american-academy-of-Art

Opposites Attract {Reader Insert}

Imagine: Flower crowns and pastels are her thing, and both Archie Andrews and Jughead Jones fully accept her for that. Who would have thought that the elder Jones man would feel the same, and much more.

Summary: {Y/N} is ecstatic to be reunited with her two best pals, but it seems alcohol is not her favourite. Getting away from the stink of beer, and the heat of dancing teens, she escapes to the garage. When confronted by her best friend’s father, she discovers a long-kept secret that he’s dying to act upon.

Request?: Yes! A nonny wanted a fic that had the clash of polar opposites between the reader and FP. I do hope I’ve done your request justice.

Warnings: F/M Smut, Unprotected Sex (wrap it before you tap it, kids), Reader is about 18 (so things are kinda okay, right?)

Word Count: 3236

Taglist: @theserpentgod 

Disclaimer: I do not own the gif, credit to the user that made it. The Riverdale characters are not mine, credits to the writers and producers of the franchise. If smut is not your thing, do not read this.

A/N: The idea of flower child!reader being best friends with Archie and Jughead is so cute to me, and the fluff between them all was fun to write. I hope I did FP justice in his ‘bad boy’ perspective. Enjoy, my little bookworms 🖤

Originally posted by riverdales-daily

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6

Allow me to introduce you to Robert Underwood Johnson (1853-1937). For the longest time, I only knew him as that one weirdly close friend of Nikola Tesla (himself a popular crush, it would seem). As I begin to research Robert further, I realized what a remarkable person he was in his own right.

Robert was the editor of the CENTURY magazine, which no longer exists, but in its time it published material by renowned writers and thinkers, including Tesla’s controversial article, THE PROBLEM OF INCREASING HUMAN ENERGY. Through his work with the magazine, Robert came to know anybody who was anybody in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. One article I read referred to him as a “genius whisperer.” That’s not far from the truth.

Robert is best remembered today because of his friendship with Tesla. Tesla was a notoriously asocial man who had very few close friends. Robert, and his wife Katharine, were the exceptions. Robert and Tesla shared a love of poetry, and Tesla nicknamed Robert “Luka Filipov” after a hero from a Serbian epic. The two men would remain close for the rest of Robert’s life, with Robert referring to Tesla as his best friend on several occasions.

(There’s all kinds of talk that Tesla may have been in love with Katharine Johnson, or vice versa, and while I think there is some merit to that theory, it’s not entirely pertinent to this post. Though I can’t help but wonder if Robert knew, and how he felt about it… But I digress.)

In 1920, President Wilson appointed Robert ambassador to Italy, a post he held until the summer of 1921. Robert was a lifelong Italophile who had been given awards by the Italian government for his work supporting international copyright laws.

I should dedicate some space to what Robert would most want to be remembered for: his poetry. While not necessarily a great poet, he did publish several books, and it’s hard to deny his passion and enthusiasm. He even wrote a poem titled IN TESLA’S LABORATORY, dedicated to his friend. He favored formal styles of poetry, often speaking out against what he saw as the encroachment of modernism on classical forms of expression (for example, he did not care for the work of either T.S. Eliot or Walt Whitman). While I do not necessarily agree with this, it does show that Robert was a strong minded individual who was completely dedicated to the causes he chose to support.

As previously mentioned, Robert was a friend of a great many famous and talented people. He records his reminiscences in his memoir, REMEMBERED YESTERDAYS, a warm and engaging look back on a fascinating life.

Some other neat things:
- His famous friends, apart from Tesla, included Mark Twain, John Muir, and Rudyard Kipling.

- It was at Robert’s encouragement that Ulysses Grant wrote his memoirs. They were published in the CENTURY at first.

- He and Muir helped establish Yosemite National Park.

- Katharine and Robert had two children, Owen and Agnes. Owen went on to become a successful writer.

- In the early 20th century, Robert was the secretary of the American Academy of Arts and Letters. At this time, there were many rabidly misogynistic members of this all-male organization. When the question of the election of women to the Academy was raised, Robert supported letting women in, in spite of the often vicious opposition from other members.

- Apparently, as Katharine Johnson lay dying, she told her husband to always keep in touch with Tesla. Shortly there after, Robert wrote to Tesla saying that this might not be an easy thing to do, but it would not be his fault if it was not done.

- It’s like, wow, you can really tell how much he loved this woman.

