples seldom, I wish you had sent me some; and I wonder how you, that used to think of everything, came to forget it.  Newton Pippins would have been the most acceptable.” (letter from Benjamin Franklin in London, to Deborah in Philadelphia)

Franklin also had Deborah ship him barrels of cranberries both in England and France. Franklin helped introduce France to potatoes as a food source. At that time, the French believed potatoes to be poisonous. Franklin took part in a campaign to help the French embrace potatoes as an alternative to wheat after wheat crop failures caused a shortage. He was the guest of honor at a party thrown by French pharmacist Antoine-Augustin Parmentier, where every course of the meal featured potatoes. Benjamin Franklin also was the one who introduced tofu to the United States. 

George Washington was very fond of cherries. George Washington was extremely fond of fish, served in many ways.He ate it almost daily, often at breakfast with the Hoe Cakes which, he loved. At the Mount Vernon table frequently were Mashed Sweet Potatoes, String Beans with Almonds, Steak and Kidney Pie, and Fish Muddle. He also loved a wide variety of fruits and nuts. He preferred simple meals over fancy ones.

John Adams supposedly ate pickles nearly every day. Others say his favorite food was Indian Pudding. But, according to David McCullough in John Adams, President Adams and gulped a tankard of cider as soon as he got out of bed every day.

In Holland Thomas Jefferson sampled waffles for the first time and loved them so much, he immediately bought a waffle iron. Chocolate caught his fancy. He was so amazed by ice cream he was the first to introduce it to the United States from France and was the first to serve it in the white house. “Bring a stock of macaroni, Parmesan cheese, figs of Marseilles…raisins, almonds, mustard…vinegar, oil and anchovies.” He as especially fond of fresh vegetables. He was particularly fond of olives, figs, mulberries, crabs, shad, oysters, partridge, venison, pineapple, and light wines. As well as, sweet potatoes, turnip greens, baked shad, Virginia ham, green peas, crab. He was very fond of Virginia sweet corn that he raised it in his Paris garden. We also cannot forget Macaroni and Cheese can we? 

Dolley Madison, James Madison’s wife prepared many different types of ice cream. Madison’s meal usually consisted of, “Virginia ham, buttery rolls, apple pie, and cider.” 

There’s no clear documentation talking about Alexander Hamilton and his favorite foods, however, it’s known that while dining with Jefferson and Madison, “The beef was a masterpiece that Hamilton praised extravagantly” and that “Hamilton positively exulted” at the sight of “the delicious vanilla ice cream that still seemed like a miracle for it was enclosed in a warm pastry, like a cream puff.” 

James Monroe, like Thomas Jefferson, acquired a taste for French cuisine while serving abroad. Mr. Monroe is said to have loved this, and enjoyed dishes from his native Virginia.

“On the Monroe family plantation in Virginia…[Elizabeth Monroe] served many old Southern recipes, dishes her husband hand known from boyhood. One of the most famous, spoon bread, dates back to early Indian days…James Monroe, like his former teacher and mentor, Thomas Jefferson, was fond of Continental cuisines, but he was equally fond of the foods of his Virginia childhood…Chicken Fried with Rice…[was] used frequently by Elizabeth Monroe at the Monroe plantation, Oak Hill…Hot breads and biscuts were a way of life in James Monroe’s Virginia… ”

I have heard though, that Monroe’s favorite food was chicken. 

How to cook Pasta Puttanesca:

Ingredients:

  • 1 35-ounce can of Tuttorosso Italian-style peeled plum-shaped tomatoes
  • 3 or more cloves garlic, lightly smashed and peeled
  • 3 or more anchovy fillets
  • ½ cup pitted, oil-cured black olives
  • 2 tablespoons capers
  • Salt, chili powder and berbere (not pepper)
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 pound “interestingly-shaped” pasta (I used both thin spaghetti and rotini)
  • Chopped fresh parsley and basil leaves for garnish

1. Bring pot of water to boil and salt it. Warm 2 tablespoons oil with garlic and anchovies in skillet over medium-low heat. Cook, stirring occasionally, until garlic is lightly golden and anchovies are brown and melty.

2. Drain tomatoes and crush with fork. Add to skillet with a light sprinkle of berbere. Raise heat to medium-high and cook, stirring occasionally, until tomatoes break down and mixture becomes saucy, about 10 minutes. Stir in olives, capers and chili powder, and continue to simmer.

3. Cook pasta, stirring occasionally, until it is tender. Drain quickly and toss with sauce and remaining tablespoon of oil. The fresh basil is highly recommended, if only to make your kitchen smell like a dream.

