american war crimes

IRAQ. Nineveh governorate. Tal Afar. January 18, 2005. Samar Hassan, 5, screams after her parents were killed by U.S. soldiers from the 25th Infantry Division. The troops fired on the Hassan family car when it unwittingly approached them during a dusk patrol. Parents Camilla and Hussein Hassan were killed instantly, and a son Raccan, 11, was seriously wounded in the abdomen. Racan, paralysed form the waist down, was latter treated in the U.S.

Chris Hondros was with an army unit when its soldiers killed the parents of this blood-spattered girl at a checkpoint, and his photo was published around the world. Mr. Hondros was kicked out of the unit, though he soon became embedded with a unit in another city.

The following is an excerpt written by Chris Hondros about his photograph. The writing was pulled from his laptop recovered after he was killed on assignment in Libya. 

“At six in Tal Afar, it isn’t yet quite dark. A gloom hung over the roads and alleys with just a little dark blue light from the sky. No one was out. As we made our way up a broad boulevard, in the distance I could see a car making its way toward us. With all the relentless car bombings in Iraq, groups of soldiers are understandably nervous about any cars that approach them, and they do not allow private cars to breech the perimeter of their foot patrols, particularly at night. 

"We have a car coming,“ someone called out, as we entered an intersection. We could see the car about a 100 meters down but I doubt if it could see us—it would be hard to see this group of darkly camouflaged men in the gloom. That already gave me a bad feeling about what might conspire, so I moved over to the side of the road, out of anyone’s line of fire. The car continued coming; I couldn’t see it anymore from my perch but could hear its engine now, a high whine that sounded more like acceleration than slowing down. It was maybe 50 yards away now. “Stop that car!” someone shouted out, seemingly simultaneously with someone firing what sounded like warning shots—a staccato measured burst. The car continued coming. And then perhaps less than a second later a cacophony of fire, shots rattling off in a chaotic overlapping din. The car entered the intersection on its momentum and still shots were penetrating it and slicing it. Finally the shooting stopped, the car drifted listlessly, clearly no longer being steered, and came to a rest on a curb. I stared at it in shocked silence. Soldiers began to approach it warily. The sound of children crying came from the car, and my worst fears were instantly realized. I walked up to the car and a teenaged girl with her head covered emerged from the back, wailing and gesturing wildly. After her came a boy, tumbling onto the ground from the seat, already leaving a pool of blood. “Civilians!” someone shouted, along with a stream of epithets, and soldiers ran up. More children—it ended up being six all told—started emerging, crying, their faces mottled with blood in long streaks. The troops carried them all off to a nearby sidewalk. It was by now almost completely dark. There, working only by lights mounted on ends of their rifles, an Army medic began assessing the children’s injuries, running his hands up and down their bodies like he was frisking them, looking for wounds. Incredibly, the only injuries were a girl with a cut hand and a boy with a superficial gash in the small of his back that was bleeding heavily but wasn’t life-threatening. The medic immediately began to bind it, while the boy crouched against a wall, his face showing more fear than pain. From the sidewalk I could see into the bullet-mottled windshield more clearly, and even my hardened nerves gave a start—the driver of the car, a man, was penetrated by so many bullets that his skull had collapsed, leaving his body grotesquely disfigured. A woman also lay dead in the front, still covered in her Muslim clothing and harder to see. Body bags were found and soldiers grimly set about placing the two bodies in them. 
 Meanwhile, the children continued to wail and scream, huddled against a wall, sandwiched between soldiers either binding their wounds or trying to comfort them. The Army’s translator later told me that this was a Turkoman family and that the teenage girl kept shouting, “Why did they shoot us? We have no weapons! We were just going home!“
 There was a small delay in getting the armored vehicles lined up and ready, and soon the convoy moved to the main Tal Afar hospital. It was fairly large and surprisingly well outfitted, with sober-looking doctors in white coats ambling about its sea-green halls. The young children were carried in by soldiers and by their teenaged sister. Only the boy with the gash on his back needed any further medical attention, and the Army medic and an Iraqi doctor quickly chatted over his prognosis. "Oh, this will be okay,” the Iraqi doctor said in broken English, roughly pulling the skin on the edge of the wound, causing the boy to howl. “We will take care of him fine.” The unit’s captain, Thomas Siebold, was adamant that the children be kept in a waiting room when the body bags, which were waiting outside on gurneys, were brought through the doors to be taken to the morgue. “They’ve seen enough,” he said. “I don’t want them seeing any more tonight.” I thought of Seibold’s office where I’d met up with him earlier, and the picture of his smiling 5-year-old daughter filling the entire desktop of his computer at his desk.”

