alternative flight

How Owls Could Quiet Wind Turbines and Planes

If you were a field mouse minding your own business and foraging for some food in the forest, the last creature you’d want to spot you would be an owl. The reason is simple–even as the bird of prey swooped down with talons open, you’d never hear it coming.

Owls have an impressive superpower in silent flight, made possible by specialized wings and feathers that disperse the sound of air rushing past them. Now an international research team says they have taken a tip from owls that could eventually lead to turbine blades and jet aircraft that produce significantly less noise.

“No other bird has this sort of intricate wing structure,” said University of Cambridge applied mathematician Nigel Peake. “Much of the noise caused by a wing – whether it’s attached to a bird, a plane or a fan – originates at the trailing edge where the air passing over the wing surface is turbulent. The structure of an owl’s wing serves to reduce noise by smoothing the passage of air as it passes over the wing – scattering the sound so their prey can’t hear them coming.” Learn more below.

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#OBspec Annotated Scripts! 

Despair is your familiar no longer, Clone Club. For all your behind the scenes OBspec commentary needs, we’ve got the whole package ready for you! 

NOTE: these scripts contain spoilers! If you have not yet read the full season of OBspec, get caught up here

Enjoy your journey! 

<<Episode 1: Savage in Some Cause - Annotated>> 

<<Episode 2: Determinants of Conduct - Annotated>> 

<<Episode 3: Party Known and Partly Knower - Annotated>>

<<Episode 4: Tinged by What Absorbs It - Annotated>>

<<Episode 5: An Alternation of Flights and Perchings - Annotated>> 

<<Episode 6: Separate on the Surface but Connected in the Deep - Annotated>> 

<<Episode 7: Solely for the Sake of the Ideal Harvest - Annotated>> 

<<Episode 8: As if She Were Full of Special Designs - Annotated>> 

<<Episode 9: The Sense of Perceiving Truths Not Known Before - Annotated>> 

<<Episode 10: Enveloped in a Wider Order - Annotated>> 

Cute Waiter

read it on the AO3 at http://ift.tt/1HoEzkw

by bellafarella

goddamit-mir said: prompt ;) Ian working as a flight attendant and crushing on the cute brunette working at the airport restaurant. One night the place is empty and ian decides to make a move <3

Words: 1054, Chapters: 1/1, Language: English

Series: Part 68 of Tumblr Prompts



read it on the AO3 at http://ift.tt/1HoEzkw

Freedom of Flight.

Alternate Entry (not submitted) for the recent Team Attack Pose at Gundam Exchange PH.

#gundam #gunpla #realgrade #toyphotography #toycrewbuddies #toyunion #mecha #mechas #robot #robots #bandai #gundamph #modelkit #japan #philippines #destinygundam #strikefreedom #strikefreedomgundam by jr_md http://bit.ly/1G2Dnw2

Solar Impulse lands in Hawaii, completing historic flight

The Solar Impulse 2 aircraft completed a historic flight in its quest to circle the globe without consuming a drop of fuel, touching down gracefully in Hawaii on Friday after the most arduous leg of its journey.

The sun-powered plane, piloted by veteran Swiss aviator Andre Borschberg, took 118 hours – about five days – to make the voyage from Japan to Hawaii and landed shortly after dawn at Kalaeloa Airport on the main Hawaiian island of Oahu.

“Just landed in #Hawaii with @solarimpulse! For @bertrandpiccard and I, it’s a dream coming true,” Borschberg tweeted triumphantly after completing the most perilous part of the around-the-world odyssey.

Borschberg and Bertrand Piccard have been alternating the long solo flights and Japan to Hawaii – where it was Borschberg in sole control – was the eighth of 13 legs.

“Difficult to believe what I see: #Si2 in Hawaii! But I never had doubts that @andreborschberg could make it!” tag-team copilot Piccard wrote on Twitter.

“This flight to Hawaii is not only an aviation historic first, but also a historic first for energy and cleantechs.”

The experimental plane landed a little after 1600 GMT, and Borschberg, all smiles, emerged a short time later from the cockpit, later adorning a traditional Hawaiian flower lei and holding a celebratory bottle of champagne.

Sunlight glimmered on the horizon as the Solar Impulse ground crew burst into cheers and applause upon completion of the groundbreaking flight.

The 4,000-mile leg (6,500 kilometers) from Nagoya, Japan to Hawaii was not only the world’s longest solar-powered flight both in terms of flying time and distance, it also set the record for longest solo flight by time.