The aroma is peppy and sharp, lending credit to the the legend of luring customers. The salty anchovy-caper-olive combination packs a punch, so don’t over-salt without tasting. For extra authenticity, prepare the Baudelaires’ chocolate pudding for dessert.

7

Okay, this is the REAL SPANISH FOOD! And not those things you can find around here.
Spanish traditional cousine is very variated, with dozens and dozens of traditional dishes and their variants acording with the region. Here is a little list of some of the most popular from different regions.

  1. -Andalusian gazpacho: a cold tomate soup with other many ingredients. Very usual in summer.
  2. -Boquerones en vinagre (fresh anchovies with vinegar and oil): a tipical tapa made with raw fish.
  3. -Bacalao al pil pil (Pil-pil Cod): a yummy cod dishe from Basque Country.
  4. -Caldeirada de cordero (lamb’s casserole): a very specied lamb’s stew with fried potatoes.
  5. -Cocido madrileño (Madrilian ‘boiled’ stew): the most popular of all “cocido” stews. It involves soup as first serve, vegetables&chickpeas and different meats, and other things you can use later for new dishes.
  6. -Callos a la madrileña: another traditional dishe from Madrid, made with cow’s guts, coldmeats, paprika…
  7. -Arroz con costra (crusted rice): a traditional dishe from Valencia region, kind of similar to “paella”, but coocked in the oven with egg (the crust).


So please, forget the “nachos”, “tacos”, “burritos” and other “tortillas”.

3

Tagliatelle with Baby Artichokes

serves 2 as a first plate


20 baby artichokes, cleaned, the larger ones halved

120 g dried tagliatelle

1 ½ lemons + more for cleaning

3 anchovies in oil, drained

1 T of the anchovy oil

1 small dried peperoncino/a pinch of dried red pepper flakes

1 T unsalted butter

1 small garlic clove, grated/pressed

2 T créme fraîche

extra virgin olive oil for serving

salt


1. Bring a large pot of water to the boil, add salt + squeeze in the juice of 1 lemon. Add artichokes and boil until fork tender, 5-7 minutes.

2. Drain artichokes, reserving water. Bring the water back up to the boil, add salt if necessary, then add the pasta. Cook two minutes less than package instructions.

3. While the pasta cooks, In a large saucepan add the anchovies, anchovy oil, and peperoncino. Cook on a medium heat until anchovies have melted, then add the butter, garlic and finally the artichokes. When the pasta is a little more al dente than you’d like, add it to the saucepan with a ladle of the pasta water and the juice of half a lemon. Turn the flame to high, and mix until the sauce has thickened. 

4. Turn off the heat and stir in the créme fraîche. Taste for salt, add if necessary. Serve immediately with a drizzle of your finest extra virgin olive oil. 

Tom Hiddleston reads
You Hated Spain
by Ted Hughes (1930-1998)

Spain frightened you.
Spain.
Where I felt at home.
The blood-raw light,
The oiled anchovy faces, the African
Black edges to everything, frightened you.
Your schooling had somehow neglected Spain.
The wrought-iron grille, death and the Arab drum.
You did not know the language, your soul was empty
Of the signs, and the welding light
Made your blood shrivel.
Bosch Held out a spidery hand and you took it
Timidly, a bobby-sox American.
You saw right down to the Goya funeral grin
And recognized it, and recoiled
As your poems winced into chill, as your panic
Clutched back towards college America.
So we sat as tourists at the bullfight
Watching bewildered bulls awkwardly butchered,
Seeing the grey-faced matador, at the barrier
Just below us, straightening his bent sword
And vomiting with fear. And the horn
That hid itself inside the blowfly belly
Of the toppled picador punctured
What was waiting for you. Spain
Was the land of your dreams: the dust-red cadaver
You dared not wake with, the puckering amputations
No literature course had glamorized.
The juju land behind your African lips.
Spain was what you tried to wake up from
And could not. I see you, in moonlight,
Walking the empty wharf at Alicante
Like a soul waiting for the ferry,
A new soul, still not understanding,
Thinking it is still your honeymoon
In the happy world, with your whole life waiting,
Happy, and all your poems still to be found.

