amazing women in history

Katherine Johnson (b. 1918) is a physicist and mathematician who has made crucial contributions to several NASA missions, assuring their success with her highly accurate calculations. She worked with NASA for several decades, and helped advance the rights of both African-Americans and women.

She initially worked as a human computer, and later as an aerospace technologist. She calculated trajectories for missions such as the 1961 Mercury mission or the 1969 Apollo 11 flight. She was portrayed by Taraji P. Henson in the 2016 film Hidden Figures.

Fandometrics In Depth: Feminism Edition

Tumblr has always been a place where feminists could connect and speak freely. And as Tumblr has grown, so have the allied communities and the size of the conversation. From 2013 to 2015, year-over-year growth in the number of original posts tagged #feminism increased at an average rate of 4.22%.

That changed in 2016. As Tumblr discussed the US presidential election and its impact on women’s rights, access to healthcare and the importance of consent, the rate of original posts tagged #feminism grew 20%, five times the growth of the previous three years. Looking at the entire ecosystem of Tumblr tags, original posts and reblogs about #feminism accounted for triple the amount of conversation it did in 2015.

Originally posted by somethingincrediblyright

2016 also saw a change in Tumblr’s understanding of what feminism means.

The term intersectionality describes the overlapping systems of oppression at play in society—it’s the idea that gender inequality, racism, class status, and other injustices are inseparable from one another and can’t be studied in isolation.

Between 2014 and 2016 there was a modest increase in engagement around #intersectionality. Original posts increased 13%, while searches increased 44%. But then came the Women’s March. On January 20th, 2017, engagements around #intersectionality spiked 5191% from just two days before. Since then, the whole tone of the #feminism conversation on Tumblr has changed.

In 2017 so far, people are talking about intersectional systems of oppression 21% more than they have in the last four years combined.

Originally posted by micdotcom

How does that change in tone manifest itself? Here’s a sampling of posts that have gone viral since the March:

Continuing the conversation

If you’re interested in joining the feminist conversation on Tumblr, there are tons of places to start. In addition to the #feminism and #intersectionality tags, you can head to tags like #wage gap and #pro choice to learn more about specific issues. There are also dozens of Tumblrs that dive deep into the conversation:

  • Feminist Frequency (@femfreq), a place to talk about feminism in gaming
  • Celebrating Amazing Women (@celebratingamazingwomen), which highlights women who have changed history on their birthdays
  • Whovian Feminism (@whovianfeminism), which looks at inequality through a fannish lens
  • Empower. Volunteer. Unite. (@ucf-now), the official Tumblr of the University of Central Florida’s National Organization for Women chapter, and
  • Action (@action), our hub to help connect you to the resources you need to become an agent of change.

Valentina Tereshkova (b. 1937) is a Russian cosmonaut, the first woman to have flown in space. She achieved this on 16 June 1963, when she was launched into space aboard the Vostok 6 spacecraft.

She was part of a group of five, called the female cosmonaut corps, recruited specifically for the purpose. She spent three days on her flight, during which time she orbited Earth 48 times. She also obtained a degree from Zhukovsky Air Force Academy as a cosmonaut engineer.

theendeavor  asked:

Hi! I wanted to know why you (and others) are upset about Joss Whedon directing Batgirl? I never heard he was sketchy before.

Omg Joss. My worst ex. My most tumultuous relationship with the greatest betrayals.

Here’s the thing about Joss. I was a PEAK Whedon fan, I was a devotee. I was really sure he was a dream come true. Here’s a dude making mainstream geek content who was raised by a serious feminist, who supports woman-devoted charities like Equality Now, who writes directly to my aesthetic by creating teeny little super powered female characters who can kick your ass up your throat. I loved Buffy, I loved Angel, I love Firefly, and Dollhouse, and even Avengers 1 for a long time.

So believe me when I say he deserves the anger that is directed at him.

1. Buffy is an interesting, deeply flawed peice of media with definite feminist aims, but it is also deeply racist, dabbles in various kinds of sexism, and riddled with problems.

