anchalee

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#ILookLikeAnEngineer 

Isis Anchalee wasn’t planning on starting a twitter trend when she was pulled into quickly snap a photo for OneLogin’s recruiting campaign, but when people tired to call her out on ‘what an female engineer looks like’, the #ILookLikeAnEngineer hashtag was born. 

You can read her story here: You May Have Seen My Face on BART and check out the other tweets here!

4 Reasons Agents of SHIELD’s Daisy Johnson Is A Great Multidimensional Representation of Women in Tech.

SHIELD‘s Daisy Johnson isn’t altogether free from tropes (pretty much no character is), but she breaks the mold in a number of ways and sets a good precedent for more strong representations of women who work with computers.

1. She has strong moral values and wants to do what’s best for humankind.
2. She’s compassionate and empathetic, giving everyone a chance but not compromising herself for them.
3. She’s not highly-educated, but she’s portrayed as a highly competent hacker anyway.
4. Hacking isn’t the only skill she has.

The message Daisy sends is that it’s possible to hold technical knowledge alongside other aspects of your personality or identity. A love of computers can coexist with a high regard for other people’s emotions and valuing your time with them. You don’t have to choose between wearing makeup or being a computer engineer—as real-life examples such as Isis Anchalee have pointed out. You can be a hacker as a woman, as an extrovert, as a fighter, or as anything else you choose, and you can use your skills to make you better, even if they aren’t the same ones that stereotypically come with the package.

Daisy Johnson isn’t the perfect representation for women in tech—such a representation cannot exist, as no one portrayal can encompass a diverse group—but as a singular example that breaks out of boxes and shows more people tech can be accessible to them, too, she’s a great addition to our cultural canon.

What does an engineer look like?

Platform engineer Isis Anchalee is questioning stereotypes.

After an ad campaign she was featured in for work garnered negative attention, she responded with #ILookLikeAnEngineer. The hashtag is challenging public perception of gender norms in tech. Already, it’s been used over 50,000 times.

Learn more.

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Software Engineer Isis Anchalee created the hashtag #ILookLikeAnEngineer after sexist reactions to an ad campaign where she was featured. What came with the hashtag was a wave of positive posts by diverse people in STEM fields. Engineers look like people. 

“I just want to make it clear that we are all humans, and there are certain patterns of behavior that no one should have to tolerate while in a professional environment” wrote Anchalee in her Medium post that started  the hashtag. 

Read more via Buzzfeedhttp://bzfd.it/1P4AeD0

I’ve hesitated to join in with the #iLookLikeAnEngineer hashtag, even though I’m a trans woman in tech, because I didn’t want to appropriate the conversation. I was assigned male at birth, and got through school and the first years of my career presenting as that gender, and didn’t have to be on the receiving end of the institutional sexism (not that it didn’t deeply affect me). But Isis Anchalee, the woman who started the hashtag in the first place, had this to say (emphasis mine):

The reality is that most people are well intentioned but genuinely blind to a lot of the crap that those who do not identify as male have to deal with.

[…]

This industry’s culture fosters an unconscious lack of sensitivity towards those who do not fit a certain mold. I’m sure that every other women and non-male identifying person in this field has a long list of mild to extreme personal offenses that they’ve just had to tolerate. (x)

Soo….. here I am at my desk, in the office of the startup I’ve been with since the beginning, when I was the only web engineer. And I look like an engineer.

calum has been getting so much hate lately and all i want to do is sit down and cuddle with him whilst listening to him talk about how he feels, maybe with the odd tear here and there and just comfort him bc that boy is doing nothing wrong, he is trying to live like a normal 19 but people are just giving him shit bc of it