american-army

also can we acknowledge how WELL this all went ?? ofc we don’t know everything that happened behind the scenes but there was no major public drama. the boys seem so happy and comfortable. 

their stylists came THROUGH. namjoon handled the interviews flawlessly. their twitter following skyrocketed and it looks like if there is any racism on social media it’s getting drowned out by not only happy armies but americans who’ve never seen bts before checking out their stuff and wondering who “third guy from the left” and “the one with the deep ass voice” are & APPRECIATING them. they got to see so many of their faves, jungkook and desiigner hugged, so many of the western artists they met were SO SUPPORTIVE and respectful. not to mention the crazy exposure they’re getting between itunes, news outlets, other celebs tweeting abt them…

the biggest hitch tonight was hoseok spilling coke on seokjin’s expensive vest and considering how deeply worried a lot of the fandom was i think this was a stellar success.

I am the flag of the United States of America
My name is Old Glory.

I fly atop the world’s tallest buildings.
I stand watch in America’s halls of justice.
I fly majestically over great institutes of learning.
I stand guard with the greatest military power in the world.
Look up! And see me!

I stand for peace, honor, truth, and justice.
I stand for freedom.
I am confident … I am arrogant.
I am proud.

When I am flown with my fellow banners,
my head is a little higher,
my colors a little truer.

I bow to no one.
I am recognized all over the world.
I am worshipped.
I am saluted.
I am respected.
I am revered. I am loved.
And I am feared.

I have fought every battle of every war for more than 200 years…
Gettysburg, Shilo, Appomatox, San Juan Hill, the trenches of France,
the Argonne Forest, Anzio, Rome, the beaches of Normandy,
the deserts of Africa, the cane fields of the Philippines,
the rice paddies and jungles of Guam, Okinawa, Japan, Korea, Vietnam,
and a score of places long forgotten by all but those who were with me.

I was there!

I led my soldiers.
I followed them.
I watched over them…
They loved me.
I was on a small hill in Iwo Jima.
I was dirty, battle-worn and tired,
but my soldiers cheered me,
and I was proud.

I have been soiled, burned, torn and trampled on the streets of countries
I have helped set free.
It does not hurt … for I am invincible.
I have been soiled, burned, torn and trampled on the streets of my country,
and when it is by those with whom I have served in battle … it hurts.
But I shall overcome … for I am strong.

I have slipped the bonds of Earth
and stand watch over the uncharted new frontiers of space
from my vantage point on the moon.

I have been a silent witness to all of America’s finest hours.
But my finest hour comes
when I am torn into strips to be used for bandages
for my wounded comrades on the field of battle.
when I fly at half mast to honor my soldiers…
and when I lie in the trembling arms
of a grieving mother at the graveside of her fallen son.

I am proud.
My name is Old Glory.
Dear God … Long may I wave!

The Army of Immigrants

Records of men who camped at Valley Forge, expose the myth of farmers throwing down their plows to fight for land they’d owned for generations.

Enlisted ranks were largely landless men in their teens or early twenties, unmarried and poor.  The army offered steady wage, food, whiskey, and clothes, so patriotism was not often the driving factor of their enlistment.  A study of 710 New Jersey Continentals showed almost all came from lower economic classes and only a small number had a profession at all.

In addition to being landless, most were not American-born. Before the revolution, over 300,000 Irish had immigrated to North America, and their bitterness of British oppression helped lead the drive for independence. In most New England Continental regiments, 10-20% of the men had Irish surnames, and in middle states that percentage was consistently higher. Units from Maryland, New Jersey, and Delaware were usually around 45% Irish. In The First Pennsylvania, 315 of 660 men were Irish-born and another 215 listed “America” as their place of birth, likely second-generation immigrants.  

After the Irish, German-born men held the second-largest percentage, making up somewhere from 10-20% of the rank-and-file soldiers at Valley Forge.  They were the largest ethnic group in the United States at the time, mostly settled in New York and Pennsylvania.  

Additionally, almost 10% of Washington’s army, camped at Valley Forge, was made up of African or African American soldiers.  Many enlisted voluntarily, but it’s true that some were given as bounty for their masters to avoid enlistment.  And, many served through to the end of the war, finding better treatment among enlisted ranks as ‘brother soldiers’.

info from: “No Meat, No Soldier: Race, Class and Ethnicity in the Continental Army” Charles P. Neimeyer

theguardian.com
Army veterans return to Standing Rock to form a human shield against police | US news | The Guardian

Jake Pogue, a 32-year-old marine corps vet, returned to the Sacred Stone camp on Friday.

US veterans are returning to Standing Rock and pledging to shield indigenous activists from attacks by a militarized police force, another sign that the fight against the Dakota Access pipeline is far from over.

Army veterans from across the country have arrived in Cannon Ball, North Dakota, or are currently en route after the news that Donald Trump’s administration has allowed the oil corporation to finish drilling across the Missouri river.

The growing group of military veterans could make it harder for police and government officials to try to remove hundreds of activists who remain camped near the construction site and, some hope, could limit use of excessive force by law enforcement during demonstrations.