2. I’d actually be alright with that existing in the mid 90s because I know what the atmosphere was in television and Buffy was legitimately hard to get made, EXCEPT- nothing about the way that Joss does things has changed since then.

3. In some ways his feminism is WORSE? Like he’s always had hangups about pregnancy and birth that were confusing and offputting, but he’s never had a female character call herself a monster because of her own infertility- until he did exactly that in Age of Ultron.

4. He literally gave a speech to a room full of feminists suggesting that we junk the word “feminism” because he was not a fan, completely ignoring that the word feminism A- doesn’t belong to him, as a man, B- acknowledges decades of history of brave and amazing women who have come before us to whom we owe so much.

5. His (rejected) Wonder Woman script basically features Steve Trevor as the main character who spends the whole movie teaching Diana about pain and suffering because apparently indoctrination into the patriarchy is the only way to fix WW. It’s also- bonus! Super homophobic!

6. EVEN HIS SHAKESPEARE ADAPTATION WAS SEXIST.

7. When faced with criticism for Age of Ultron, he had a mantrum on Twitter, blamed the studio for every problem, and then ragequit Twitter, leaving a bunch of his asshole male followers to attack the feminists he claims to support for chasing him off.

8. Firefly, his apparently “pure” vision that was not interfered with at all before it was cancelled, was a thin allegory of the reconstruction era FROM the perspective of a confederate captain basically galvanizing and idealizing the “Southern independence” lie that Americans push to pretend that the Civil War was not about slavery.

9. Literally thinks this shot is a good idea:

Originally posted by singfromthehair

Mary Leakey (1913-1996) was a paleoanthropologist who made several important discoveries related to the evolution of humanity. In 1948 she discovered the first ever fossilised Proconsul skull, an extinct ape and an early ancestor of humans.

Even though she showed a great interest in archaeology from an early age and wanted to apply to Oxford, she was discouraged to do so, and was turned away from several excavation sites until finally being allowed to work. Throughout her career she discovered fossils and stone tools belonging to different species of early hominids, some of them more than 3.75 million years old. She discovered fifteen new species and one new genus of animal.

here’s to Sybil Ludington, a 16 year old girl who rode 40 miles alone, more than twice the distance of Paul Revere, 9pm until dawn on horseback while using a stick to knock on doors so she could wake up 400 men to fight at the Battle of Ridgefield. Her amazing accomplishment and help to the Revolutionary War will not be forgotten just because the education system likes to forget that women were an amazing force throughout history.

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Purim is coming - and it’s International (Working) Women’s Day too! 🎉 💪🏽 👸🏾 ✊🏾 So I thought I would share some images of Esther as a working woman - a scribe! - in tribute to the many women who continue to mentor and inspire me. These images are from illustrated megillot from Italy, Germany, and Holland, ca. 1650-1750: the earliest images, to my knowledge, of female scribes in Hebrew manuscripts (although I’d be happy to be corrected!).

So, I hear you liked TURN.


Apres the Season 4 finale, I know there’s going to be a lot of crying, and hand-wringing, and rewatching, and these are all good and proper things to do in the wake of a TV show you’ve enjoyed.

But after the smoke clears from all of that, you’re maybe going to go looking for your next 18th century fix, just something in between rewatches or while you’re trying to flesh out your next story idea. (Hey, now that we have our canon, go hog-wild on story ideas, guys, seriously.) 

So I’ve saved you some trouble and made you all a helpful list.

Obviously there are a lot of movies and TV shows out there - this is just a selection that I wish more people knew about.

Note: Everyone enjoys a show or movie for different reasons. These shows are on this list because of the time period they depict, not because of the quality of their writing, the accuracy of their history or the political nature of their content. Where I’m able to, I’ve mentioned if a book is available if you’d like to read more.

Before we get to the rest of the list, there are three excellent shows that are either currently on television or about to be very soon:

Poldark (BBC/PBS) is based on a series of books by an author named Winston Graham. It was made into a PBS series in the 70s starring Robin Ellis as the handsome Captain Poldark, who returns from the American Revolution to find his family farm in tatters and his long-time love interest married to his cousin. Drama ensues. The 70s series is worth your time, and the recent remake with Aidan Turner in the title role is also definitely worth a go. (If you like leading men who make terrible life decisions and the women who put up with them, this is totally your show.)