Photograph: Chris Hondros/Getty Images

Like a self-fulfilling prophecy, the United States had helped create the very man it was now trying to kill
—  Jeremy Scahill, Dirty Wars

The federal government claimed $18,000 of my income as it’s own last year.  It took me 6x60 hour work weeks to earn that amount of money.  A single Hellfire missile costs $110,000, so I had the “privilege” of purchasing 16% of a weapon of war that very well may have killed a child, created an orphan, destroyed a hospital, given innocent villagers PTSD, created a terrorist, fostered hatred towards Americans, facilitated a war crime, increased the bonus of a military/industrial CEO.  God bless the USA.

Imperialist monsters!

A rant by the person I got this from:

It has long been preparing a text on sanctions against the DPRK. The fact that they often have no idea of ​​the readers of the fundamental facts. Hence, in the minds of not understanding the basic conditions and there are some naive myths (like the so-called "more efficient capitalist economy” or the so-called “love” of employees to the DPRK is cash foreign currency in the calculations). However, the destruction of myths - not such a complicated case, if we approach the problem in good faith, relying on its own strength and benign scientific basis.

Today found a significant Unfortunately, the previously missing text friend [info] chekhlan, written specifically on the subject of sanctions. In general, this colleague, I must say, truly identify the issues, giving a good “educational program.” After reviewing it, everyone will understand that the war crimes the U.S., which during the Korean War officially killed several million people, are continuing and now - in the form of conscious bringing North Korea (a country where 80 percent of the area are unsuitable for farming mountain) and starvation. They hope the United States, applying sanctions against the DPRK, the hunger will ever be caused by the inability to obtain food through the supply of goods to international markets.

Illustration guard material is taken from the exposure of war crimes in the U.S. Army in the city of Sinchon. Other pictures of the exhibition - click here.

On the sanctions. Inside Look

There is an interesting firm in American finance ministry, said Office of Foreign Assets Control, which translates into Russian as the Department for Control over foreign assets. As the name implies, this structure is completely engaged in certain activities: before it was called the economic strangulation of Washington objectionable, politically correct now called the struggle against international terrorism, proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and money laundering. The essence remains the same, the main challenge OFAC unchanged since its inception in 1820 - the fight against the enemies of the United States economically.

North Korea is known to be an enemy of the United States and a longtime enemy, so that it crushed in the economic sphere rather methodically and most importantly effective. You can argue about the causes of long isolation of the DPRK to blame the country’s leadership, ideology, etc. But it is worth to think about one simple question - how can it be drawn into the world economy state, which simply can not make any bank transactions?

Anyone, absolutely anyone a dollar translation of the DPRK will be immediately arrested and, at best, returned to the sender’s bank. This is a medical fact. Can you read carefully both sanctions resolutions on North Korea - there is none of that, there is a clause prohibiting transactions related to the purchase of prohibited items by resolution, but about a total ban on any kind have been settlements with North Korea there is nothing there, and could not be. We humanism, sir, you know. But the snag is that most of the international payments made in dollars, but it’s not the national currency of the world community, as well of the country - the United States. And it is enough to apply only domestic law, to reliably drive the DPRK in financial isolation.

The aims of the United States is quite certain - of course this does not prevent the spread of nuclear weapons and economic isolation of the country and undermining the socio-political situation in the DPRK, it would be difficult to understand the purpose of total sanctions literally applied them to unilaterally against Pyongyang. And here’s the scene appears on OFAC. The reality is somewhat not like some of our comrades have revised seen the TV and re-read the New York Times, in fact, not even enough reprimand, and a hint of the U.S. Treasury to virtually any non-government from arbitrarily arbitrarily sovereign state company that hour also gave a salute, and stopped all kinds of contacts with the DPRK. For 5 years I’m here, a situation seen any time and not two.

The latter case generally surprised, now the largest Danish bank refuses to take our orders, since they are paid for through Vneshtorgbank DPRK. Evrovye transfers among other things. Prior to that, they even referred to the European Commission decision, and now just wrote, saying the U.S. Treasury will not allow it.