“We are prepared to put our bodies between Native elders and a privatized military force,” said Elizabeth Williams, a 34-year-old air force veteran, who arrived at Standing Rock with a group of vets late on Friday. “We’ve stood in the face of fire before. We feel a responsibility to use the skills we have.”

It is unclear how many vets may arrive to Standing Rock; some organizers estimate a few dozen are on their way, while other activists are pledging that hundreds could show up in the coming weeks. An estimated 1,000 veterans traveled to Standing Rock in December just as the Obama administration announced it was denying a key permit for the oil company, a huge victory for the tribe.

The veterans camp at Standing Rock.

The massive turnout – including a ceremony in which veterans apologized to indigenous people for the long history of US violence against Native Americans – served as a powerful symbol against the $3.7bn pipeline.

But the presence of vets was not without controversy. Some said the groups were disorganized and unprepared to camp in harsh winter conditions, and others lamented that they weren’t following the directions of the Native Americans leading the movement.

Vets with post-traumatic stress disorder also suffered in the cold and chaotic environment without proper support, said Matthew Crane, a US navy veteran who is helping coordinate a return group with the organization VeteransRespond. His group has vowed to be self-sufficient and help the activists, who call themselves “water protectors”, with a wide range of services, including cleanup efforts, kitchen duties, medical support and, if needed, protection from police.

“This is a humanitarian issue,” said Crane, 33. “We’re not going to stand by and let anybody get hurt.”

On Friday afternoon, as snow rapidly melted during an unusually warm day in Cannon Ball, Jake Pogue helped organize a vets camp area at Sacred Stone, the first camp that emerged last spring in opposition to the pipeline.

“We’re not coming as fighters, but as protectors,” said the 32-year-old marine corps vet, noting that he was concerned about police escalating tactics. “Our role in that situation would be to simply form a barrier between water protectors and the police force and try to take some of that abuse for them.”

Since last fall, police have made roughly 700 arrests, at times deploying water cannons, Mace, rubber bullets, teargas, pepper spray and other less-than-lethal weapons. Private guards for the pipeline have also been accused of violent tactics.

“We have the experience of standing in the face of adverse conditions – militarization, hostility, intimidation,” said Julius Page, a 61-year-old veteran staying at the vets camp.

Dan Luker, a 66-year-old veteran who visited Standing Rock in December and returned this month, said that for many who fought in Vietnam or the Middle East it was “healing” to help water protectors.

Julius Page a 61-year-old veteran: ‘We have the experience of standing in the face of adverse conditions.’

“This is the right war, right side,” said Luker, a Vietnam vet from Boston. “Finally, it’s the US military coming on to Sioux land to help, for the first time in history, instead of coming on to Sioux land to kill natives.”

Luker said he was prepared to be hit by police ammunition if necessary: “I don’t want to see a twentysomething, thirtysomething untrained person killed by the United States government.”

LaDonna Brave Bull Allard, founder of the Sacred Stone camp and a Standing Rock tribe member, said she welcomed the return of the vets.

“The veterans are going to make sure everything is safe and sound,” she said, adding, “The people on the ground have no protection.”

At Standing Rock, indigenous activists say the mass arrests and police violence have led many of them to develop PTSD, suffering symptoms that many veterans understand well.

“This historical trauma of indigenous communities in this country is very real. It’s tragic,” said Crane. “The military has a lot of the same problems.”

Aubree Peckham, a member of the Mescalero Apache tribe who has been at Standing Rock for months, was in tears on Friday as she described the way indigenous water protectors have bonded with vets.

“We don’t know how to protect ourselves against the tactical weapons they are using,” she said. “They are getting us better prepared.”

Peckham said the affection was mutual: “We are able to talk about PTSD. And they finally feel like they are understood.”

The bayonet held especial fear for Americans as it embodied the superior martial professionalism of the British army; American troops were much less accustomed to bayonet fighting.” 

- Holger Hoock, ‘Mangled Bodies: Atrocity in the American Revolutionary War’ in Past and Present: A Journal of Historical Studies, Volume 230, Issue 1, eds. Alexandra Walsham and Matthew Hilton (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016), pp. 157 - 158. 

So, in retrospect I realise it may be a bit hard to hear what I’m saying because of the whole “inside a BMP” thing. (For those who don’t know, a BMP-2 is a second generation, land and water based armored anti infantry vehicle from the 1980s which still makes up a a large proportion of the Russian armored forces. As for the soap, I can’t tell you much about it other than that I picked it up on the way to the event, and didn’t swallow the whole thing due to toxicity/indigestion risk (shortly after the video ended I spat it out the back of the BMP, to the shock of the operators). I had to cut short because we were stopping to let more people in, and it would have ruined the moment of the filming.

But suffice to say, OP delivered, Well done guys, you got me to eat soap while riding a tank, and I’m at almost 500 followers now.

@humans-are-seriously-weird Rekina, are you ready for your challenge yet?

4

// important: when tweeting, do not include a picture or a gif bc it will cancel your vote. your twitter account must be public. both international and american army fans can vote 100 times a day on twitter. american fans can also vote on the website, so do both! 

 BUT right now the main focus should be on streaming spring day, not today, and blood sweat and tears!!! since voting does not open til may 1st 

[cred: tastyjeon on twitter, bangtansfacts on ig, and Jams on army’s amino]