american indian tribe

“I am Native American from the Omaha tribe in Nebraska. My Indian name means ‘shooting star.’ I wish the world knew that we do still exist. And, no, we don’t all live in tepees. When I see people in headdresses or Native American accessories, I feel disrespected. They don’t know the meaning behind it, how we wear it, or what we do to earn it. This is a real eagle feather. It doesn’t just fall off an eagle and someone says, ‘Oh, here — it’s yours.’ You have to earn it in my culture. I feel powerful when I wear it, more confident, and more connected to my ethnicity. I’ve never been embarrassed about being Native American. I take pride in it. I love how spiritual we are — it’s like we’re in tune with the Earth and the universe. I know there’s no other culture out there like mine.”

Daunnette Reyome

Makah Dancer

A member of the Neah Bay Makah Nation dons an eagle headdress at Olympic National Park. On August 18th, 2017 a dedication and renaming ceremony was held officially renaming the Olympic Wilderness to the “Daniel J. Evans Wilderness”. The Makah performed a blessing and presented a thunderbird totem to the Olympic National Park Service to consecrate the cermony. The Makah are native to the Olympic Peninsula.

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Seafair Pow-Wow 2015

Portrait of Ojibwe chief Hole in the Day, c. 1860′s. By Mathew Brady.

Source: National Archives and Records Administration.

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Generations ago, the American Indian Osage tribe was forced to move. Not for the first time, white settlers pushed them off their land in the 1800s. They ended up in a rocky, infertile area in northeast Oklahoma in hopes that settlers would finally leave them alone.

As it turned out, the land they had chosen was rich in oil, and in the early 20th century members of the tribe became spectacularly wealthy. They bought cars and built mansions; they made so much oil money that the government began appointing white guardians to “help” them spend it.

And then Osage members started turning up dead.

Find out more here.

– Petra