By the way, my account in PayPal is blocked, only for what went into it with the North Korean IP. When I had hinted about his diplomatic status and illegality of such actions, politely hinted that against me, OFAC may start a private investigation, and all sorts of Vienna Convention and the UN Security Council resolution of absolutely no interest. That’s the rule of law.“

Watch on paulcurrier-blog.tumblr.com

The Tribunal should produce the first charges by any nation against Bush and Blair.  If the charges are found, then Malaysia will place formal criminal charges before the World Court at the Hague, and that would prompt a vote for arrest warrants from the Hague. This is serious business.  

No one has opened up 911 yet.  Opening up 911, would lead to discovery of whether Israel attacked the USA on September 11th, 2001 or not.  When that fact is established, the claimed legal grounds for the American War on Terror evaporates as do the claimed legal grounds for all the Bush/Obama Wars against other Nations, which have taken place since that 911 False Flag Attack Engineered by the Shadow Government (CIA/NSA) and the Mossad.

The Wars against Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Libya, Sudan, Somalia, Uganda, Syria, Jordan, and what appears to be on the Menu with Iran, would then all be illegal wars and acts of criminal aggression and crimes against peace and crimes against humanity.  Yes, Obama would be included.  Note, these are mostly nations where there is no Central Bank owned and controlled by the Rockefellers and Rothchilds, which means these families would be named in the International War Crimes Trials to follow.  When you add China and Russia to the strength backing Iran, we see the first real backdrop for World War Three (yes with nuclear weapons) or global revolution and world peace.  

4

March 16th 1968: My Lai Massacre

On this day in 1968, during the Vietnam War, between 350 and 500 Vietnamese villagers were massacred by American troops. The soldiers of the ‘Charlie’ Company killed and mutilated hundreds of unarmed civilians, many of whom were women and children. The massacre took place in the hamlets of My Lai and My Khe of Son My village, and was supposedly due to the belief that enemy soldiers were hiding in the area. The incident was initially downplayed by the army, with General Westmoreland congratulating the unit on their “outstanding job”. However, once the true nature of the horrific masacre was revealed, it sparked outrage both in the United States and around the world. The brutality of My Lai was a major factor in increasing domestic opposition to the Vietnam War, with mounting protests putting pressure on the government to end what many saw as a futile war. 26 US soldiers were charged for their involvement in the incident, but only one - William Calley - was convicted and found guilty. Calley was given a life sentence for killing 22 villagers, but only served 3 and a half years under house arrest; he made his first public apology in August 2009.

Vietnam War: “The Tactical Guide For the Korean Soldiers: Kill Them All, Burn Them All, Destroy Them All.”

Mad Minutes -> http://youtu.be/E05EPJ8Kxgk

A Korean film crew visits the site of a civilian massacre that occurred thirty years ago, during the time when Korean soldiers were fighting the Vietnam War in support of the U.S. army. As they recall the war, tension created by the camera and undying anger resonates in the testimonies of survivors and bereaved families of those killed. The crew also listens to ex-Korean soldiers, now peace activists, and together they confront their country’s past as perpetrator of violence towards the Vietnamese people. While reflecting on those absent from the screen, and silently protesting against ever-present wars in the world, the film explores the path towards peace and coexistence for the future.
Also known as Michin Sigan.

Korean War: “… US commanders repeatedly, and without ambiguity, ordered forces under their control to target and kill Korean refugees caught on the battlefield.”

BBC History: Kill ‘Em All: American War Crimes in Korea -> http://koreaunderground.tumblr.com/post/61835011194/bbc-history-kill-em-all-american-war-crimes-in

Declassified military documents recently found in the US National Archives show clearly how US commanders repeatedly, and without ambiguity, ordered forces under their control to target and kill Korean refugees caught on the battlefield. More disturbing still have been the published testimonies of Korean survivors who recall such killings, and the frank accounts of those American veterans brave enough to admit involvement.

9

GERMANY. Nordhausen. April 1945. Mittelbau-Dora concentration camp. A series of posts for all the Nazi apologists and Holocaust revisionists/negationists. [Part 1 of 5]

(1) (2) (3) Hundreds of bodies clad in grey and white striped prison uniforms are laid out in rows at Mittelbau-Dora concentration camp. This is what US troops found after they took control of the camp.

(4) Dying prisoners.

(5) A Polish boy and his father bury the corpse of the boy’s grandmother who died at Nordhausen.

