an najaf

Benefits of the Reciting of the Holy Quran

1- Reciting the Holy Quran entitles you to be among the rememberers, the obedient, the humble ones, the delivered, the jurisprudents, and not the unmindful. It will entitle you to the reward of the charity of a Qintar.

2- Whoever recites a verse from the Quran, ten good deeds will be written for him and ten bad deeds will be written off.

3- Whoever recites the Quran only by looking at it and not by heart, will benefit from his eyes and will diminish the chastisement of his parents even if they are unbelievers.(Ibid.,p.853)

4- Whoever recites the Quran by looking at it, not reciting by heart, will torment Satan.

5- Whoever recites the Quran by looking at it will not only enjoy the reward of recitation but also his looking at the Quran is a kind of worship. In this relation, Abu Tharr reports: “I heard the Messenger of Allah say: ‘Looking at Ali ibn Abi Talib is worship, as the looking kindly and mercifully at one’s parents is worship, and the looking at the Quran and the Ka’ba is also worship.” (wasa'il shia vol 4 p. 854)

6- Reciting every chapter of the Quran, as mentioned in Usool al-Kafi, has special benefits such as being safeguarded against certain diseases and the torment of the grave. Increased sustenance, relieving of pain, happiness, reward of a martyr, forgiveness of sins, safety, and entering paradise are other benefits.

Her Mother was murdered in her childhood.
Then she saw her Father murdered by a poisonous sword.
Her elder brother got poisoned.
Her other brothers were beheaded along with her sons and relatives in a single day.
She was taken prisoner.
At the end she says,
“I saw nothing except beauty!”
______________
Remember that these lines are not just for praising her, but to reflect upon and follow the blessed and pure Soul.

[2:214] “Or do you think that you would enter the garden while yet the state of those who have passed away before you has not come upon you; distress and affliction befell them and they were shaken violently…”

Remember that it is known that our deliverance at the onset of Imam Mahdi’s uprising will not occur unless Allah Almighty will filter and purge out the tiniest hypocrisy from among us.

May Allah make these days of mourning an awakening for our souls and purify us a thorough purification, and hasten our path to reach our Master (atfs).


#muharram1439

IRAQ. Najaf governorate. Near Najaf. March 31, 2003. An Iraqi man comforts his four-year-old son at a holding centre for prisoners of war, in the base camp of the US Army 101st Airborne Division. The boy had become terrified when his father was hooded and handcuffed. Hoods were placed over detainees’ heads because they were quicker to apply than blindfolds, according to the military. Bags were also used to disorientate prisoners and to protect their identities. It is not known what happened to the man or his son. After pictures from Abu Ghraib emerged, the military quickly changed their methods and decided to use blindfolds again.

“Ten years ago. I doubt the desert remembers the barbed wire and hooded, shackled prisoners. Does it at least remember the screams of a boy clinging to a father who mumbled words of comfort from beneath a black sandbag? I hope the desert, too, felt relieved when an American soldier cut off the plastic handcuffs, and the man could finally embrace his child. But this desert has seen so much since the beginning of civilization that I do not think this was a remarkable day. This is not even a particularly noticeable war in the context of Iraq’s 5,000 years of history. But for me, this moment endures. The whole scene was surreal. This image was one of the last of my career. Three months later, I was disabled in a car accident. My daughter was the same age as the child in this photo. I look at her today and wonder what happened to that boy. I wonder why we were at war. What was accomplished? Ten years [in 2013]. An army of dead, wounded and mentally destroyed people. Maybe they, too, are wondering: why? I remember, and I wonder.”

World Press Photo of the Year 2003.

Photograph: Jean-Marc Bouju/AP