- He signed his last note (before his death in 1937) to Tesla as “Luka Filipov.” Are you crying yet? I am.

OK, I’m sorry, this turned into a really long post, but Robert Underwood Johnson deserves the recognition. He was more than just Tesla’s friend. He was a poet, a diplomat, an editor, an environmentalist, an activist, a friend, a father, a husband. He was, I truly believe, a good and admirable person not only for his own time, but for ours as well. As a lover of all things Italian who’s been known to scribble down the odd poem now and again, I feel especially drawn to him. Everybody should have as good a friend as him. Hell, everyone should try to be as good a friend as him.

Tl:dr Robert was an insanely accomplished dude who was BFFs with some awesome people, was an awesome person in his own right, and was probably the best friend anyone ever had. He deserves to be more than just a footnote in the Tesla story.

Now, if you’ll permit me a little more room, a quick guide to the photos (from top to bottom):

- Robert as a younger man. I’m not gonna lie, I never found beards attractive until I saw this old, grainy photo.

- with Tesla in the laboratory. Supposedly they did this a lot.

- walking down the steps of the White House like a boss after being appointed Ambassador to Italy.

- seen here at left modeling for the sculptor Paul Swan, at right. That bust is majestic.

- portrait by William Merritt Chase, a fellow member of the Academy and one of the most important artists of the day.

- an Onion headline edit by yours truly. Robert was tough and downright feisty when he had to be, but I think this still applies.

Cheers, Mr. Ambassador!

Books are the carriers of civilization. Without books, history is silent, literature dumb, science crippled, thought and speculation at a standstill. Without books, the development of civilization would have been impossible. They are engines of change (as the poet said), windows on the world and lighthouses erected in the sea of time. They are companions, teachers, magicians, bankers of the treasures of the mind. Books are humanity in print.
—  Barbara W. Tuchman, Bulletin of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Vol. 34, No. 2 (1980)

anonymous asked:

Hello! I was wondering if you could recommend articles or books for someone who is not an anthropologist but would love to be one. It could be of any topic, but friendly towards someone who doesn't have an advance knowledge in this study field. Maybe you could recommend your favorite first articles/books that made you fall in love more with anthropology when you were just starting to study it. Thank you! P.s. I LOVE your blog; I have learned so much and it's really entertaining 😊

Thank you!! This is a tough question, and I hope others comment some other sources. 

Geertz, Clifford. 1973. “Thick description: Toward an interpretive theory of culture.” In The interpretation of cultures. 

Geertz, Clifford. 1974. “‘From the native’s point of view’: On the nature of anthropological understanding.” Bulletin of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences 28 (1): 26-45. 

Malinowski, Bronislaw. 1922. “Introduction.” In Argonauts of the Western Pacific. 

Farmer, Paul. 1996. “On suffering and structural violence: A view from below.” Daedalus 125 (1): 261-283. 

Abu-Lughod, Lila. 2002. “Do Muslim women really need saving? Anthropological reflections on cultural relativism and its Others.” American Anthropologist 104 (3): 783-790. 

Foucault, Michel. 1976. The history of sexuality

Chomsky, Noam and Edward S. Herman. 1998. Manufacturing consent. 

Chomsky, Noam. 2016. Who rules the world? 

Mead, Margaret. 1928. Coming of age in Samoa. 

Bohannan, Laura. 1961. “Shakespeare in the bush.” Natural History. 

Said, Edward. 1978. “Introduction.” In Orientalism. 

The Combahee River Collective. 1977. “A Black feminist statement.” 

Bourdieu, Pierre. 1992. “Price formation and the anticipation of profits.” In Language and symbolic power. 

Duggan, Lisa. 2003. “Introduction” and “Equality, Inc.” In The twilight of equality? 

Harris, Marvin. 1976. “History and significance of the emic/etic distinction.” Annual Review of Anthropology 5: 329-350. 

Benedict, Ruth. 1934. Patterns of culture. 

These are in no particular order. Just the order I remembered them. 

Any article you can look at that’s from a major anthro journal like American Anthropologist or American Ethnologist or things like that is also good. A lot of the ones I want to recommend are actually from queer theory, not anthropology. I tried limiting it to that field specifically. Actually I lied some are queer theory good luck figuring out which. 

Anything by any of these authors is also worthy. 

You may be able to find a lot of these as PDFs online but you didn’t hear it from me. 