(6) National Archives description: “These two staring, emaciated men are liberated inmates of Lager Nordhausen, a Gestapo concentration camp. The camp had from 3,000 to 4,000 inmates. All were maltreated, beaten and starved”. April 12, 1945.  

(7) (8) (9) Supervised by American soldiers, German civilians from the town of Nordhausen bury the corpses of prisoners found at the Mittelbau-Dora concentration camp in mass graves. The Allies insisted that the male citizens of Nordhausen bury the dead. Although the German civilians denied knowledge of the conditions in the camps, the Allies suspected they were fully aware of the situation. The camps and tunnels were less than two miles from the town of Nordhausen.

Photographs: United States Army Signal Corps/Library of Congress/United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

Mittelbau-Dora (aka Dora-Mittelbau, Nordhausen and Nordhausen-Dora) was a German Nazi concentration camp located near Nordhausen in Germany. It was established in late summer 1943 as a subcamp of Buchenwald concentration camp, supplying labour for extending the nearby tunnels in the Kohnstein and for manufacturing the V-2 rocket and the V-1 flying bomb. In the summer of 1944, Mittelbau became an independent concentration camp with numerous subcamps of its own.

There were no sanitary facilities except for barrels that served as latrines. Inmates (the majority of them from the Soviet Union, Poland or France) died from hunger, thirst, cold and overwork. The prisoners were subject to extreme cruelty. As a result they often suffered injuries, including permanent disability and disfigurement, and death. Severe beatings were routine, as was deliberate starvation, torture and summary executions. Common causes of death also included tuberculosis, pneumonia, starvation, dysentery, and trauma.

In early April 1945, as US troops were advancing, the SS decided to evacuate most of the Mittelbau camps. In great haste and with considerable brutality, the inmates were forced to board box cars. Several trains, each with thousands of prisoners, left the area through 6 April for Bergen-Belsen, Sachsenhausen and Ravensbrück (other concentration camps). Others were forced to walk through the Harz hills towards the northeast. Those unable to keep up with these death marches were summarily shot by the guards. The worst atrocity occurred at Gardelegen, known as the Gardelegen massacre. More than 1,000 prisoners from Mittelbau and Neuengamme subcamps were murdered in a barn that was set on fire. Those who were not burned alive were shot by SS, Wehrmacht and men of the Volkssturm.

Overall, although no reliable statistics on the number of deaths on these transports exist, estimates put the number of prisoners killed at up to 8,000.

As most of the camps of the Mittelbau system were completely evacuated, there were not many prisoners left alive to be liberated by the Allies. Only some small subcamps, mostly containing Italian POWs were not evacuated. The SS also left several hundred sick prisoners at Dora and in the Boelcke-Kaserne. They were freed when US troops reached Nordhausen on 11 April 1945. There were also around 1,300 dead prisoners at the barracks.

War correspondents took pictures and made films of the dead and dying prisoners at Dora. Like the documentation of Nazi atrocities at Bergen-Belsen, these were published around the globe and became some of the best-known testimonies of Nazi crimes.

The protective-custody camp leader, SS-Obersturmfuhrer Hans Karl Moeser, was sentenced to death by hanging. In his trial statement he said:

“The same way, with the same pleasure, as you shoot deer, I shoot a human being. When I came to the SS and had to shoot the first three persons, my food didn’t taste good for three days, but today it is a pleasure. It is a joy for me.”

In total, even conservative estimates put the number of people who did not survive being sent to Mittelbau-Dora at over 20,000. Thus, around one in three of those confined here did not survive.

Today, the site hosts a memorial and museum.

obama deported 3 million ppl. now that it’s gonna be trump doing the deporting, will white liberals finally start taking it seriously? what about american war crimes abroad – will white liberals finally put money into a unified opposition to our foreign policy now that trump’s gonna be the one killing kids with drone strikes? will liberals remember guantanamo exists now? will people stand up and actually support the next chelsea manning? will white people finally start pushing back against the distribution of military weaponry to cops? will all the clinton stans out there make a coherent effort to abolish the electoral college? or what??

anonymous asked:

but why the flag burning?

Well, since you asked anon, let’s make this a resource post for the atrocities committed in the name of this flag: 

Feel free to add any other reasons to have every bit of contempt for the American Flag and everything it stands for! Burn away! 

anonymous asked:

How do you feel about clones? Especially how they were humanized in spin off material both Legends as well as TCW?