Harlots (Hulu) - If you really loved the TURN ladies, thought Lola and Philomena deserved more than they got, or are just interested to learn more about what life might have been like for the lower classes in London in the 1750s, have we got a deal for you. Harlots follows the lives of 18th century sex workers in this new drama, which was just recently renewed for a totally deserved second season. Female-lead ensemble drama. A little violent at points and deals with some pretty heavy-duty topics like rape, murder, and bastardy, but in a humane and understanding way. Totally bingeable.

Outlander (Starz) - Based on the wildly popular series of books by Diana Gabaldon, this time traveling drama jumps between a couple of different centuries and follows the story of Jamie and Claire, two very strong personalities trying to literally find their place in history. (Hewlett talks about the blade his grandfather picked up at Culloden; that battle forms a critical part of this show’s storyline.) It’s a real pretty show with very high production values.

And, without further ado, the rest of the list!

John Adams:  If you haven’t watched this already, do yourself a favor and go pick it up from the library. Starring Paul Giametti in the title role, this HBO miniseries follows John Adams’ role in the formation of America, through his early days in Congress up through his own presidency. As with any biographical show, characters that we know and love from other media (Rufus Sewell’s Hamilton comes to mind, but see what you think of David Morse’s Washington, too) are presented in a slightly different light and provide some food for thought about how history can be selective in how it remembers us. The costuming is great, the sets are fantastic, and the acting is first-rate.

The Patriot: An oldie but a goodie. Mel Gibson plays a highly fictionalized version of Francis Marion, the Swamp Fox while Jason Isaacs turns in a really stellar hottie we love to hate in Colonel Tavington. A little heavy-handed at times, this is a good movie to laugh over with friends.

Sons of Liberty: I’ll be really honest - for a show from the History Channel, the history on this show is pretty awful. But the cast is pretty. This one’s up to you, really. It fills a hole.

Garrow’s Law: William Garrow was a barrister and a pioneering legal mind in the 18th century, and this show (which ran for 3 seasons) is based on real Old Bailey cases and Garrow’s defenses, while also working in his fraught social life. Were you interested in learning a little more about Abe Woodhull’s erstwhile legal training? This is the show for you.

City of Vice: A miniseries that explains the origins and work of the Bow Street Runners, one of London’s first police forces.  Does a great job of opening up some of the early 18th century underside of London including a smidge of 18th century gay culture.

A Harlot’s Progress: William Hogarth was an 18th century artist, printmaker and social commentator whose “A Harlot’s Progress” famously depicts the downfall of a woman who goes into prostitution. This 2006 series explores the relationship that inspired the ‘Harlot’ piece.

The Incredible Journey of Mary Bryant: At around the same time America was busy trying to figure itself out, halfway around the world another one of Britain’s colonial possessions - Australia - was just getting started. Hundreds of convicts found themselves stuffed in ships and sent to the other side of the world - a sentence deemed almost more humane. This 2005 series with Romala Garai follows a very famous convict, Mary Bryant, and her experiences.

Banished: Another take on penal colonies in Australia. Currently available on Hulu.

Black Sails: A more recent offering from Starz, this show explores the backstory of the pirates in Robert Louis Stevenson’s Treasure Island. Lots of great representation issues, a whole lot of ‘how does your story get told’ - and there’s a real big community on Tumblr who loves it and very actively produces all kinds of fic.

Clarissa - Simcoe fans, this one is totally for you. Based on the epistolary novel by Samuel Richardson, Clarissa follows a girl of the same name as the infamous rake Lovelace tries to seduce her. Another look at what how women can be corrupted. Also, for you fandom nerds in the crowd, Lovelace was one of the first characters to inspire fix-it fic. Yes, really! Fix-it fic in the late 1700s. Lovelace is one of the original men for whom the ‘No, really, I can reform him’ trope was created. (Richardson, his creator, was so horrified by this reaction by his fans that he actually revised the book several times to try and make Lovelace even more villainous and irredeemable, with little success. Then as now, women apparently love the idea of a bad boy.)