Edit: you can also find films or short videos featuring a lot of these people, especially Chomsky

youtube

On this day in music history: September 16, 1983 - “Let The Music Play” by Shannon is released. Written by Chris Barbosa and Ed Chisolm, is it the debut single and biggest for the R&B vocalist from Washington DC. Raised in Brooklyn, NY since childhood, by early 1983, twenty five year old Brenda Shannon Greene is a recent graduate of the American Academy Of Dramatic Arts in New York City, and is doing post graduate studies at York University. While still in college, Greene is a vocalist with the New York Jazz Ensemble. It is while she is with the group that Shannon meets producer Quentin Hicks. Impressed with her voice, Hicks sets up an audition for Shannon with Mark Liggett and Chris Barbosa, staff songwriters and producers at independent dance label Emergency Records. Liking what they hear, the producers play her a demo of a song written by Barbosa and Ed Chisolm  originally called “Fire And Ice”, which she agrees to record. Liggett and Barbosa take her into the studio the same to day to record her vocals on the track. The lyrics are re-written and the song is re-titled “Let The Music Play”. Recorded at Greene Street Studios in New York City in July of 1983, musician Rob Kilgore (Man Parrish, Xēna (aka Lisa Fischer)) plays all of the instruments on the track including synthesizers and programming the Roland TR-808 drum machine. The 808 is MIDI'ed(Musical Instrument Digital Interface) with a Roland TB-303, a rudimentary thirteen key bass synthesizer that gives the song its distinctive and immediately identifiable sound. Emergency releases “Let The Music Play” as a 12" single in mid-September of 1983. The record creates an immediate sensation on the street and on dance floors in New York, and in other major cities around the world. “Let The Music Play” is picked up for wider distribution by Atlantic and re-released on their Mirage Records imprint. That same Fall, Shannon goes back in the studio with Liggett and Barbosa to record a full length album to capitalize on the success of the single. “Let The Music Play” marks a major sea change in the evolution of dance and club oriented music. The records’ acceptance by US Top 40 pop radio, is the first time that dance music receives widespread exposure, since being virtually blackballed from mainstream pop radio after the end of the Disco Era. “Music” goes on to sell more than eight million copies worldwide, also introducing the genre of “Freestyle” into the vernacular of club culture, with its distinctive syncopated Latin and Hip Hop influenced rhythms dominating dance music for the rest of the 1980’s. “Let The Music Play” spends six weeks at number one on the Billboard Club Play chart on October 29, 1983, peaking at #2 on the R&B singles chart, #8 on the Hot 100 in February of 1984, and is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

starlightprincess17  asked:

Hi! I'm a Cultural Anthropology student transferring form a community college to a big University in the fall. I'm a little nervous about keeping up and was wondering if you have any book/ article recommendations to help me brush up on upper division concepts and prepare for the type of work done on the quarter system vs semester system. or just good reads in general. The school is UC San Diego if you need specifics. Thank you for your time.

I’ve only even been to semester schools, so I can’t really help you there. Below I’m reposting a list of readings I’ve suggested to others before (see FAQ), and surely people will comment here others: 

Geertz, Clifford. 1973. “Thick description: Toward an interpretive theory of culture.” In The interpretation of cultures.

Geertz, Clifford. 1974. “‘From the native’s point of view’: On the nature of anthropological understanding.” Bulletin of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences 28 (1): 26-45.

Malinowski, Bronislaw. 1922. “Introduction.” In Argonauts of the Western Pacific.

Farmer, Paul. 1996. “On suffering and structural violence: A view from below.” Daedalus 125 (1): 261-283.

Abu-Lughod, Lila. 2002. “Do Muslim women really need saving? Anthropological reflections on cultural relativism and its Others.” American Anthropologist 104 (3): 783-790.

Foucault, Michel. 1976. The history of sexuality.

Chomsky, Noam and Edward S. Herman. 1998. Manufacturing consent.

Chomsky, Noam. 2016. Who rules the world?

Mead, Margaret. 1928. Coming of age in Samoa.

Bohannan, Laura. 1961. “Shakespeare in the bush.” Natural History.

Said, Edward. 1978. “Introduction.” In Orientalism.

The Combahee River Collective. 1977. “A Black feminist statement.”

Bourdieu, Pierre. 1992. “Price formation and the anticipation of profits.” In Language and symbolic power.

Duggan, Lisa. 2003. “Introduction” and “Equality, Inc.” In The twilight of equality?

