american shooting

The 2nd Amendment is no longer the right to bear arms. 
The 2nd Amendment has become the right to take lives.
The 2nd Amendment is no longer aiding citizens. 
The 2nd Amendment is now abetting murderers.

When the laws don’t work, the laws must change. 

For those who may not be aware

There was a shooting that happened around 10/11 PM PST so most of us were asleep.

The shooting was on the Las Vegas Strip by Mandalay Bay at a Music Festival.

They recognized the shooter as a 64 year old man named Stephen Paddock.

Currently the death toll is at 50+ with more than 200+ Injured.

This is officially the worst mass shooting in American History.

June 12, 2016 marked the deadliest mass shooting in American history. It was at a gay bar, Pulse, and it was a hate crime. The shooter was an American citizen, targeting the LGBT+ population, who ended the lives of 49 people.

On this, the anniversary, please don’t forget. Don’t forget the 49 people who lost their lives, don’t forget the reason the shooter carried out the crime, and don’t forget that still, today, we aren’t safe.

This is not normal.

“The first thing I thought is, `Eric and Dylan, why did you do this?’ But also something ran through saying, `You guys finally did it. You did something”.

Erik Veik - A friend Of Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold 

I am from the UK and I was going to say that I am lucky enough to live in a country that has strict gun laws, but that would be a lie.

It is not down to luck. 

Almost 22 years ago on the 13th March 1996 a man killed 16 children, a teacher and injuring 15 others before committing suicide in Dunblane Primary School. 

It was, and still is, the deadliest mass shooting in British history. 

People were obviously outraged by the atrocity and by the next year it was illegal to own handguns (basically any gun not barrell loaded) unless they were of ‘historical importance’ i.e. made before 1919.

Owning a gun legally in the UK is hard. You must get a 5 year licence i.e. a background/capability check (yup it runs out), you must give a valid reason for needing a gun (i.e. the humane slaughter of animals/vermin); self defence is not a valid reason for owning a gun. You must be subjected to an inspection of your home where you have to show police where you are keeping the guns and ammunition, these must be kept in separate locked containers, and if you are needing to move the guns you must show that these containers can be moved whilst the guns are locked away.

Through all of this we have one of the lowest gun homicide rates in the word and last year only 26 people died in a gun related incidents (this includes air rifles and imitation guns), and most of these are from illegally obtained guns. It’s got to the point that if someone does die of a gunshot wound it is on the national news.

This being said we have a healthy National Rifle Association in the UK, but instead of demanding people be allowed to own weapons they teach marksmanship (traditional and modern) and promote shooting sports like clay pigeon shooting, which is very fun and we often have it at village fêtes.

The fact that gun control is still a debate in the US is astounding to me. 

The fact that Sandy Hook was 5 years ago and there is still a debate on whether gun owners should be subjected to background checks is astounding to me.

The fact that someone can get an automatic or semi-automatic weapon and shoot hundreds of innocent people from the 32nd floor of a hotel is astounding to me.

The fact that each year we hear on the news that there has been the ‘deadliest mass shooting in American history’ is astounding to me.

How is this even a conversation?

Call your senators, your representatives at all layers of government, tell them you want stricter gun laws, tell them that this can’t keep happening.

The best thing you can do to honour the victims in Las Vegas is to make sure something like this can never happen again.

10

Female School Shooters

As many followers of my blog know my interest leans more on the female murderers. Here are a few pictures of female school shooters.

Brenda Spencer - Cleveland Elementary School - 29th Of January 1979

Heather Smith - Spanaway Jr High School - 26th Of November 1985

Laurie Dann - Hubbard Woods Elementary School - 20th Of May 1988

Jillian Robbins - Penn State University - 17th Of September 1996

Elizabeth Bush - Bishop Neumann High School - 7th Of March 2001

Latina Williams - Louisiana Technical College - 8th Of February 2008

Teah Wimberly - Dillard High School - 12th Of November 2008

Amy Bishop - University of Alabama - 12th February 2010

Sunghee Kwon - University Of South Carolina - 5th February 2015

Dorothy Dutiel - Independence High School -  12th Of February 2016

Psychiatrist James Garbarino said female shooters “are so rare that it just hasn’t been studied,”. Whilst they are rare in comparison to their male counterparts, they certainly shouldn’t be discarded.  

USA. Ohio. Kent. May 4, 1970. Mary Ann Vecchio, a 14 year-old student, kneels beside Jeffrey Milley who’d been shot by the National Guard. Though the photo that first circulated turned out to be manipulated, this is the original, un-doctored version. This picture won the Pulitzer Prize.

The Kent State shootings occurred at Kent State University and involved the shooting of college students by the Ohio National Guard on May 4, 1970. National Guardsmen fired into a group of unarmed students, killing four and wounded another nine—some marching against the Vietnam War and American invasion of Cambodia, some walking by or observing the protest from a distance. 

Guardsmen had on the previous day used tear gas to disperse protesters and, by May 4th, rallies were banned and classes resumed. But 2,000 people gathered in what quickly turned into confrontation. Tear gas and bayonets were met with rocks and verbal taunts, which were met with more than 60 rounds of gunfire. In 1974, all charges were dropped against eight of the Guardsmen involved. There were 28 guards who admitted to firing on top of the hill, 25 of these guards fired 55 rounds into the air and into the ground, 2 of the guards fired .45cal pistol shots, 2 into the crowd, and 3 into the air, one guard fired birdshot into the air. The guardsmen fired 61 rounds over a period of 13 seconds, killing four students and wounding nine others, one of whom suffered permanent paralysis.