Amazing Grace - The history of slavery in England and its colonies is complicated and nuanced; this story deals with one of the more famous names from that story, William Wilberforce, and his contribution.

Belle - Based on the true story of Dido Elizabeth Belle, the mixed race daughter of a Royal Navy Admiral. Another look at racial politics in England.

The Aristocrats - One of my all-time favorite TV miniseries and based on the nonfiction book by Stella Tilyard, this show follows the (actual, nonfictional) Lennox sisters, daughters of the Duke of Richmond as they grow up, marry, and adjust to rapid social change from the early 1700s into the 1790s.

The Duchess  - About the same time the Lennox sisters were out in society, so was Georgiana, the Duchess of Devonshire. This is based on (I’m not sure how closely) Amanda Foreman’s biography of Georgiana, one of the leading ladies of her day.

Dangerous Liasons - Another story about corruptible young women, this one has 3 very well deserved Oscars to its name and an absolutely stunning Glenn Close.

Barry Lyndon - a very evocative, sumptuous film by Stanley Kubrick. Short on action, but very, very Aesthetic, as only Kubrick can do.

The Scarlet Pimpernel - Based on the book by Baroness Orczy, The Scarlet Pimpernel is largely considered to be one of the world’s first ‘superhero with a secret identity’ stories. Sir Percy Blakeney uses his identity as a dim-witted fop to provide cover for his activities rescuing French aristocrats from the guillotine during the French Revolution. The 1982 version with Anthony Andrews and the 1999 version with Richard Grant are both a lot of fun.

Speaking of the French, where would we be without them? Our small domestic dust-up with Britain has far-reaching international consequences, setting in motion so many other social movements in Europe. The French, for instance, will have their own revolution several years after ours, which, of course, will lead to a total political shakeup ending with an artillery officer named Napoleon Bonaparte on the throne as Emperor. (You may have heard of him. He goes on to have his own series of large wars and, you know, completely changes the geo-political landscape of Europe. Like you do.)

La Revolution Francaise, filmed for the 200th anniversary of the Revolution, is available on YouTube in it’s entirety with English subtitles! Starts in 1774 and goes through the 1800s. C’est merveilleux.

Marie Antoinette - Sofia Coppola’s wild, modern romp through the life of one of the 18th century’s most notorious women. It may not be great history, but darn me if it isn’t fun to watch.

Farewell, My Queen - Another story about Marie Antoinette - this one is in French.

Nicolas Le Floch: An 18th century crime procedural set at the court of Louis XVI. The whole show is in French, so watch with subtitles, but the costumes are a lot of fun and it gives an interesting picture of the life a character like Lafayette would have left behind when he came to America. (He gets name dropped a few times, actually, though he never actually appears.)

Ekaterina: A 2014 miniseries from Russia discussing the rise of Catherine the Great, the Empress of Russia from 1762 to 1796, contemporaneous to the Revolution. The 18th century is a fascinating time in Russian history and Catherine is a really, really interesting lady. Totally go and read about her.

Anno 1790: A Swedish crime procedural set in 1790s Sweden and following Johann Däadh, a doctor recently roped into the police force. Däadh is a bit of a reformer, interested in the rights of man and giving everyone a chance to be heard. Costumes are fun, and there’s a really great slow-burn romance between two of the characters, one of whom is (gasp) married. This show only ran for one season, but it was a really, really good season.

If you’re still jonesing for period dramas after the rest of this list, here’s a lot of shows and tv series set during the Napoleonic Wars that are also totally worth your time - the Richard Sharpe miniseries, the Horatio Hornblower miniseries, the BBC’s War and Peace, Master and Commander, and then, of course, anything based on a Jane Austen novel.

Have fun!

Anita Brenner (1905-1974) was a Jewish-Mexican scholar who wrote extensively about the culture and art of her home country, being responsible for coining the term “Mexican renaissance” to describe the cultural revival after the revolution in the 1910s.