Harris, Marvin. 1976. “History and significance of the emic/etic distinction.” Annual Review of Anthropology 5: 329-350.

Benedict, Ruth. 1934. Patterns of culture.

These are in no particular order. Just the order I remembered them.

Any article you can look at that’s from a major anthro journal like American Anthropologist or American Ethnologist or things like that is also good. A lot of the ones I want to recommend are actually from queer theory, not anthropology. I tried limiting it to that field specifically. Actually I lied some are queer theory good luck figuring out which.

Anything by any of these authors is also worthy.

You may be able to find a lot of these as PDFs online but you didn’t hear it from me.

Edit: you can also find films or short videos featuring a lot of these people, especially Chomsky @starlightprincess17

Rosalyn Sussman Yalow (1921-2011)  was an American medical physicist, and a co-winner of the 1977 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Yalow was a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and she received the National Medal of Science in 1988.

Yalow is most known for the development of the radioimmunoassay (RIA). RIA is a radioisotope tracing technique that uses antibodies to measure small amounts of biological substances in fluids. She first developed  it to study blood insulin levels in diabetes patients, and the method is still used widely today.

Books are the carriers of civilization. Without books, history is silent, literature dumb, science crippled, thought and speculation at a standstill. Without books, the development of civilization would have been impossible. They are engines of change (as the poet said), windows on the world and lighthouses erected in the sea of time. They are companions, teachers, magicians, bankers of the treasures of the mind. Books are humanity in print.
—  Barbara W. Tuchman

[Bulletin of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Vol. 34, No. 2 (Nov. 1980), pp. 16-32]

anonymous asked:

What ethnographies would you recommend for a complete beginner to anthropology?

The most obvious ones are Geertz:

Geertz, Clifford. 1973. “Thick description: Toward an interpretive theory of culture.” In The interpretation of cultures.

Geertz, Clifford. 1974. “‘From the native’s point of view’: On the nature of anthropological understanding.” Bulletin of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences 28 (1): 26-45.

But there are many, many ethnographies on pretty much any subject you can think of. It depends on what you’re interested in. For me, I’ve read: G-Strings and Sympathy, The Night is Young, and The Politics of Passion. (Not very many, I know). For classes I’ve also read My Freshman Year and Paying for the Party. 

via the National Women’s History Museum:

Maria Mitchell was America’s first professional female astronomer. On October 1, 1847, at age 29, she discovered a comet, becoming the first American to do so. For her achievements, in 1848 Mitchell became the first woman elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and to the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 1850. Then in 1865 she became a professor of astronomy at Vassar College. Learn more about women’s involvement in STEM fields in this online exhibit: https://www.google.com/culturalinstitute/beta/exhibit/breaking-in-women-in-science-technology-engineering-mathematics/NAKCO5S1I8MMIQ. (Photo Credit: Maria Mitchell Association)

Gail Fisher, who broke many racial barriers for black women on American television, was born August 18, 1935. Her mother raised her and her siblings with her own hair styling business in Edison, New Jersey. During her teenage years, Fisher had showed an interest in entertainment through her participation in various beauty contests, acting in her High School’s plays and as a cheerleader. Fisher studied acting at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts, after winning a contest sponsored by Coca-Cola, and later became a member of the Repertory Theater at Lincoln Center. She did many television commercials and declared herself “the first black female– no, make that black, period– to make a national TV commercial, on camera, with lines.” Her most well known and one of the first major roles for black women was as the secretary “Peggy Fair” on the show Mannix from 1968 until 1975. Fisher, pictured with Mark Stewart, as her son in Mannix (1970), won two Golden Globes and an Emmy Award  for the role. She was the first black woman to win an Emmy Award. 

Interview: Loretta Swit, TV Guide Magazine, 30th of January 1971.

By Kathleen McCoy.

Fade inHaving just subdued yet another mayhem-bent killer, Joe Mannix (Mike Connors) straightens his tie, mops his brow and lets loose with a stream of superlatives about a favourite on-screen guest-star seductress: “Loretta Swit is a marvellously versatile talent. She can play both glamourous and gusty roles. She has the class and charisma that the movie stars of old had. She has everything going for her. She’s not just another pretty girl…”

Cut toActor Peter Graves, taking 60 seconds from his impossible mission of the week to exclaim: “What a marvellous young actress! She’s beautiful, but not just another pretty girl. She has a helluva career ahead of her!”