There was a significant national response to the shootings: hundreds of universities, colleges, and high schools closed throughout the United States due to a student strike of four million students, and the event further affected public opinion—at an already socially contentious time—over the role of the United States in the Vietnam War.

Photograph: John Filo/Getty

it’s been almost a year since the pulse nightclub shooting. a year since the largest mass shooting in American history. 49 people’s lives were lost. it’s been a year since their family has lost them. countries around the world lit up monuments in remembrance for these people. as the anniversary approaches tomorrow, please be safe. if you go to any pride events please be safe. dont forget that there are people who love you.

Rest in Power to the lives lost on that day. Don’t forget about them. 

  • Stanley Almodovar III, age 23
  • Amanda Alvear, 25
  • Oscar A. Aracena-Montero, 26
  • Rodolfo Ayala-Ayala, 33
  • Alejandro Barrios Martinez, 21
  • Martin Benitez Torres, 33
  • Antonio D. Brown, 30
  • Darryl R. Burt II, 29
  • Jonathan A. Camuy Vega, 24
  • Angel L. Candelario-Padro, 28
  • Simon A. Carrillo Fernandez, 31
  • Juan Chevez-Martinez, 25
  • Luis D. Conde, 39
  • Cory J. Connell, 21
  • Tevin E. Crosby, 25
  • Franky J. Dejesus Velazquez, 50
  • Deonka D. Drayton, 32
  • Mercedez M. Flores, 26
  • Peter O. Gonzalez-Cruz, 22
  • Juan R. Guerrero, 22
  • Paul T. Henry, 41
  • Frank Hernandez, 27
  • Miguel A. Honorato, 30
  • Javier Jorge-Reyes, 40
  • Jason B. Josaphat, 19
  • Eddie J. Justice, 30
  • Anthony L. Laureano Disla, 25
  • Christopher A. Leinonen, 32
  • Brenda L. Marquez McCool, 49
  • Jean C. Mendez Perez, 35
  • Akyra Monet Murray, 18
  • Kimberly Morris, 37
  • Jean C. Nieves Rodriguez, 27
  • Luis O. Ocasio-Capo, 20
  • Geraldo A. Ortiz-Jimenez, 25
  • Eric I. Ortiz-Rivera, 36
  • Joel Rayon Paniagua, 32
  • Enrique L. Rios Jr., 25
  • Juan P. Rivera Velazquez, 37
  • Yilmary Rodriguez Solivan, 24
  • Christopher J. Sanfeliz, 24
  • Xavier E. Serrano Rosado, 35
  • Gilberto R. Silva Menendez, 25
  • Edward Sotomayor Jr., 34
  • Shane E. Tomlinson, 33
  • Leroy Valentin Fernandez, 25
  • Luis S. Vielma, 22
  • Luis D. Wilson-Leon, 37
  • Jerald A. Wright, 31

The crosses of Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold after Columbine before they were taken down

It’s sad to think Eric Harris had less comments on his cross

This Needs to be Said

The shooting in Las Vegas was terrible, but it was by no means the largest mass shooting in US history. The Mandalay Bay loses no significance by not being the largest mass shooting in the US. However, the actual largest mass shooting in the US DOES stand a lot to lose by being forgotten, and the two events go hand in hand. 

In 1890 more than 200 unarmed women and children and dozens of unarmed men were slaughtered at Wounded Knee. 

US soldiers surrounded a Lakota village and demanded the men with firearms hand them in. One man, Black Elk, was deaf and didn’t understand what was being asked of him. The US soldiers tried to take his gun by force and in the scuffle it was accidentally discharged. The US soldiers then began to shoot the Lakota men at point blank range. The Lakota men who still retained their firearms returned fire and tried to take shelter. The rest of the village FLED

That’s when the commanding US officer lost control of his troops. The began to chase down and slaughter the fleeing Lakota without instruction to do so. No military order was given. Hundreds were murdered. 

Does that sound like a battle to you? When we hear the word ‘battle’ we tend to think of two opposing military forces, both armed and prepared for combat. Calling this event ‘the battle of wounded knee’ and not remembering it as a mass shooting erases the vile acts of the US soldiers. The fact that they happened to be in the military means nothing. In fact, some of these monsters received a medal of honor for the massacre (which, to my knowledge, have yet to be revoked despite urging from Native communities). 

What’s the connection between this and Vegas? The US soldiers are the people held up as shining examples to Americans, particularly white American males. While ‘Wounded Knee Massacre’ paints them in a negative light, ‘The Battle of Wounded Knee’ paints them as heroes. Even more recently military men who have expressed delight in killing get movies made about them. White men killing people with guns is PRAISED here. So take a white male, give him these men to look up to, and give him easy access to guns. Those things might not create a murderer, but they sure as fuck don’t help. 

So remember the Mandalay Bay shooting, the second largest recorded mass shooting in US history, borne of the same issues that caused the first.