She had a PhD in Anthropology, and wrote a number of books, such as the 1927 Idols Behind Altars or The Wind that Swept Mexico in 1943. This latter book is the first complete account of the events surrounding the Mexican Revolution.

Edith Sampson (1898-1979) was the first black US delegate appointed to the United Nations. She was also an attorney, having completed Law School with a special dean’s commendation, all while working full-time as a social worker.

In 1924 she opened a law office that served the African-American community of Chicago. In 1943 she became a member of the National Association of Women Lawyers, one of the first WOC to do so. She was elected by President Truman to serve on the Social, Humanitarian and Cultural Committee of the UN in 1950, and 11 years later she became the USA’s first black representative for NATO.

Jane Haining (1897-1944) is the only Scottish person to be officially recognized as Righteous Among the Nations for her humanitarian actions during the Second World War and the Holocaust. She was a Church of Scotland missionary and teacher in Budapest, Hungary, and lost her life for her convictions.

She was responsible for the care and education of dozens of Jewish students, and refused to leave their side when the war broke out. She was eventually captured by the Gestapo, and sent to various concentration camps. She eventually died in Auschwitz in 1944.

Princess Aethelflaed, of Mercia

Æthelflæd, Lady of the Mercians, was born over 1100 years ago in dark-age England, an was the daughter of Alfred, the first king of England. She eventually ruled Mercia in the English Midlands from 911 until her death. She was the eldest daughter of Alfred the Great, an was born around 870 in the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Wessex. The name Æthelflæd is old English an means ‘noble beauty’ ~ an it is pronounced ‘ef-el-fled’. 

After the Battle of Edington in 878 the foundation of England was born, as the Wessex-controlled western half of Mercia came under the rule of Æthelred, Lord of the Mercians, who accepted Alfred’s overlordship. In the mid-880s, Alfred sealed the strategic alliance between the surviving English kingdoms by marrying Æthelflæd to Æthelred. Æthelred and Æthelflæd fortified Worcester against vikings raids several battle. 

After her husbands health declined early in the next decade, Æthelflæd was mainly responsible for the government of the Mercian kingdom. After Æthelred died in 911, Æthelflæd then ruled Mercia as Lady of the Mercians. The accession of a female ruler in Mercia is described by historians as “one of the most unique events in early early-medieval history”. 

Alfred had built a network of fortified boroughs and in the 910s King Edward and Æthelflæd embarked on a programme of extending them. In 917 she sent an army to capture Derby, the first of the Five Boroughs of the Danelaw to fall to the English, a victory described by historians as “her greatest triumph”. 

In 918 Leicester surrendered without a fight. Shortly afterwards the Viking leaders of York offered her their loyalty, but she died on 12 June 918 before she could take advantage of the offer, and a few months later Edward completed the conquest of Mercia. Æthelflæd was succeeded by her daughter Ælfwynn.

Historians agree that Æthelflæd was a great ruler who played an important part in the conquest of the Danelaw. She was praised by Anglo-Norman chroniclers such as William of Malmesbury, who described her as “a powerful accession, the delight of the kings subjects, the dread of his enemies, a woman of enlarged soul”. Like Queen Elizabeth I, she became a wonder to historians in later ages.

English actress Millie Brady plays her the historical tv-drama ‘The Last Kingdom’

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Asuka vs. Ember Moon - NXT Takeover Brooklyn III

4.5/5 (**** ½) - Always had a feeling these two would steal the show, and oh man this match was amazing. Easily one of the best womens matches in WWE history, these two just went all in on each other and it was easily the best thing on this show. Asuka worked the arm throughout the match, softening it up for his submission based offense. Asuka has now officially been classed as unkillable after kicking out of The Eclipse, locking in the Asuka Lock, and retaining once again. Nobody is ready for Asuka. Whats next for her? The main roster with the NXT title in hand? The winner of the Mae Young Classic? Who knows, but whoever faces her next might wanna get Scott Hall to bring a taser to help them out.