There’s an amusement park in Transylvania that’s 400 feet below ground. 

Photos: Shutterstock/RossHelen/RaduBerean

Photo: Cristian Bortes

This converted salt mine in Turda, Romania is one of the world’s oldest, having been mentioned as early as 1075.

Photos: Cristian Bortes / Enrico Strocchi

Photos: Cristian Bortes

The man-made cavern is always 54 degrees with 80% humidity, and is relatively free of allergens and bacteria.

Photos: Cristian Bortes

It was a working mine starting in the 17th century until it became a cheese storage facility and a bomb shelter in 1932.

Photo: someone10x

60 years later, it was transformed into a magical underground amusement park.

Photo: Salina Turda

Photo: someone10x

Visitors can go bowling, ride on a Ferris wheel, row around the indoor lake, or play mini golf, ping pong, and basketball.

Photo: someone10x

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Dismaland is described by its mysterious street-artist creator, Banksy, as “a festival of art, amusements, and entry-level anarchism.”

Apathetic attendants wear safety vests and mouse-ear hats while telling guests to “end joy” the attractions.

Here’s some text from the event’s official brochure:

Are you looking for an alternative to the soulless sugar-coated banality of the average family day out? Or just somewhere cheaper. Then this is the place for you—a chaotic new world where you can escape from mindless escapism. Instead of a burger stall, we have a museum. In place of a gift shop we have a library, well, we have a gift shop as well.

Bring the whole family to come and enjoy the latest addition to our chronic leisure surplus—a bemusement park. A theme park whose big theme is: theme parks should have bigger themes…

This event contains adult themes, distressing imagery, extended use of strobe lighting, smoke effects and swearing. The following items are strictly prohibited: knives, spraycans, illegal drugs, and lawyers from the Walt Disney corporation.

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When Land of Oz first opened, it was very popular and one of the top attractions in the area. 

Apparently Debbie Reynolds was there.

But it was tied to another investment that fell flat, and one of the owners passed away, so eventually the doors were closed for good.

Thirteen years later, the doors were opened for a weekend festival in the autumn, and it’s been a tradition ever since. The park is mostly in disrepair, but gets spruced up a little for the festival.

Thousands of people attend the annual festival to get a glimpse of what the park might have been like when it was open.

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