america latino

Just a reminder:

Lin-Manuel Miranda wrote In the Heights to prove that Latinos aren’t knife wielding criminals.

Lin-Manuel Miranda didn’t want to focus on the guy selling drugs on the corner, he wanted to focus on the guy who owns the corner store.

Lin-Manuel Miranda wanted to show Latinos in college.

Lin-Manuel Miranda wanted to show Latinos wishing to change the world.

Lin-Manuel Miranda wanted to show Latino business owners.

Lin-Manuel Miranda wanted to show even though Latino culture is different, we are still legitimate Americans.

Lin-Manuel Miranda set In the Heights happen during July 3rd to July 5th.

Lin-Manuel Miranda shows the barrio celebrating the 4th of July.

Lin-Manuel Miranda also shows the barrio being incredibly prideful of their country of origin.

Lin-Manuel Miranda is saying being proud of one country does not invalidate the love for another.

In the Heights is as much of an American Musical as Hamilton

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Marcha do Empoderamento Crespo (“March of Crespo Empowerment”), in Salvador (Brazil),  March 13th 2016. Photos by Edgar Azevedo (@oedgaraz)

Obs: “crespo” is a word in BR Portuguese for the afro-curly texture.

Coup d'état in Venezuela

This is important and needs to be broadcasted all across the globe. This should be trending. Please reblog.

The Venezuelan Supreme Court actually took over the responsibilities of their Parliament, making it powerless. Maduro, the Venezuelan president, is said to have ‘couped himself’ by the opposition (who were majority in the parliament).

As you may know, the South American nation of Venezuela is going through a horrible economic and social crisis. Necessity products can’t be found there, money is basically useless, public services are shit. The government repressed all forms of protests, even the more peaceful ones. This, using the Supreme Court to dissolve the Parliament, is the final straw.

As a fellow South American (Argentinian), I empathize with their situation deeply, so I’m asking you to share this because the world needs to pay attention. Something needs to be done.

The people need to rise up, and the international community must support them through their transition into democracy. They need medical, financial, and all kinds of aid. Let’s stand by them.

when are people gonna stop spreading the “hot latina babe” stereotype? it is disgusting and offensive to an entire community. we are not hypersexualised objects. we are people and we deserve respect.  

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We don’t fit in a Census box, we break the mold

“Growing up Latino meant that your parents had an accent and worked three times as hard as everybody else’s parents, and you were supposed to be the great brown hope.” - John Leguizamo

See more stunning photos and GIFS showing the diversity of latinos here.

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Homosexuality in The Maya & Aztec Empire

The majority of information on the pre-Columbian peoples comes from the reports of the Spanish conquest. These accounts must be taken with caution, given that the accusation of sodomy was used to justify the conquest, along with other accusations real or invented, such as human sacrifice, cannibalism, or idolatry. 

The first peoples with whom the Spanish came in contact on the American continent were the Mayans, who were tolerant of homosexuality. 

For the Mayan aristocracy, at least, pubescent homosexuality was preferable to premarital heterosexuality. Parents would provide their sons with male slaves to satisfy their sexual needs, while premarital heterosexual encounters were discouraged. Adult homosexuality was also condoned, and the Maya were known to hold large private sexual parties which included homosexuality.

The Aztecs on the other hand were not surprisingly puritanical and although they celebrated public rituals with remnants of erotic content, they were perhaps more ruthless than the Spanish even, in suppressing private vice. 

Aztecs placed a high premium on “manly”, “assertive” behavior, and a corresponding stigma on “submissive” behavior. When conquered people were not sacrificed on temple altars, the males of conquered nations were often demoted to the status of women. The penalties for male homosexual intercourse were severe. Mexica law punished sodomy with the gallows, impalement for the active homosexual, extraction of the entrails through the anal orifice for the passive homosexual, and death by garrote for the lesbians. In Tenochtitlan, they hanged homosexuals. In nearby Texcoco, the active partner was “bound to a stake, completely covered with ashes and so left to die; the entrails of the passive agent were drawn out through his anus, he was then covered with ashes, and wood being added, the pile was ignited. 

The existence of lesbianism is testified to by the Nahuatl word "patlacheh”, which designates a woman who carries out masculine activities, including the penetration of other women, as revealed in the General history of the matters of New Spain by Bernardino de Sahagún. 

In spite of the puritanism of the Mexica, the sexual customs of the people conquered by the Aztec Empire varied to a great extent. For example, Bernal Díaz del Castillo speaks of homosexuality among the ruling classes, prostitution of young people, and cross-dressing in the area of Veracruz. The yauyos had prostitution houses full of men with painted faces and women’s clothing.

There was a general tolerance of homosexuality and transgenderism among Ancient Mesoamerica, but this harmony was disrupted by Christian conquerors, who forced their ways upon the indigenous peoples, turning homosexuality from a celebrated status to one of shame and death.

If Latin America had not been pillaged by the U.S. capital since its independence, millions of desperate workers would not now be coming here in such numbers to reclaim a share of that wealth; and if the United States is today the world’s richest nation, it is in part because of the sweat and blood of the copper workers of Chile, the tin miners of Bolivia, the fruit pickers of Guatemala and Honduras, the cane cutters of Cuba, the oil workers of Venezuela and Mexico, the pharmaceutical workers of Puerto Rico, the ranch hands of Costa Rica and Argentina, the West Indians who died building the Panama Canal, and the Panamanians who maintained it.
—  Juan Gonzalez - Harvest of Empire: A History of Latinos in America