amazing-photos

Scan - George Harrison, India, 1976

Photo: Olivia Harrison / copyright Harrison Family

Scanned from Living in the Material World

“I always felt that in spite of all the fame, all the hullabaloo around that time and all the time for years following, George had something which we call in our language tyagi, which means the feeling of unattachment. He had everything - all the wealth, all the fame, whatever he wanted. But he was not attached to it. It didn’t seem to matter much to him, because he was searching for something much higher, much deeper. It does seem like he already had some Indian background in him. Otherwise, it’s hard to explain how, from Liverpool, with his background, and then becoming so famous, what reason did he have to get so attracted to a particular type of life and philosophy, even religion? It seems very strange really. Unless you believe in reincarnation.” - Ravi Shankar on George Harrison, Living in the Material World

Parts of a day!

I was under the impression that there were only 4 parts to day- morning, afternoon, evening and night. It blew my mind when i found out that technically there are ten parts to it!.

1.Dawn

The first appearance of light ( very weak light ) in the sky.

2.Twilight

It is the time between Dawn and Sunrise.

3.Sunrise

The instant at which the upper edge of the Sun appears over the eastern horizon in the morning.

4.Morning.

Morning is the period of time between dawn and noon ( 12 ‘o’ clock in the daytime).

5.Daylight.

Constitutes all the time that the sun is right above our heads.

6.Evening.

The period of the day between late afternoon and night.

7.Sunset

The time of sunset is defined in astronomy as the moment when the trailing edge of the Sun’s disk disappears below the horizon.

8. Twilight

The time between Sunset and Dusk.

9.Dusk.

Dusk is the darkest stage of twilight in the evening.

10.Night.

The complete absence of direct sunlight. (Since moon light is a form of indirect sunlight )

This photo shows a male orangutan in Borneo imitates local spear fisherman! 

Gerd Schuster, co-author of “Thinkers of the Jungle: The Orangutan report” says of the phenomenon: “Although the method required too much skill for him to master, he was later able to improvise by using the pole to catch fish already trapped in the locals’ fishing lines.”

via Reddit