american-comic

anonymous asked:

I'm really tempted to make a YouTube channel about asexuality and experiences with it, since I don't really know any asexual vloggers on that platform apart from one and I don't really like the way they try to represent the whole sexuality when I can't relate to a lot of what they're saying. I have the script written and the camera set up, but I don't know if anyone would watch me? It's not an egocentric thing, I'm just frustrated with the underrepresentation for aces and I want to help

Hell yeah! That sounds like something I’d want to watch! I know of maybe 3 or 4 asexual youtubers, but it’s great to see different types of people who share similar identities. After all, we’re not all the same. A lot great media has come from people who have felt underrepresented, like jazz and American comic books.

Anyway, it sounds like something you really want to do. You just gotta do it,  dude! We’ll even post or reblog your videos here, if you want. 

You can do it! <3

Some of the most talented women in comics, on Tumblr and beyond, are joining us for a special Women’s History Month Issue Time. 

ASK OUR PANELISTS A QUESTION!

Maytal Gilboa is the founder and CEO of Emet Comics, a publishing company focused on empowering female comic book creators. In 2016 Emet Comics acquired Fresh Romance, a romance comic anthology from publisher Rosy Press.  Fresh Romance Volume 2 is currently in production and being crowdfunded through Kickstarter.  Prior to starting her publishing company, Maytal spent 4 years working as an executive at animation house, ReelFX Creative Studios, where she worked on films such as The Book of Life, and Freebirds.  Emet’s latest webcomic is Zana.

Sally Jane Thompson is an artist and writer whose work includes comics from Oni, Dark Horse, Image, Oxford University Press, The Phoenix and more, as well as live art, sketch reportage and illustration. She drew The Ruby Equation (with Sarah Kuhn, Savanna Ganucheau and Steve Wands) for Fresh Romance Vol 1, and is returning to the series to both write and draw Under the Oak Trees.

Born and raised in Chicago, Ashley A. Woods is an illustrator who got her start through self-publishing her action-fantasy comic series, “Millennia War”. January 2015, she met Amandla Stenberg and Stranger Comics at a convention; six months later, she began working on “NIOBE: She Is Life” which went on to sell tens of thousands of copies and inspired many cosplays.

Afua Richardson [ pronounced Ah FOO wah ] is an award winning American Comic-book illustrator best known for her work on Marvel’s Black Panther World of Wakanda. Some of her other works include Wildstorm, Attack on Titan, X-men 92, Captain Marvel, All Star Batman to name a few. Afua is also a musician, voice actor, activist and mentor. As a recipient of the Nina Simone award, she is aptly called a Jane of All trades.

Suzana Harcum and Owen White of the webcomic Tripping Over You are a two-person comics team currently based in Arizona. They are a married lesbian couple who once flirted with each other by creating characters and drawing together, and continue to make LGBTQ positive comics today for the love of writing stories together.

Our panelists will start responding on Monday 27 March

JOHNNY STORM IS OFFICIALLY BI/PAN/POLY

Marjorie Liu, who wrote Johnny briefly during his appearance in Daken: Dark Wolverine #4, confirmed on twitter very recently that Johnny and Daken had a sexual relationship. 

Johnny’s bi/pan/polysexuality is canon now, although, probably because of the Fantastic Four’s current lack of popularity, not one sound was made about it in the media or in the Marvel fandom.

It’s not as if there’s nothing in canon itself to back up Liu’s statement. In 2005′s Spectacular Spider-Man #21, Johnny openly admits to having slept with at least one nonbinary alien: 

In Fantastic Four #563, we even find out that there’s an alternate universe version of Johnny – in which he’s the older of the Storm siblings – where he is the one who is married to Reed Richards, not Sue:

In The New Mutants: Superheroes and the Radical Imagination of American Comics, comics scholar Ramzi Fawaz traces Johnny’s history as a queer figure all the way back to his initial appearance Fantastic Four #1, so Johnny is not only currently queer, he has always implicitly been written that way.

Sometimes the hints were subtle, like in his Fantastic Four #309 trip to Fire Island, which was, at the time it was published, a notorious gay vacation spot.

And sometimes the hints were more overt:

Maybe it’s just me, but I think that the fact that Johnny Storm, part of Marvel’s First Family and one of the founding members of the Fantastic Four, the team that is responsible for making the Marvel universe what it is today and which was once Marvel’s most popular and influential property, is officially bi/pan/poly IS A BIG DEAL. 

JOHNNY STORM, FOUNDING MEMBER OF THE FANTASTIC FOUR AND MARVEL’S FIRST FAMILY, IS OFFICIALLY BI/PAN/POLY. IT’S IMPORTANT.

Why do American comics have this thing where they seem to emphasize way too many random words that don’t make any sense and I spend the whole time reading up and down in a lilting mental voice

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Sketchy Behavior | Hellen Jo 

Never afraid to speak and/or draw her mind, Los Angeles based artist and illustrator, Hellen Jo and her characters can be described as rough, vulgar, tough, jaded, powerful, bratty and bad-ass - AKA her own brand of femininity. Known for her comic Jin & Jam, and her work as an illustrator and storyboard artist for shows such as Steven Universe and Regular Show, Hellen’s rebellious, and sometimes grotesque artwork and illustrations are redefining Asian American women and women of color in comics. In fact, that’s why Hellen Jo was a must-interviewee for our latest Sketchy Behavior where we talk to her about her love of comics and zines, her antiheroines, and redefining what Asian American women identity is or can be; and what her ultimate dream project realized would be.  

Keep reading

Fed up with the boredom of being the strongest character in his series, Saitama organizes the Land of Fiction’s first-ever universe-wide Cosmic Clash Tournament, wherein he will fight every single contender one-on-one. The prize? The ability to say that one has defeated One Punch Man himself. But Saitama gets more than he bargained for when, on the day of the tournament, all of the heavy hitters from the American comics show up the fight him

And Black Panther is an AMERICAN comic!!! The movie had an African American director and stars African American, American folks one gen removed from Africa, and Afro-British people who are also one generation removed from Africa. SO TBH????? Issa cute lil mix of people! Holy Unnecessary Diaspora Conflict Batman!

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Erasure hurts. Representation matters. 

Created by Jes Tom & Chewy May