Cut toJohn Mantley, executive producer of Gunsmoke: “If all the shouting about Loretta Swit ever dies down, the voices at Gunsmoke will chorus, ‘We told you so! She’s not just another pretty girl!’ We like to think we found her!” Dissolve to

Scene One: The object of this high-level superlative-slinging lives in an unpretentious little guest house in the wilds of west Hollywood. It’s 10 A.M on a Tuesday morning. The doorbell rings. Silence, then…”AUGGGHHH!” The discovery speaks from within. Sounds of running footsteps, scuffling, barking dogs. The door flies open and there she is—an apparition in crumpled baby-doll pyjamas with pink plastic curlers in her hair, gray acne preparation on her face. They’re right. She’s not just another pretty girl.

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primalvolcanic  asked:

" Ɯнαт ιѕ α 'Ƙαηує'? "

                                                            Inhale.

[ ☠ ] — “Kanye Omari West  is an American rapper, songwriter, record producer, fashion designer, and entrepreneur. Born in Atlanta and raised in Chicago, West briefly attended art school before becoming known as a producer for Roc-A-Fella Records in the early 2000s, producing hit singles for artists such as Jay Z and Alicia Keys. Intent on pursuing a solo career as a rapper, West released his debut album The College Dropout in 2004 to widespread critical and commercial success, and founded the record label GOOD Music. He went on to pursue a variety of different styles on subsequent albums Late Registration (2005), Graduation (2007), and 808s & Heartbreak (2008). In 2010, he released his fifth album My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy to rave reviews from critics, and the following year he collaborated with Jay Z on the joint LP Watch the Throne (2011). West released his abrasive sixth album, Yeezus, to further critical praise in 2013. His seventh album, The Life of Pablo, was released in 2016.

West’s outspoken views and life outside of music have received significant mainstream attention. He has been a frequent source of controversy for his conduct at award shows, on social media, and in other public settings. His more scrutinized comments include his off-script denunciation of President George W. Bush during a live 2005 television broadcast for Hurricane Katrina relief and his interruption of singer Taylor Swift at the 2009 MTV Video Music Awards. West’s efforts as a fashion designer include collaborations with Nike, Louis Vuitton, and A.P.C. on both clothing and footwear, and have most prominently resulted in the YEEZY collaboration with Adidas beginning in 2013. He is the founder and head of the creative content company DONDA. His 2014 marriage to television personality Kim Kardashian has also been subject to widespread media coverage.

West is among the most acclaimed musicians of the 21st century,and is one of the best-selling artists of all time, having sold more than 32 million albums and 100 million digital downloads worldwideHe has won a total of 21 Grammy Awards, making him one of the most awarded artists of all time and the most Grammy-awarded artist to have debuted in the 21st century. Three of his albums have been included and ranked on Rolling Stone’s 2012 update of the “500 Greatest Albums of All Time” list. He has also been included in a number of Forbes annual lists. Time named him one of the 100 most influential people in the world in 2005 and 2015.

West was born on June 8, 1977 in Atlanta, Georgia. His parents divorced when he was three years old. After the divorce, he and his mother moved to Chicago, Illinois. His father, Ray West, is a former Black Panther and was one of the first black photojournalists at The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Ray West was later a Christian counselor, and in 2006, opened the Good Water Store and Café in Lexington Park, Maryland with startup capital from his son. West’s mother, Dr. Donda C. (Williams) West, was a professor of English at Clark Atlanta University, and the Chair of the English Department at Chicago State University before retiring to serve as his manager. West was raised in a middle-class background, attending Polaris High School in suburban Oak Lawn, Illinois after living in Chicago.

At the age of 10, West moved with his mother to Nanjing, China, where she was teaching at Nanjing University as part of an exchange program. According to his mother, West was the only foreigner in his class, but settled in well and quickly picked up the language, although he has since forgotten most of it. When asked about his grades in high school, West replied, “I got A’s and B’s. And I’m not even frontin’.”

West demonstrated an affinity for the arts at an early age; he began writing poetry when he was five years old. His mother recalled that she first took notice of West’s passion for drawing and music when he was in the third grade.[21] Growing up in Chicago, West became deeply involved in its hip hop scene. He started rapping in the third grade and began making musical compositions in the seventh grade, eventually selling them to other artists. At age thirteen, West wrote a rap song called “Green Eggs and Ham” and began to persuade his mother to pay $25 an hour for time in a recording studio. It was a small, crude basement studio where a microphone hung from the ceiling by a wire clothes hanger. Although this wasn’t what West’s mother wanted, she nonetheless supported him. West crossed paths with producer/DJ No I.D., with whom he quickly formed a close friendship. No I.D. soon became West’s mentor, and it was from him that West learned how to sample and program beats after he received his first sampler at age 15.”