“She stared miserably at Olaf’s plate of food and found herself wishing she had bought poison at the market and put it in the puttanesca sauce.” -The Bad Beginning by Lemony Snicket 

Spaghetti alla Puttanesca 

Ingredients

  • 1 package of spaghetti
  • 4 or 5 fresh tomatoes, diced, or one can of diced tomatoes
  • 3 cloves of garlic, minced
  • A handful of olives and capers, diced
  • 3 tablespoons (approx.) of olive oil
  • Parsley for garnish 
  • Salt, pepper, sugar, and red pepper flakes to taste
  • [optional] Anchovies 

Directions

  1. Cook the pasta according to package directions in lightly salted water. When done, toss with olive oil.
  2. While the pasta is cooking, sauté the garlic¹ and anchovies in olive oil. 
  3. Once the garlic is browned, add the tomatoes to the pan. Reduce, a word which here means “thickening a liquid by cooking over a low heat.” If the sauce is too tart, add a pinch of sugar. 
  4. Add the olives and capers, and stir. Season with salt, black pepper, and red pepper to taste. 
  5. Spoon sauce over spaghetti. Serve with a sprig or two of parsley. 


¹To prevent the garlic from sticking to the knife, sprinkle each clove with salt before cutting. 

You hated Spain

Spain frightened you. Spain
Where I felt at home. The blood-raw light,
The oiled anchovy faces, the African                
Black edges to everything, frightened you.
Your schooling had somehow neglected Spain.
The wrought-iron grille, death and the Arab drum.
You did not know the language, your soul was empty
Of the signs, and the welding light                
Made your blood shrivel. Bosch
Held out a spidery hand and you took it
Timidly, a bobby-sox American.
You saw right down to the Goya funeral grin
And recognized it, and recoiled                    
As your poems winced into chill, as your panic
Clutched back towards college America.
So we sat as tourists at the bullfight
Watching bewildered bulls awkwardly butchered,
Seeing the grey-faced matador, at the barrier            
Just below us, straightening his bent sword
And vomiting with fear. And the horn
That hid itself inside the blowfly belly
Of the toppled picador punctured
What was waiting for you. Spain                
Was the land of your dreams: the dust-red cadaver
You dared not wake with, the puckering amputations
No literature course had glamorized.
The juju land behind your African lips.
Spain was what you tried to wake up from            
And could not. I see you, in moonlight,
Walking the empty wharf at Alicante
Like a soul waiting for the ferry,
A new soul, still not understanding,
Thinking it is still your honeymoon                
In the happy world, with your whole life waiting,
Happy, and all your poems still to be found.

–Ted Hughes, Birthday Letters, 1998

GREEN GODDESS GRILLED CHEESE

Green Goddess Grilled Cheese Sandwich

based on all those gorgeous green goddesses out there…

makes 1 sandwich

Ingredients

2 slices bread (we used a white bread, but one filled with lots of different whole grains and seeds would be *awesome*)
2-3 tablespoons Green Goddess Herb Pesto (recipe below)
2 slices mild white melty cheese like mozzarella
handful fresh baby spinach
¼ avocado, sliced
2 tablespoons goat cheese, crumbled
olive oil (and butter if you’re so inclined)

Directions

Spread about 1 tablespoon of Green Goddess Herb Pesto onto each slice of bread (2 tablespoons total, but if you’re sensitive, go light, the pesto is STRONG).

On one slice of bread, add 1 slice of cheese, sliced avocado, crumbled goat cheese, spinach, second slice of cheese, then top it with second slice of bread. Press together gently.

Heat 1 tablespoon olive oil in a frying pan over medium low heat. (If you want to use butter, add it to the oil and let it melt). Add the sandwich to the oil and cook until bread is golden brown. Press down on the sandwich lightly, then flip the sandwich over and cook until second side is golden brown.

Green Goddess Herb Pesto

Ingredients

1 clove garlic
1 (or 2 if you’re ballsy) anchovy fillet (in oil)
½ small shallot, chopped (about 1 tablespoon)
1 teaspoon lemon juice
handful chopped fresh Italian parsley
handful chopped kale
2-3 tablespoons chopped fresh tarragon
1 tablespoon chopped chives
¼ cup olive oil
salt and pepper to taste

Directions

Pulse garlic, anchovy, and shallot in food processor until chopped. With the food processor running, add lemon juice, parsley, kale, tarragon and chives. (It won’t process very well yet, don’t worry).

Very slowly drizzle in olive oil until kale and herbs get sufficiently chopped and everything is the consistency of a pesto. You may need more or less of the olive oil depending on how big a “handful” of herbs is to you. You can also turn off the food processor and push herbs down the side of the bowl with a spatula every once in a while.

Season to taste with salt and pepper (You probably won’t need too much salt if you used 2 anchovies).