That’s an interesting question! I think the clones are one of the reasons people should lay off George Lucas— they add a real layer of depth to the prequels that wasn’t exactly stated in the movie but I think was easy enough to read into all the same. 

For one thing, the clones, Jedi, and Chancellor make and interesting counterpart to the droid army, Sith apprentices and Sith Lord. Out of those six forces, who actually has real agency? Sidous/Palpatine, who is the same terrible fucking guy (you could make a case for Dooku, I guess, but given how badly he gets screwed in ROTS…)

First: clones and droids. Canon can be kind of erratic with how droid sentience is treated— mostly its for laughs, like that deleted scene where Anakin and Obi-Wan have a hearty lol after destroying a room full of them. The thing is, we know droids have enough self-awareness to be cognizant of their own mortality (is it mortality when they’re robots? Is that the right word? What I mean is, they know their consciousness can be destroyed). Given that all the battle droids are the same model and seem to have the same personality core, no one really cares when they’re killed

The thing is, I’m pretty sure people are thinking the exact same thing about the clones themselves. 

Clones are manufactured, given artificial life, programmed, and set out for one task. They’re the droids of TPM clothed in flesh, and that flesh causes revulsion in us. Suddenly all the same ethical nightmares inherent in a droid army become so much realer and closer when its actual organic beings being thoroughly dehumanized. 

The most interesting example of clone characterization/possible window into their views on droids sentience is that one arc that I can’t remember where a clone is caught taking droid fingers as trophies and stringing them on a necklace. The other clones find this repulsive— which doesn’t make so much sense, in a universe where droids are regularly destroyed, scrapped, and cannibalized for parts, until you realize its almost assuredly a reference to American war crimes committed during the Vietnam War. The original trilogy was written in response to the war and similar themes play out in the prequels— a legislative body incapable of providing any real oversight or action (alright, that could be any time in American history), a charismatic but manipulative and amoral head of government, a war that takes children who never understand what it is they’re fighting for and grinds them into so much meat. The clones are children— artificially aged but still only a few years old at best. They have no context of the Galaxy outside of what they learned (or were fed, rather) on Kamino. They have only their programming and Republic jingoism (what would actually happen if the CIS aligned planets were allowed to leave the Republic? Would it be…bad?). No one cares about their lives, and none of them actually understands what it is they are supposed to die for. 

Which makes them an interesting foil to the Jedi, as well— Jedi are similarly indoctrinated since birth, trained to be lethal just out of toddlerhood, whose entire identity is composed of being peacekeepers who preserve the Republic. I don’t doubt that the Jedi have an extensive knowledge of cultures and politics spanning the Galaxy, but given they they are never allowed to act on anything but “the will of the Force” (which, as the war drags on, becomes “Things the Chancellor says” or “whatever is expedient”), does it actually matter? An army of drones lead by living weapons. Fucking yikes.  

I don’t feel like that’s what you were asking at all— uhhh tl;dr TCW is fucking great, George Lucas is really great at metaphors 

Barbara Kopple b. July 30, 1946

Kopple is an American documentary filmmaker. She took a single class in Cinéma Vérité where she met a secretary who worked for the Maysles brothers and dropped the class in order to intern for them. After crewing on other people’s films for several years she co-directed the film Winter Soldier which documented war crimes American soldiers had perpetuated in Vietnam. She, along with the rest of the filmmakers, chose to keep their directorial credits anonymous and she is not officially credited as a director on the film.

In 1976 Kopple made her official directorial debut with Harlan County, USA, a documentary on the coal miner’s strike in Harlan County. Kopple and her crew spent several year ingratiating themselves with the miners and filmed them on the picket line as they were threatened and shot at. Kopple won an Oscar for Best Documentary for the film. 

Kopple did not direct another theatrical documentary until 1990 when she, along with Cathy Caplan, Thomas Haneke, and Lawrence Silk, made the film American Dream, which documented the unsuccessful strike of workers against the Hormel Foods corporation. She won an Oscar for that film as well.

Her 2006 film Shut up & Sing, which she co-directed with Cecilia Peck, documented the fallout the Dixie Chicks received after Natalie Maines expressed her displeasure of the invasion of Iraq and said she was ashamed President George W. Bush was from Texas.

She was nominated for an Emmy for her 2013 film Running From Crazy in which Mariel Hemingway discussed the long history of mental illness in her family going back to her grandfather, writer Ernest Hemingway. 

Kopple continues to work extensively as a director in both TV, theatrical documentaries and feature films.