10

When I started Stargate, I got the part, I was sooothrilled to have this incredible character, to be playing someone in the military and I had so much respect, to be playing someone who’s so smart and so liberated and… I thought, “Yes!”

I had two weeks to move from Toronto to Vancouver. I flew out there, I had my first wardrobe fitting. And one of the things that was in… the thing that was in the wardrobe room was a very low-cut tank top and a push-up bra…

And I turned to the costume designer - whom I’ve worked with since, who’s wonderful - and I said, “What… What is this?”
And she said “Well, they wanna see what you look like in it.”
And I said, “…but this… nobody in the military, no captain in the US airforce would wear this… while her male counterparts are wearing crew neck T-shirts and… I c… I… I can’t do it!”
And she said, “Well, they just wanna see what you look like and take a picture and…”

I was like “…”

And I panicked because I thought I have just been given this amazing opportunity - I didn’t know it would last 10 years but I knew it was gonna be a kick-ass show - and I was like… “I can’t do it…”

And I started to cry and I said, “You have to go upstairs and tell them I’m not doing it. And if it means that they recast the part then recast the part but you’ve cast a smart woman and you’ve cast somebody who’s never tried to get a job based on her looks or her body. I’ve always played strong, smart women, I… I can’t do it. So if they wanna recast the part I totally get it but I’m not playing that version of this character.”

But I’m saying this while I’m blubbering because I’m suffering that I’ve just lost maybe the best job of my career…

And so she said, “Okay” and I said, “I’m sorry, I’m sorry, I’m sorry, I’ve never been difficult, I don’t… but I can’t do that!”

So she went upstairs and she came back down and she said, “Okay, no problem.”
And I said, “Okay, so what’s my costume?”
And she said, “Well…”
And I said, “Just… What are the guys wearing?”

So she handed me a black T-Shirt and the BDUs, which is what my character would wear in the field with her male counterparts, and that’s where we went from there.

But that to me was the defining moment of…

And I still cry about it because I still remember that young woman on the verge of breaking into the… new something big, being petrified that she was gonna loose it, but… I knew that I couldn’t play the TNA version of Sam Carter.

And to the powers-that-be, great credit, I don’t think that it was Brad or Jonathan or Rob or any of those guys who were asking for it, I think it might have been, you know, much higher up.
But to their great credit they were like, “No, absolutely not. She’s… okay, whatever she’s comfortable in.”

And… thank God that they went that route.
But that was… that was one of the defining moments.

~ Amanda Tapping ~
Shore Leave 2013

anonymous asked:

Don't you feel like Cas is getting smaller? I mean, I was sure before that he and Dean where almost the same heigh but Dean was a little taller than him, and last episode when I saw them standing in front of each Dean looked a lot more taller than Cas

That’s an interesting question. IRL, Misha is a strapping lad [183 cm], only 3 cm shorter than Jensen [186 cm] (and, well, much shorter than Jared [193 cm], but then again, isn’t everyone?), but the show has a habit of framing him so he looks a bit smaller than that.

Like, this is them IRL -

- and here is a normal shot from S12.

There are, of course, a number of reasons to cheat with how tall or short actors are, and some have to do with the general framing of the scene, not with the narrative itself. That said, you’re right - this SPN 12x19 thing was almost ridiculously out of proportion.

And the thing is, this is deliberate and meaningful, especially if we consider how carefully arranged other shots in this episode were - from Kelly’s face disappearing into the dark mirror (making her a identity-less baby bump) from Dean and Cas isolated inside that circle, Amanda Tapping has been super attentive and done a wonderful job. In this case, what is most apparent is the symmetry (two groups, isolated down the middle), the white light between Dean and Cas (which draws the attention of the viewer, is in the dead centre of the scene and also a perfect symbol of that distance forming between them), and the almost perfect descent in height of the characters themselves.

This creates a very neat visual effect and it messes with our psychology, because traditionally in Western visual arts the winners go left to right (it’s possible this has to do with our writing system, since in Etruscan art, it’s the opposite way around), as you can see on every Greek vase ever painted -

- but here, even though Cas has just defeated Dagon, we know something is not right and we know Sam and Dean are the ones being reasonable, so our brains instantly go, Wait, what? and this straight line from Sam to Kelly makes things even worse, because it’s a strong indication that there’s some kind of falling down and degeneration involved, and it makes Cas and Kelly look like they’re wrong BUT THEY’RE ON THE LEFT SIDE OF THE FRAME (*siren blaring*) and there’s an office inside your brain that’s busy busy busy trying to unscramble wtf is going on.

But - and here is where the magic happens - if you frame this shot in the ‘right’ way, the meaning changes and the thing becomes much less effective.

Keep reading