After graduating from high school, West received a scholarship to attend Chicago’s American Academy of Art in 1997 and began taking painting classes, but shortly after transferred to Chicago State University to study English. He soon realized that his busy class schedule was detrimental to his musical work, and at 20 he dropped out of college to pursue his musical dreams. This action greatly displeased his mother, who was also a professor at the university. She later commented, “It was drummed into my head that college is the ticket to a good life… but some career goals don’t require college. For Kanye to make an album called College Dropout it was more about having the guts to embrace who you are, rather than following the path society has carved out for you.”

West’s musical career has been defined by frequent stylistic shifts and different musical approaches. Asked about his early musical inspirations, he named artists such as A Tribe Called Quest, Stevie Wonder, Michael Jackson, George Michael, LL Cool J, Phil Collins and Madonna.Other music figures West has invoked as inspirations include Puff Daddy, David Bowie,Miles Davis and Gil-Scott Heron.West was formatively mentored by Chicago producer No I.D., who introduced him to hip hop production in the early 1990s, allowing a teenage West to sit in on recording sessions.Early in his career, West pioneered a style of production dubbed “chipmunk soul” which utilized pitched-up vocal samples, usually from soul and R&B songs, along with his own drums and instrumentation.His first major release featuring his trademark soulful vocal sampling style was “This Can’t Be Life”, a track from Jay-Z’s The Dynasty: Roc La Familia. West has noted Wu-Tang Clan producer RZA as an influence on his style.

West further developed his style on his 2004 debut album, The College Dropout. After a rough version was leaked, West meticulously refined the production, adding string arrangements, gospel choirs, and improved drum programming. The album saw West diverge from the then-dominant gangster persona in hip hop in favor of more diverse, topical lyrical subjectsincluding higher education, materialism, self-consciousness, minimum-wage labor, institutional prejudice, family, sexuality, and his personal struggles in the music industry.For his second album, Late Registration (2005), he collaborated with film score composer Jon Brion and drew influence from non-rap influences such as English trip hop group Portishead. Blending West’s primary soulful hip hop production with Brion’s elaborate chamber pop orchestration, the album experimentally incorporated a wide array of different genres and prominent orchestral elements, including string arrangements, piano chords, brass flecks, and horn riffs,amid a myriad of foreign and vintage instrumentsCritic Robert Christgau wrote that “there’s never been hip-hop so complex and subtle musically.” With his third album, Graduation (2007), West moved away from the soulful sound of his previous releases and towards a more atmospheric, rock-tinged, electronic-influenced style,drawing on European Britpop and Euro-disco, American alternative and indie-rock, and his native Chicago house.West retracted much of the live instrumentation that characterized his previous album and replaced it with distorted, gothic synthesizers, rave stabs, house beats, electro-disco rhythms, and a wide array of modulated electronic noises and digital audio-effects. In addition, West drew musical inspiration from arena rock bands such as The Rolling Stones, U2, and Led Zeppelin. In comparison to previous albums, Graduation is more introspective, exploring West’s own fame and personal issues.”

                                                     Exhale.

“That answer ya question?”

anonymous asked:

Hello Madame! So I'm an art student in Graphic Design and a self-taught artist since more or less ten years, but I honestly learn way more things by myself than at art school so I still have one big problem. I can draw a lot of things but when it comes to poses I just... Draw always the same, easy ones, or I'm obligated to use references to draw something a bit different. It's killing me, because I want to leave my comfort zone and draw poses from my imagination alone. Any tips, tutorials ? <3

Hi anon ^^

First, I have to apologize because it’s gonna be a long post, consider it as my “DEFINITIVE REFERENCE PICTURE POST” :)

I’m obligated to use references to draw something a bit different.(…) I want to leave my comfort zone and draw poses from my imagination alone. Any tips, tutorials ? <3            

The first step is drawing all kind of poses under different angles using reference pictures. What? But…I don’t want to!! That’s why I’m contacting you P-M!!! WHAT THE HELL!!!

