american dream

“The American Dream… induces a form of hyper individualism […] the idea that anybody of little means, with hard work and determination, can lift themselves to the highest rungs of bourgeoisie society (the richest of the rich). By focusing on individual stories of capitalist success, the Bill Gates and Sam Waltons of the world, the vast poverty and suffering required for the emergence of massive fortunes is left out of the picture. One can point to Gates and believe their own ascendance is possible without understanding its possibility is predicated on the systematic exploitation of tens of thousands of workers in mines and factories across the globe. And more importantly, focus on the few success stories of the super-rich invisibilizes the structure which keeps wealth within their hands at the direct expense of the poor and makes it beyond examination or reproach.”

– Overcoming the American Dream

I’m really wary of imagery like this

because I’m positive that liberals are in the process of leveraging the implied sentiment to oppose anti-establishment leftists too. In other words, Trump is an anti-establishment monster who is tearing down the beautiful values that this nation stands for, and leftists are likewise getting scarier when they declare things like “America was never great”. Liberal nationalism is one of our primary hurdles to overcome, this idea that America is (and always has been) a bastion of equality and progressive values. It’s powerful ideology, stuff that will keep millions locked in ineffective centrism over the next few decades. 

I know an image like this

will absolutely haunt the liberal imagination in the decades to come, the horseshoe ghost hanging over their shoulders – fascists ready to turn ever-progressive America into an unprecedented tyranny for the few, leftists ready to turn lawful America into chaotic mob rule that only works in theory. After all, if you want legitimacy in the capitalist electoral system (as liberals do), you will absolutely condemn grassroots organizers, socialists, and the like in terms that this second image implies, especially in the decades to come.

I saw a lot of this at the recent pro-immigration rally a week ago – people all over the place carrying signs with stuff like the Statue of Liberty weeping, implying that this isn’t what America stands for. One of the core goals of the leftist project ought to be to help people realize that, yes, immigration bans and racism are what America has historically stood for – at least in the sense of the American capitalist/imperialist state, because I do realize there has been beautiful resistance and solidarity among the masses over the centuries. The history is clear: America is built on centuries of genocide and enslavement, inequality and domination coursing through its veins. 

The American exceptionalism is unhelpful at best and super reactionary at worst. Abandon the Lady Liberty imagery and realize that we are already that tyrannical empire to most of the world, not this plucky melting-pot nation of progressive values.

2

Black millennials are more optimistic about the future than their peers, study shows

  • Young black Americans are feeling optimistic about the future — even more optimistic than their white, Asian and Hispanic peers, according to a survey released Monday.
  • The study, conducted by the University of Texas at Austin and Richards/Lerma, an advertising agency that works with brands to reach the U.S. Hispanic market, examined millennials and their relationship with the “American dream.”
  • The results of the study, which surveyed 1,000 millennial respondents between the ages of 18 to 34, challenged the preconceptions that the researchers had going into the study, as they said in the report. Read more (3/20/17 4:28 PM)

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4

Eighteen years ago, on New Year’s Eve, David Fisher visited an old farm in western Massachusetts, near the small town of Conway. No one was farming there at the time, and that’s what had drawn Fisher to the place. He was scouting for farmland.

“I remember walking out [to the fallow fields] at some point,” Fisher recalls. “And in the moonlight – it was all snowy – it was like a blank canvas.”

On that blank canvas, Fisher’s mind painted a picture of what could be there alongside the South River. He could see horses tilling the land – no tractors, no big machinery – and vegetable fields, and children running around.

This is David Fisher’s American Dream. It may not be the conventional American Dream of upward economic mobility. But dreams like his have a long tradition in this country. Think of the Puritans and the Shakers and the Amish. These American dreams are the uncompromising pursuit of a difficult ideal.

By Returning To Farming’s Roots, He Found His American Dream

Photos: Dan Charles/NPR

10

Ellis Island Immigrants
ca. 1905–14
Photographer: Augustus F. Sherman (American; 1865–1925)

Haters Can Choke 👋

if u see all of Camila old/new videos the girl is a genuine funny good person. Who has fairy wings like.. She’s born in Cuba. & Mexican aye
Camila cares about issues in the world & living the American Dream. Immigrated to America and having her dreams come true. Let The Girl Live. Y'all fake Bang wagging On hate smh.
Be supportive.

I’ve always resented the smug statements of politicians, media commentators, corporate executives who talked of how, in America, if you worked hard you would become rich. The meaning of that was if you were poor it was because you hadn’t worked hard enough. I knew this was a lie, about my father and millions of others, men and women who worked harder than anyone, harder than financiers and politicians, harder than anybody if you accept that when you work at an unpleasant job that makes it very hard work indeed.
—  Howard Zinn