The whole trip from Japan to Hawaii took four days and 22 hours, with the Swiss aviator taking catnaps of only 20 minutes at a time to maintain control of the pioneering plane.

Borschberg easily beat the previous longest solo endurance flight, by Steve Fossett, who flew for 76 hours and 45 minutes in 2006 in the Virgin Atlantic GlobalFlyer.

Fellow pioneering aviator and Virgin Group founder Richard Branson tweeted his congratulations to Borschberg and his team.

“Congrats @SolarImpulse, beating @Virgin GlobalFlyer record non-stop solo flight without refuelling. Huge step forward,” Branson wrote.

- Yoga in the sky -

The flight tested its exhausted pilot to the maximum, in what his team described as “difficult” conditions.

Traveling at altitudes of more than 9,000 meters (29,500 feet), Borschberg at times had to use oxygen tanks to breathe and experienced huge swings in temperature throughout.

Alone throughout the entire flight and utterly self-reliant in the unpressurized cockpit, Borschberg was equipped with a parachute and life raft, in case he needed to ditch in the Pacific.

Mission organizers described the journey as having taken “pilot and aircraft to the limits” of their endurance.

Borschberg, born in Zurich, is no stranger to adventure – 15 years ago, he narrowly escaped an avalanche, and then in 2013 he was involved in a helicopter crash that left him with minor injuries.

The pilot, who is also a yoga enthusiast, has worked as an army pilot and supervised the construction of the first Solar Impulse plane.

In 2010, for the first time in history, he flew 26 hours straight using only solar energy.

Borschberg didn’t let the tiny cockpit of the Solar Impulse 2 plane stop him from practising yoga, transforming his tiny bench into a yoga mat and using specialized postures custom-tailored for him by his personal yogi.

“Yoga is a great support for this flight above the Pacific: it positively affects my mood and mindset,” Borschberg tweeted Thursday with a photo of himself in a pose.

- Next stop: Phoenix -

The plane will now be flown across the United States and eventually, if all goes according to plan, land back in Abu Dhabi next March, where it started its journey earlier this year.

The next leg will be piloted by Piccard and will fly 2,920 miles from Hawaii to Phoenix.

Solar Impusle 2 has 17,000 solar cells and on-board rechargeable lithium batteries, allowing it to fly through the night.

Its wingspan is longer than that of a jumbo jet but it weighs only 2.3 tonnes – about the same as a car.

bur-jv/pst

Cyclists affected by BA flight cancellation

On Thursdays Nights British Airways flight to Gatwick was cancelled after the plane was damaged by a catering vehicle.

The incident happened at Gatwick, meaning the flight was unable to depart from the UK earlier in the day — as a knock-on effect, the flight from Bermuda was also cancelled.

BA spokeswoman Sallie Singleton said: “We would like to apologise to our customers for the cancellation of our flight.

“We are in the process of helping customers on to alternative flights.”

Those expecting to fly included members of Bermuda’s Island Games team, who are due to compete in Jersey.

Charles Dunstan, assistant manager for the cycling team, said: “Our flight to Jersey was scheduled for Saturday morning early, but it looks unlikely that we’ll get there by then.”

Customers can contact 1-800-247-9297 to rebook.

Passengers left stranded after domestic flights cancelled

Domestic flights across the country are being cancelled in the aftermath of a radar fault which grounded planes across New Zealand.

It has left passengers stranded across the country and looking to Air New Zealand for answers.

At Tauranga Airport, Wellingtonian Catherine Novak was made to wait for another two hours to catch a flight home that was supposed to have left at 4.55pm.

The delay meant she would not get home until just before 10pm, instead of her planned arrival time of just after 6pm.

Ms Novak, who was visiting Tauranga for an engineering conference, had considered staying another night but her company organised an alternative flight.

“Staying over was an option I was tossing up, but I thought it was just better to go home.”
The reason for the delay had left her puzzled.

“I’ve never heard of a radar being down anywhere else before.”

Earlier, passengers in Tauranga onboard a Christchurch-bound plane that was supposed to depart a plane at 3.25pm were told soon after they were boarded that the flight had been grounded.

One of the passengers, a Winton resident who had been holidaying in Papamoa, has decided to stay on another night.

“We were all boarded and ready to go and then they announced there had been a radar system problem, so they got us off,” said the woman, who asked not to be named.

“It doesn’t really upset any of my plans, and it’s probably quite good - I get to stay another night here.”