Calm down ^^

It’s necessary in order to build in your head a kind of “visual library” that will give you the possibility to draw without references later. It will train your eye and your hand. Also, at the same time you’re working on your “visual library”, you have to study anatomy techniques like for instance breaking figures from reference down into more simple 3D shapes. You have to learn how to draw groups of simple 3D shapes in perspective and then construct figures from them. However, it doesn’t come in one day and also, you’ll have to use tons of reference pics AT FIRST. You see what I mean? You can’t go from zero reference to “cool figure drawing” in one step, you have to use the combo “reference + anatomy technique” to be able to reach this goal.

Artists who train in illustration are taught how to draw from using a building block tool for construction, much like some of the pictures that you can see below. 

As I said above, it really takes a lot of training and practice to build objects from shapes. Basically every form begins as a shape. The more experience you get, the more you understand proportions and the more skills you will have to draw without visual reference.

In order to reach this result, you have to study anatomy tutorials. They always work more or less the same way, a bit like the pic above: decomposing the human body in geometric shapes or in elaborated stick figures. Here are a couple of video tuts.

TLDR: practice over and over again by using refs. Create a “visual library”. Learn to break the body into shapes. That will be the only way to make you come out of your comfort zone.

(Rainbow Comic Sans for maximum effect. I guess that now, I have everybody’s attention if it wasn’t the case til now)

Yes, you have rules to make things easier to draw from memory BUT THERE IS NOTHING WRONG ABOUT USING REFERENCE PICTURES!! It shouldn’t “kill you”, it shouldn’t make you feel guilty and you shouldn’t feel “less of an artist” because you need references for complicated poses!!! Plenty of pros don’t do art without models and props. And the old masters did the same thing. You want examples? Ok, let’s start!

Here’s a great quote from Alex Ross’ book, Mythology.

Ross’ biggest breakthrough as an illustrator came in June 1987 at the American Academy of Art, when he was introduced to the use of live models. “Before that, I had no idea how much I could grow as a draftsman. It was a huge turning point, because all through grade school I hadn’t so much as drawn from photographs_I’d always thought that you had to make it all up out of your head, and that’s how you did ‘fantasy’ illustration. Now I wonder if I would have developed even sooner had I drawn from life as child”

Photo session for a Superman drawing:

Alex Ross using the photos for his work (and you see the pose is not even complicated!)

And wait, MY FAVORITE PAGE EVER. PROFESSIONAL artists taking pictures of themselves and of their friends so that they can have reference pictures for their artworks. An example:

(Artist Claudio Pozas  posing with…huh…a modern day sword for one of his artworks)

And if you want a funny anecdote, you see Dean’s shoes in this art? It’s mine. I had a problem with the pose so I took a pic of myself with a camera and worked from the pic.

Yeah…but for manga and comics, it’s more stylized, they don’t use refs…Artists draw from the top of their heads…and…HA! HA! HA!!!! MEGA LOL! Two examples from my personal archive. Here is a picture taken from a Japanese program. I don’t remember the name of the artist but this mangaka is drawing a page for his forthcoming comic and instead of drawing from memory do you know what he did? He asked his assistant to pose for him. He took a pic with a Polaroid and…voilà!

The guy is in his 70′s!! He’s a super experienced artist and he still uses references for his art.

Let’s carry on! Another example. When I was a teen I bought an artbook by artist Takeda Yaoi (my first yaoi stuff!) and two of the poses looked familiar.

You bet it looked familiar. The artist used as reference, pictures of members from some my favorite bands at the time, Gene and Menswear (90′s teenagers, fan of Britpop, hello…).

(Pictures: L’UOMO Vogue, May-June 1995). And yes, we are in 2016 and I still have this magazine and this artbook at home. I..have problem throwing things away, ok? ><

Also, do you know what comic artists use nowadays for referencing? 3D softwares like Poser.They create the pose with a 3D model, they orientate the model according to the perspective they want and they use it as ref. It doesn’t mean they aren’t “real” artists, it just makes life fucking easier and it reduces the chances of anatomy mistakes.

(The picture above proves that not ALL the artists in the business use models or reference pictures xD)

Listen, I understand that you want to draw from imagination, that for some reason it makes you feel “freer” and that some poses are complicated to obtain from refs (the super dynamic “spider man poses” for instance) but it shouldn’t “kill you” to need refs to draw the human body when you really need it. If it’s to sketch or to draw “super comic style” poses, ok, why not, but otherwise WHEN IN DOUBT: REF!!! Particularly when you work on something complicated or on a big project like an artwork, for a book, a comic cover, etc..Do you understand? Even dôjinshi artists who seem to sketch things from the top of their heads use refs. I KNOW IT BECAUSE I KNEW SOME OF THEM.

