alternate truth

Stefan Molyneux introduces James O'Keefe at the “American Pravda: My Fight for Truth in the Era of Fake News” book launch in New York City at the Mandarin Oriental hotel on January 18th, 2018. Order “American Pravda: My Fight for Truth in the Era of Fake News" 

James O'Keefe talks to supporters and members of the media about the work Project Veritas does and about our new book, "American Pravda: My Fight for Truth in the Era of Fake News” on January 18th 2018 in NYC.
Pre-order the book: http://www.americanpravdabook.com

The True Story of Nikola Tesla (In A Nutshell)

In the past, Direct Current was thought to be the future of power transmission. Then a young pimp named Nikola Tesla stepped in and showed that Alternating Current was the future. The inventor was ridiculed, bashed and attacked for years by dipsh**s who were blinded by commercial interests, but Tesla rose above the dense f***s and proved that AC was far more superior than DC. Eventually, all scientists/engineers with any intellect realized AC’s advantages to DC, and all the corporate derps of that time instantly switched to AC to reap benefits off Tesla’s work. So while everyone else was finally catching up to the young pimp, Tesla had already moved on to new discoveries in power transmission–World Wireless Technology, but the commercial development of AC had taken full force, and the development of power transmission could not misdirect again to Tesla’s new developments like it had from DC to AC. The pimp was pushed aside and ignored while the children played with his kid toys. So the Industrial Revolution continued to strive off Tesla’s primitive work instead of following him in his newly developed technology, and the future was mislead in a unrefined direction in power transmission. Now the future is a hundred years behind with no site of returning back to the technology Tesla wanted to bring the world.

And this… is the true story of Nikola Tesla (in a nutshell).

How to tell fake news from real news

In November 2016, Stanford University researchers made an alarming discovery: across the US, many students can’t tell the difference between a reported news article, a persuasive opinion piece, and a corporate ad. This lack of media literacy makes young people vulnerable to getting duped by “fake news” — which can have real consequences.


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Want to strengthen your own ability to tell real news from fake news? Start by asking these five questions of any news item.


Animation by Patrick Smith

Who wrote it? Real news contains the real byline of a real journalist dedicated to the truth. Fake news (including “sponsored content” and traditional corporate ads) does not. Once you find the byline, look at the writer’s bio. This can help you identify whether the item you’re reading is a reported news article (written by a journalist with the intent to inform), a persuasive opinion piece (written by an industry expert with a point of view), or something else entirely.

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What claims does it make? Real news — like these Pulitzer Prize winning articles — will include multiple primary sources when discussing a controversial claim. Fake news may include fake sources, false urls, and/or “alternative facts” that can be disproven through further research. When in doubt, dig deeper. Facts can be verified.

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When was it published? Look at the publication date. If it’s breaking news, be extra careful. Use this tipsheet to decode breaking news.

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Where was it published? Real news is published by trustworthy media outlets with a strong fact-checking record, such as the BBC, NPR, ProPublica, Mother Jones, and Wired. (To learn more about any media outlet, look at their About page and examine their published body of work.) If you get your news primarily via social media, try to verify that the information is accurate before you share it. (On Twitter, for example, you might look for the blue “verified” checkmark next to a media outlet name to double-check a publication source before sharing a link.)

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How does it make you feel? Fake news, like all propaganda, is designed to make you feel strong emotions. So if you read a news item that makes you feel super angry, pause and take a deep breath. Then, double-check the item’s claims by comparing it to the news on any three of the media outlets listed above — and decide for yourself if the item is real news or fake news. Bottom line: Don’t believe everything you read. There is no substitute for critical thinking.

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If you get in the habit of asking all 5 of these questions whenever you read a news article, then your basic news literacy skills will start to grow stronger. However, these are just the basics! To dive deeper into news and media literacy, watch the TED-Ed Lesson: How to choose your news. To find out more about what students need, read the Stanford University report, published here.

Animation by Augenblick Studios

Laura McClure is an award-winning journalist and the TED-Ed Editor. To learn something new every week, sign up here for the TED-Ed Newsletter.

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