amphibian chytrid fungus

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Male and female banded horned treefrogs at El Valle Amphibian Conservation Center.
These very rare banded horned treefrogs have a unique habit, they prey on other frogs. It is possible that this frog-eating habit brings them into frequent contact with other frogs and makes them much more likely to contract the amphibian chytrid fungus that is wiping out frogs in Latin America. These two individuals are part of a conservation breeding colony maintained by the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project @amphibianrescue in Panama.

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(via National Geographic (@natgeo) • Instagram photos and videos)

An endangered horned marsupial frog at the El Valle Amphibian Conservation Center. These frogs have completely disappeared from many of their original habitats. It is thought that this species is extremely susceptible to chytridiomycosis, an infectious disease in amphibians caused by the chytrid fungus that is wiping out frogs in Latin America. This individual is part of a conservation breeding colony maintained by the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project @amphibianrescue  in Panama.

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natgeo Video by @joelsartore. An endangered horned marsupial frog at the El Valle Amphibian Conservation Center. These frogs have completely disappeared from many of their original habitats. It is thought that this species is extremely susceptible to chytridiomycosis, an infectious disease in amphibians caused by the chytrid fungus that is wiping out frogs in Latin America. This individual is part of a conservation breeding colony maintained by the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project @amphibianrescue in Panama. To see still images of this frog check out @joelsartore.

Here’s a baby Mossy Red-eyed Frog (Duellmanohyla soralia) from the cloud forest of Cusuco National Park, Honduras. This critically endangered frog is one of our focal rescue species at the HARCC-Honduras Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Center

HARCC is continuing to seek funding to support operational costs and for the monitoring of amphibian chytrid fungus in Honduras. If you can help, please contact us at HondurasARCC@gmail.com or view our wildlife artwork sales gallery HERE

Here’s a special treat for all of you! No longer extinct! This frog was previously declared extinct after vanishing nearly 30 years ago. This species (Craugastor milesi) was likely a victim of amphibian chytrid fungus spreading into Honduras in the 1980’s.  I recently discovered this guy at my HARCC frog rescue site in Cusuco National Park and the species has now been reclassified as “critically endangered” on the IUCN Red List. National Geographic wrote a couple stories on it! Sadly, this forest is being attacked by people who want to use the land for agriculture. I hope this species does not disappear again, this time forever…. Follow our frog rescue page to see updates!

Many frog species in Honduras are at risk of extinction from chytrid fungus, like this critically endangered Ptychohyla hypomykter treefrog from my frog rescue site in Cusuco National Park. Tomorrow, I’ll be sending out our next big #HARCC frog rescue project update! So keep an eye on this page! on.fb.me/1WRMIRE (March 5 UPDATE!! Our first frog rescue video now added at the top of my page! Check it out!)

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That time I discovered an “extinct” frog…..yeah, that was a good day.  This is my photo which is now one of the only pictures that exists of this frog, the Miles’ robber frog (Craugastor milesi) of Honduras.  Story by National Geographic here: http://voices.nationalgeographic.com/2013/08/30/missing-frog-resurfaces-in-honduras-freshwater-species-of-the-week/


Help me raise funds to protect this rainforest and its endangered frogs by visiting my art gallery!  Any of the images can be made into posters, coffee mugs, greeting cards, etc. and will directly support my rescue operation.