But it wasn’t so convenient for Kayla Gardyne, who was left worrying about missing her connecting flight from Christchurch to Dunedin.

The delay also meant that her two-hour drive from Dunedin home to Gore would be potentially much more dangerous later at night, in freezing conditions, said her grandparents Sibyl and Jack Grant, who saw her off at the terminal.

Her cousin David Manning was also at the airport farewelling his wife Moira, who was on the same delayed flight down to Christchurch.

The wait had been made all the more anxious by their children, Ailish, 3, and Patrick, 1, growing impatient and upset.

“They’ve been getting quite restless over it.”

At Auckland airport, Hemi Takarua had just learned the 4.10pm flight to New Plymouth had been cancelled.

He said he was stranded and hoping Air New Zealand would compensate him for the delay.

“If I’m staying tonight, Air New Zealand should pay. It was just a day trip for me. I’ve got to go home…I’ve got to go to work.”

Brent Snooks was on the same flight and was lining up to try and find another way to New Plymouth.

“They haven’t really offered any sort of alternate transportation to get down, or accommodation for overnight.”

Across the country, about 160 of Air NZ’s international and domestic flights had been affected. As the international flights cleared, cancellations were announced for a raft of domestic routes.

Air NZ flights out of Auckland, Christchurch, Tauranga and Wellington were among those cancelled. A Jetstar spokesman said six of its flights had been affected with passengers suffering at most a 90 minute delay.

In Christchurch, passengers who had checked in their luggage have been asked to pick it up from the baggage carousel and report to the Air New Zealand service desk.

Passengers to New Plymouth were told to report to the check-in counter for overnight accommodation.

First reports of problems came through about 2.50pm. Airways New Zealand reported the radar problem was partially fixed at 4pm and was completely operational again at 4.30pm.

Minister of Transport Simon Bridges said there had been an “outage to the nationwide air radar network”. He said the cause was unknown.

All departures have been suspended and the landing of any incoming aircraft is being staggered . Air traffic control is still able to communicate with any incoming planes via radio contact.“ He said he had been assured passengers were never at risk.

Jill Dixon and her grandson Jacob Ellery said their flight to Tauranga was cancelled this morning for reasons unexplained, then the radar glitch hit, delaying a second flight.

She and Jacob learned only a few minutes before boarding a 3.35pm flight that they would have to stay put.

Palmerston North’s Ms Dixon said Air New Zealand should put her and Jacob up for the night and pay her airport parking fees which she estimated had increased by $45.

Brisbane resident Anna Lane had planned to fly from Wellington to Napier to visit her mum, who is recovering from a hip operation. She says she only just arrived in Wellington when she found out her next flight was cancelled.

As it became clear international flights would take priority, Ms Lane said she expected to be delayed for hours. "There’s nothing we can do so there’s no use getting upset about it.” She said she would hire a car and drive to Hawkes Bay rather than spend a night in Wellington.

At Christchurch International Airport, dozens of travellers had formed snaking queues at carriers’ help desks.

Simon and Hilary Vallily, along with Bree (2 ½) and baby Elsie, left Rarotonga at 3.30am. They were about to get on their third flight, from Christchurch to Dunedin, when their flight got cancelled and were now trying to work out how to get home.“We might have to stay the night in Christchurch - these kids need to go to bed,” he says.

Also at Christchurch, Geoff Neilson decided against waiting for a new flight to be scheduled and was planning on renting a car to drive to Dunedin. “We can hire a car and be well on the road but the time things are sorted here. There’s nothing you can do about it.” (News Source : NZ Herald )

archiveofourown.org
Mile High Stiles - AzulMountain - Teen Wolf (TV) [Archive of Our Own]
An Archive of Our Own, a project of the Organization for Transformative Works
By Organization for Transformative Works

Chapters: 7/7
Fandom: Teen Wolf (TV)
Rating: Mature
Warnings: Creator Chose Not To Use Archive Warnings
Relationships: Peter Hale/Stiles Stilinski, Derek Hale/Stiles Stilinski, Vernon Boyd/Cora Hale, maybe Derek Hale/Peter Hale/Stiles Stilinski
Characters: Derek Hale, Stiles Stilinski, Peter Hale, Cora Hale, Erica Reyes, Isaac Lahey, Lydia Martin, Vernon Boyd, Allison Argent, Jackson Whittemore, Original Characters, Chris Argent
Additional Tags: alternative universe, Werewolves, Flight Attendant!Stiles, Chief Purser!Allison, Pilot!Jackson, Pilot!Scott, werewolf toddler!Lydia, werewolf kid!Erica, werewolf kid!Isaac, Mentions of Death, Alternate Hale Fire, Laura is dead, Peter’s wife is dead, ex-hunter!Allison, aircrash, blizzard, Survival, rival pack, Porn With Plot, Mile High Club, Pack Cuddles, Exhibitionism, Magical Stiles Stilinski, Mates
Summary:

Flight attendant Stiles Stilinkski’s day couldn’t get any worse when he spots the smoldering gaze of the asshole who assaulted him earlier and claimed he was kidnapping the strawberry blonde toddler. Then the father of the toddler saunters through the plane’s front door and says something about his good service a mile high. Really how could things get worse? Rival werewolves and a plane crash are just the beginning of Stiles horrible day.

Solar Impulse arrives in Hawaii, completing historic flight

Science

Solar Impulse arrives in Hawaii, completing historic flight

The Solar Impulse 2 aircraft completed a historic flight in its quest to circle the globe without consuming a drop of fuel, touching down gracefully in Hawaii on Friday after the most arduous leg of its journey. The sun-powered plane, piloted by veteran Swiss aviator Andre Borschberg, took five days to make the historic voyage from Japan to Hawaii and landed shortly after dawn at Kalaeloa Airport on the main Hawaiian island of Oahu. Borschberg and Bertrand Piccard have been alternating the long solo flights aboard the plane. The flight from Japan to Hawaii was the eighth of 13 legs.

This flight to Hawaii is not only an aviation historic first but also a historic first for energy and cleantechs.

Bertrand Piccard

The completed 4,000-mile leg from Nagoya, Japan, to Hawaii was not only the world’s longest solar-powered flight both by time and distance; it also set the record for longest solo flight by time. Mission organizers described the journey as having taken “pilot and aircraft to the limits” of their endurance under what the flight’s team described as “difficult” conditions. The whole trip from Japan to Hawaii took about four days and 22 hours, with the Swiss aviator taking catnaps of only 20 minutes at a time to maintain control of the pioneering plane. Borschberg easily beat the previous longest solo endurance flight by Steve Fossett, who flew for 76 hours and 45 minutes in 2006.

Solar Impulse arrives in Hawaii, completing historic flight

Science

Solar Impulse arrives in Hawaii, completing historic flight

The Solar Impulse 2 aircraft completed a historic flight in its quest to circle the globe without consuming a drop of fuel, touching down gracefully in Hawaii on Friday after the most arduous leg of its journey. The sun-powered plane, piloted by veteran Swiss aviator Andre Borschberg, took five days to make the historic voyage from Japan to Hawaii and landed shortly after dawn at Kalaeloa Airport on the main Hawaiian island of Oahu. Borschberg and Bertrand Piccard have been alternating the long solo flights aboard the plane. The flight from Japan to Hawaii was the eighth of 13 legs.

This flight to Hawaii is not only an aviation historic first but also a historic first for energy and cleantechs.

Bertrand Piccard

The completed 4,000-mile leg from Nagoya, Japan, to Hawaii was not only the world’s longest solar-powered flight both by time and distance; it also set the record for longest solo flight by time. Mission organizers described the journey as having taken “pilot and aircraft to the limits” of their endurance under what the flight’s team described as “difficult” conditions. The whole trip from Japan to Hawaii took about four days and 22 hours, with the Swiss aviator taking catnaps of only 20 minutes at a time to maintain control of the pioneering plane. Borschberg easily beat the previous longest solo endurance flight by Steve Fossett, who flew for 76 hours and 45 minutes in 2006.

Solar Impulse arrives in Hawaii, completing historic flight

Science

Solar Impulse arrives in Hawaii, completing historic flight

The Solar Impulse 2 aircraft completed a historic flight in its quest to circle the globe without consuming a drop of fuel, touching down gracefully in Hawaii on Friday after the most arduous leg of its journey. The sun-powered plane, piloted by veteran Swiss aviator Andre Borschberg, took five days to make the historic voyage from Japan to Hawaii and landed shortly after dawn at Kalaeloa Airport on the main Hawaiian island of Oahu. Borschberg and Bertrand Piccard have been alternating the long solo flights aboard the plane. The flight from Japan to Hawaii was the eighth of 13 legs.

This flight to Hawaii is not only an aviation historic first but also a historic first for energy and cleantechs.

