also this was in my drafts

Favs

Tagged by @hermajestymanon

This is so late…. I’ve had it in my drafts and just now remembered. Oops

rules: pick 15 characters from 15 different fandoms and then tag 5 people to do the same

Oh god… (does this include tv fandoms.. imma say yes) and sorry not sorry my top two are from the same fandom also otpppp

1: Rowan Whitethorn (Throne of Glass)
2: Aelin Galathynius (Throne of Glass)
3: Rhysand (ACOTAR)
4: Damon Salvatore (Vampire Diaries)
5: Bellamy Blake (The 100)
6: Will Herondale (The Infernal Devices)
7: Percy Jackson (Percy Jackson and the Olympians)
8: Hermione Granger (Harry Potter)
9: Magnus Bane (The Mortal Instruments)
10: Magnus Chase (Magnus Chase and the Gods of Asgard)
11: River Song (Doctor Who)
12: Daenerys Targaryen (Game of Thrones)
13: Sherlock Holmes (Sherlock)
14: Syd Barrett (Legion)
15: Fitzwilliam Darcy (Pride and Prejudice)

I tag @manonblaxkbeak @buggitybooks @liograce and @rebornasqueen

anonymous asked:

I find you as a very important part of Obitine fandom (your art keeps this ship alive!!) and I'm thankful for that. Also i have a question: how do you imagine Obi-Wan after Satine's death? I think he could live with this, he is a Jedi after all. But i believe he had one huge break down when he cried so much he couldn't breathe (and maybe drunk some alcohol??? idk man) and Anakin did comfort him. These are my thoughts I wanna hear yours! And sorry for this ask being so long, hope you don't mind!

Aw, sweet anon, you make me blush, but everybody in the fandom is important! I’m glad you like the art, but your liking it is keeping the ship shipping along too, otherwise I‘d just be tossing sketches into the abyss of the internet.  <3<3<3  And there are lots of lovely artists in this corner of fandom, most of whom have been here longer than me.

Your (sad) question:

I’m not sure I think that Obi-Wan has much time to grieve for a while after Satine’s death? It’s unclear what the timeline is between The Lawless and Sabotage, but it seems close to me.

In general, I think after Satine’s death might be when Obi-Wan’s friendship with Padmé grows (they seem closer in RotS than they were during Clone Wars), since she was friends with Satine as well. I’m not sure he’d ever say much about it, just quietly enjoy Padmé’s company, knowing that she’s thinking of Satine and missing her too.

Anyway, I wrote you a little scene set during the Sabotage/The Wrong Jedi arc, but it’s pretty depressing.

Keep reading

orangeschmorange  asked:

Have you ever had any beers by Lagunitas? I don't know where they distribute, but I love their stuff. Also, just from a personal standpoint they are an awesome company. They are local and their tap room is not only a super cool space, but they also open it up to charity events and are so generous. Last night we had an event there that was free for us to host and 100% of their $5 drafts went to our organization. They provided staff. We literally set up food we had donated and brought a band.

that’s great you had such a good experience! sounds like an awesome event.

but lagunitas is one of the craft breweries EDIT you’re right, i got them switched in my mind HEINEKEN owns 50% of lagunitas [prob shouldn’t blog about beer on a way empty stomach]

i’ve never been, but that doesn’t surprise me that they built up a cool, local scene. & in beer mecca, nonetheless. (bless you california & your eleventy billion breweriessss)

& getting bought out by a bigger company doesn’t necessarily mean the beer quality tanks (no pun intended, i frickin swear.) one of the things AB-INBEV promised when they started buying smaller breweries (goose island, blue point, elysian,…) is that they wanted to keep the people doing the jobs in those jobs, not only so they don’t lose their jobs, but to keep quality consistent. 

but that is a lofty goal, because i’m not sure i’d feel the same way about working where i work now & it becoming super corporate all of a sudden– i would feel like the soul of the place might just drop out? so who knows how many of those people with that option even stayed.

but the bigger issue is: when a bigger brewery buys a littler one, they obviously have the ability to increase distribution. which is great…sometimes. but often what happens is the beer reps’ portfolio of what they can sell to merchants gets so difficult to manage, that after the initial ‘yay this beer is sold in this state now’ drops off, it’s another beer to juggle & fight for tap space in a very short shelf life (for most styles, anyway.) & it travels farther, under harder to monitor conditions, so…

a more local example for me is blue point. i remember blue point toasted lager as one of the first craft beers i liked. not the first, but certainly memorably crisp, lightly toasted malts, aromatic, not too sweet, not too bitter… a really nice light easy beer. then AB-INBEV bought them. i was initially psyched because it meant i could get one of those in the bar car on the metro north instead of whatever forgettable offerings they had at the time. 

