amber nectar

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Hoya kerrii is in the milkweed family Apocynaceae. Commonly known as Sweetheart Hoya, it is native to southeast Asia. This species, like many other Hoyas, is a vining plant that can grow to over 2 meters tall. Sweetheart Hoya produces thick heart-shaped leaves, which make it popular as a gift for Valentine’s day in some parts of the world. Arguably more attractive are the terminal clusters of star shaped flowers. The flowers give off a sweet fragrance, and produce copious amounts of sweet, amber colored nectar that collects at the tips of the petals.

Game of Thrones 6x02

ME 2 DIS EPISODE TBQH:

Originally posted by karlrincon

  • I’m not a Suburban Bourbon Mom, but I am a Millenial Scotch Bitch. Covering my student-loan debt with swigs of the gods’ sharp, amber nectar.  Glenlivit 15 year. Mmmmmm.
  • THROW BACK TO KING IN THE NORTH AND CAT OMG OMG OMG I ALMOST CRIED REAL TEARS.  AND VISERION AND RHAEGAL IN MEREEN?? Y’all these flashbacks are getting a bitch HYPED.

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With more than 1,300 breweries producing some five-and-a-half thousand different types of beer, Germany is serious about the amber nectar. There’s even a word for it – bierernst – which means “deadly serious” and translates literally as “beer serious.”

This sober attitude applies particularly to the German beer purity law known as the Reinheitsgebot. Introduced in 1516 by Duke Wilhelm IV of Bavaria, the decree allows for only hops, barley, water and, later, yeast in every Stein. For 500 years, this recipe has served Bavaria very well, and for the last century, the rest of Germany.

But as 48-year-old Karlo Schorn, a patron at a Berlin bar, admits, tastes are changing. “German beer isn’t as good as it was 20 years ago” he bemoans. “Brands of beer have the same taste, or nearly the same taste. And good beers with awards now are not from Germany, they are from America or somewhere else.”

Germany’s Beer Purity Law Is 500 Years Old. Is It Past Its Sell-By Date?

Photo: Karl-Josef Hildenbrand/AFP/Getty Images