Bertrand Piccard

The completed 4,000-mile leg from Nagoya, Japan, to Hawaii was not only the world’s longest solar-powered flight both by time and distance; it also set the record for longest solo flight by time. Mission organizers described the journey as having taken “pilot and aircraft to the limits” of their endurance under what the flight’s team described as “difficult” conditions. The whole trip from Japan to Hawaii took about four days and 22 hours, with the Swiss aviator taking catnaps of only 20 minutes at a time to maintain control of the pioneering plane. Borschberg easily beat the previous longest solo endurance flight by Steve Fossett, who flew for 76 hours and 45 minutes in 2006.

Solar Impulse arrives in Hawaii, completing historic flight

The Solar Impulse 2 aircraft completed an historic flight in its quest to circle the globe without consuming a drop of fuel, touching down gracefully in Hawaii on Friday after the most arduous leg of its journey.

The sun-powered plane, piloted by veteran Swiss aviator Andre Borschberg, took five days to make the historic voyage from Japan to Hawaii and landed shortly after dawn at Kalaeloa Airport on the main Hawaiian island of Oahu.

“Just landed in #Hawaii with @solarimpulse! For @bertrandpiccard and I, it’s a dream coming true,” Borschberg tweeted triumphantly upon after completing the most dangerous leg of the around-the-world journey.

Borschberg and Bertrand Piccard have been alternating the long solo flights aboard the plane. The flight from Japan to Hawaii was the eighth of 13 legs.

His colleague and tag-team copilot on the venture, Piccard expressed elation over the arrival of aircraft and pilot.

“Difficult to believe what I see: #Si2 in Hawaii! But I never had doubts that @andreborschberg could make it!” he wrote on Twitter.

“This flight to Hawaii is not only an aviation historic first, but also a historic first for energy and cleantechs,” wrote Piccard.

The experimental plane touched down in Hawaii shortly after dawn – a little after 1600 GMT – amid cheers and applause from the ground crew. Borschberg, all smiles, emerged a short time time later from the cockpit.

Sunlight glimmered on the horizon as the Solar Impulse ground crew burst into cheers and applause upon completion of the groundbreaking flight, whose progress was streamed live at the solar impulse website.

The plane landed around noon ET at Hawaii’s Kalaeloa Airport after an arduous five-day, non-stop flight, according to Solar Impulse’s website, which livestreamed the event.

The completed 4,000-mile leg from Nagoya, Japan, to Hawaii was not only the world’s longest solar-powered flight both by time and distance, it also set the record for longest solo flight by time.

As the flight neared its destination, the Solar Impulse team tweeted images and videos of the plane over Hawaii.

Earlier Friday, founder of Virgin Group Richard Branson congratulated the Solar Impulse team on Twitter for beating Virgin’s record non-stop solo flight without refueling.

“The #solarteam made it. WE MADE IT, YOU MADE IT THANKS TO YOUR SUPPORT!"read a message posted under the Twitter handle @solarimpulse.

The aircraft over the course of the journey set records for longest solo flight and most time in a solar-powered flight.

The flight tested its exhausted pilot to the limit, in what his team described as "difficult” conditions.

- Endurance test for pilot, aircraft -

Mission organizers described the journey as having taken “pilot and aircraft to the limits” of their endurance.

The whole trip from Japan to Hawaii took about four days and 22 hours, with the Swiss aviator taking catnaps of only 20 minutes at a time to maintain control of the pioneering plane.

Borschberg easily beat the previous longest solo endurance flight by Steve Fossett, who flew for 76 hours and 45 minutes in 2006.

Fellow pioneering aviator and rival Richard Branson tweeted his congratulations to Borschberg just before his competitor touched down.

“Congrats @SolarImpulse, beating @Virgin GlobalFlyer record non-stop solo flight without refuelling. Huge step forward.”

Alone throughout the entire flight and utterly self-reliant in the unpressurized cockpit, Borschberg was equipped with a parachute and life raft, in case he needed to ditch in the Pacific.

The solar-powered aircraft left Japan around 1800 GMT Sunday – the early hours of Monday local time – after spending a month in the central city of Nagoya.

The propeller-driven plane was originally scheduled to fly directly from Nanjing in China to Hawaii, but bad weather along the way forced a diversion to Japan that stretched to a month.

Traveling at altitudes of more than 9,000 meters (29,500 feet), Borschberg at times had to use oxygen tanks to breathe and experienced huge swings in temperature throughout.