TLDR2: Drawing from imagination is cool, it’s convenient for some poses or for some styles (super dynamic comic poses) but otherwise, don’t feel guilty for using refs! Pro artists do it all the time and now that 2000000 miliion images are available on the Internet, they do it even more than before!

Good luck anon, YOU CAN DO IT!! ♥

Gwendolyn Brooks (June 7, 1917 – December 3, 2000) 

American poet, author, and teacher. Her work often dealt with the personal celebrations and struggles of ordinary people in her community. She won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry on May 1, 1950, for Annie Allen making her the first African American to receive that award. In 1976, she became the first African American woman inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Letters. (Wikipedia)

From our stacks: Cover detail from Family Pictures. Gwendolyn Brooks. Detroit: Broadside Press, 1971.

William Seward Burroughs II (also known by his pen name William Lee) was an American novelist, short story writer, essayist, painter, and spoken word performer. A primary figure of the Beat Generation and a major postmodernist author, he is considered to be “one of the most politically trenchant, culturally influential, and innovative artists of the 20th century”. His influence is considered to have affected a range of popular culture as well as literature. Burroughs wrote 18 novels and novellas, six collections of short stories and four collections of essays. Five books have been published of his interviews and correspondences. He also collaborated on projects and recordings with numerous performers and musicians, and made many appearances in films.

He was born to a wealthy family in St. Louis, Missouri, grandson of the inventor and founder of the Burroughs Corporation, William Seward Burroughs I, and nephew of public relations manager Ivy Lee. Burroughs began writing essays and journals in early adolescence. He left home in 1932 to attend Harvard University, studied English, and anthropology as a postgraduate, and later attended medical school in Vienna. After being turned down by the Office of Strategic Services and U.S. Navy in 1942 to serve in World War II, he picked up the drug addiction that affected him for the rest of his life, while working a variety of jobs. In 1943 while living in New York City, he befriended Allen Ginsberg and Jack Kerouac, the mutually influential foundation of which grew into the Beat Generation, and later the 1960s counterculture.

Much of Burroughs’ work is semi-autobiographical, primarily drawn from his experiences as a heroin addict, as he lived throughout Mexico City, London, Paris, Berlin, the South American Amazon and Tangier in Morocco. Burroughs accidentally killed his second wife, Joan Vollmer, in 1951 in Mexico City, and was consequently convicted of manslaughter. In the introduction to Queer, a novel written in 1952 but not published until 1985, Burroughs states, “I am forced to the appalling conclusion that I would have never become a writer but for Joan’s death … [S]o the death of Joan brought me into contact with the invader, the Ugly Spirit, and maneuvered me into a lifelong struggle, in which I had no choice except to write my way out”. (Queer, 1985, p.xxii). Finding success with his confessional first novel, Junkie (1953), Burroughs is perhaps best known for his third novel Naked Lunch (1959), a controversy-fraught work that underwent a court case under the U.S. sodomy laws. With Brion Gysin, he also popularized the literary cut-up technique in works such as The Nova Trilogy (1961–64).

In 1983, Burroughs was elected to the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters, and in 1984 was awarded the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by France. Jack Kerouac called Burroughs the “greatest satirical writer since Jonathan Swift”, a reputation he owes to his “lifelong subversion” of the moral, political and economic systems of modern American society, articulated in often darkly humorous sardonicism. J. G. Ballard considered Burroughs to be “the most important writer to emerge since the Second World War”, while Norman Mailer declared him “the only American writer who may be conceivably possessed by genius”.

Burroughs had one child, William S. Burroughs, Jr. (1947–1981), with his second wife Joan Vollmer. He died at his home in Lawrence, Kansas, after suffering a heart attack in 1997.

Daily inspiration. Discover more photos at http://justforbooks.tumblr.com

Barbara Tuchman (1912-1989) was a best-selling author and historian who won the Pulitzer Prize twice. She wrote several books which presented history in elaborate narratives that engaged even uninformed readers.

She first received the Pulitzer Prize in 1963 for Guns of August, a book about the political background of World War I, and then a second time in 1972 for Slitwell and the American Experience in China. She was a lecturer at Harvard, and the first female president of the American Academy of Arts and Letters.