Solar Impulse 2 set off from Abu Dhabi earlier this year in a multi-leg attempt to fly around the world without a single drop of fuel.

It has 17,000 solar cells and on-board rechargeable lithium batteries, allowing it to fly through the night.

Its wingspan is longer than that of a jumbo jet but it weighs only 2.3 tonnes – about the same as a car.

Solar Impulse lands in Hawaii, completing historic flight

The Solar Impulse 2 aircraft completed a historic flight in its quest to circle the globe without consuming a drop of fuel, touching down gracefully in Hawaii on Friday after the most arduous leg of its journey.
The sun-powered plane, piloted by veteran Swiss aviator Andre Borschberg, took 118 hours – about five days – to make the voyage from Japan to Hawaii and landed shortly after dawn at Kalaeloa Airport on the main Hawaiian island of Oahu.
“Just landed in #Hawaii with @solarimpulse! For @bertrandpiccard and I, it’s a dream coming true,” Borschberg tweeted triumphantly after completing the most perilous part of the around-the-world odyssey.
Borschberg and Bertrand Piccard have been alternating the long solo flights and Japan to Hawaii – where it was Borschberg in sole control – was the eighth of 13 legs.
“Difficult to believe what I see: #Si2 in Hawaii! But I never had doubts that @andreborschberg could make it!” tag-team copilot Piccard wrote on Twitter.
“This flight to Hawaii is not only an aviation historic first, but also a historic first for energy and cleantechs.”
The experimental plane landed a little after 1600 GMT, and Borschberg, all smiles, emerged a short time later from the cockpit, later adorning a traditional Hawaiian flower lei and holding a celebratory bottle of champagne.
Sunlight glimmered on the horizon as the Solar Impulse ground crew burst into cheers and applause upon completion of the groundbreaking flight.
The 4,000-mile leg (6,500 kilometers) from Nagoya, Japan to Hawaii was not only the world’s longest solar-powered flight both in terms of flying time and distance, it also set the record for longest solo flight by time.
The whole trip from Japan to Hawaii took four days and 22 hours, with the Swiss aviator taking catnaps of only 20 minutes at a time to maintain control of the pioneering plane.
Borschberg easily beat the previous longest solo endurance flight, by Steve Fossett, who flew for 76 hours and 45 minutes in 2006 in the Virgin Atlantic GlobalFlyer.
Fellow pioneering aviator and Virgin Group founder Richard Branson tweeted his congratulations to Borschberg and his team.
“Congrats @SolarImpulse, beating @Virgin GlobalFlyer record non-stop solo flight without refuelling. Huge step forward,” Branson wrote.

- Yoga in the sky -
The flight tested its exhausted pilot to the maximum, in what his team described as “difficult” conditions.
Traveling at altitudes of more than 9,000 meters (29,500 feet), Borschberg at times had to use oxygen tanks to breathe and experienced huge swings in temperature throughout.
Alone throughout the entire flight and utterly self-reliant in the unpressurized cockpit, Borschberg was equipped with a parachute and life raft, in case he needed to ditch in the Pacific.
Mission organizers described the journey as having taken “pilot and aircraft to the limits” of their endurance.
Borschberg, born in Zurich, is no stranger to adventure – 15 years ago, he narrowly escaped an avalanche, and then in 2013 he was involved in a helicopter crash that left him with minor injuries.
The pilot, who is also a yoga enthusiast, has worked as an army pilot and supervised the construction of the first Solar Impulse plane.
In 2010, for the first time in history, he flew 26 hours straight using only solar energy.
Borschberg didn’t let the tiny cockpit of the Solar Impulse 2 plane stop him from practising yoga, transforming his tiny bench into a yoga mat and using specialized postures custom-tailored for him by his personal yogi.
“Yoga is a great support for this flight above the Pacific: it positively affects my mood and mindset,” Borschberg tweeted Thursday with a photo of himself in a pose.

- Next stop: Phoenix -
The plane will now be flown across the United States and eventually, if all goes according to plan, land back in Abu Dhabi next March, where it started its journey earlier this year.
The next leg will be piloted by Piccard and will fly 2,920 miles from Hawaii to Phoenix.
Solar Impulse 2 has 17,000 solar cells and on-board rechargeable lithium batteries, allowing it to fly through the night.
Its wingspan is longer than that of a jumbo jet but it weighs only 2.3 tonnes – about the same as a car.