& here’s where it gets murky, because i also have an evolving palate & can’t isolate the change, but at some point, it just…dropped off in flavor for me. how much of that is my flavor preferences, vs their scruples in brewing, vs their distribution methods, who is to say? & there are too many other options that taste fresher for me to keep trying.

& that brewery literally started as 2 dudes selling beer out of a station wagon. it sold for $24 million dollars. 

& to speak directly to your point, yes i know & love a bunch of lagunitas beers, but certainly i’ve noticed a drop-off in quality of their flagship ipa, so i rarely order it anymore.

just some things to think about when you think about beer.

& further EDIT: yes @djldgaf the chicago location opened in 2014 apparently, california in 1993, so yes they started getting big on their own, but the flavor issues i’ve noticed are more recent?

important psa: i’d like to issue an apology to anyone that i haven’t actually written with yet. i know i’m not the best roleplay partner, y’all.

  • notifications get screwy. 
  • i get distracted. 
  • lose muse. 
  • have muse for other blogs. 
  • sometimes, i’ll drop by your im’s to plot out ideas. 
  • other times, it’s simply not in me. 

since things take time, i also put responses, starters, or meme responses into my drafts. anyway, it’s come to my attention that i have pissed some people off.  i’m not trying to be ‘intimidating’ or ‘a bitch’. i love all of my mutuals (so long as you’re respectful and refrain from something as childish as slinging insults at me). i’m here to have fun, write, and share my love for benny hammond. again, i’m sorry.  i’ve never meant to anger or irritate anyone here.

neil agreeing to go on celebrity mean tweets once he goes pro and he’s reading some out and it’s shit like this:

“i have started a go-fund me to fly neil josten to antarctica and leave him there. still need five more dollars.”

”neil josten is one of the world’s most useless creations since the sloth”

“neil josten has such a big mouth on him i could replace my goalie racquet with him and no one would notice”

“@.neiljos10 what is red and blue all over and can’t score?”

and neil’s like haha so fu- oh shit are these all from andrew’s account??

AU where instead of going to Samwell, Jack starts a widely successful Publicly Broadcast show for children.

Jack learns that he is great with kids after coaching them for a little over two years. Moreover, kids are good with Jack. There is no pressure to be anything other than who he is.


It all starts with a local news program doing a fluff piece on Jack Zimmermann’s coaching ability. But then it turned into something completely different when Jack skated onto camera and started to introduce every single one of his kids and what was special about them. He was…really enchanting actually. He didn’t ever really talk down to them. Jack just treated them as a tiny friend. 

They ARE his tiny friends, but that’s not the point. 

The footage they got of “snack time” was really the best. Imagine a good 16 kids piled around this massive man teaching them the best way to make a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. 

 It should have been obvious that a local channel would contact him. It still surprises Jack. They want him to host a show? Why? Everyone always teased him about how impersonable he was during interviews. Is it because he’s Jack Zimmermann’s son? Or Alicia’s? 

Jack asks all of these questions to his mother and she just laughs. “You made a PB&J interesting to 16 kids just by being you”

Jack figures it wouldn’t hurt to give it a shot. 

Keep reading

Katara: It’s not magic. It’s waterbending, and it’s-
Sokka: Yeah, yeah, an ancient art unique to our culture, blah blah blah. Look, I’m just saying that if I had weird powers, I’d keep my weirdness to myself. 

So I wanted to talk a little about Katara, because I think we often focus on her grief for her mother, and forget her relationship to her culture, and her experience of the Southern Water Tribe genocide (unlike the Air Nomads genocide, which was for the greater part over after four big terrifyingly effective simultaneous strikes, this one took place over a long length of time - more than 40 years? 50? - and it wasn’t total, but it definitely was one. genocide = the deliberate and systematic extermination of a national, racial, political, or cultural group, fwiw)

(Kanna’s village - before and after)

All of the Southern water benders were exterminated or taken away to rot in prison (where they all died eventually except for Hama). Katara was born the only bender left in the whole South Pole. Then when she was eight years old, she survived a raid that was meant to kill her, but took her mother instead (she probably was too young to realize that, to her it must have been a question mark up until she met Yon Rha - gratuitous cruelty? Why her mother in particular? They took nothing else!).

So Katara from a young age had a double burden to bear: that of her mother, and the legacy of her bending (and she was shown as painfully aware of her situation and what it meant on both front). But here’s the thing: Katara could be a mother, she was naturally good at it, and her grandmother could teach her what she didn’t already knew. Her family and tribe demanded that of her, they needed her to be that for them (especially after her father and the rest of the men basically abandoned them). However, there was no one left to teach her how to waterbend - she had almost no hope of ever becoming a master without formal training, her brother thought it was silly and weird and let her know, her grandmother thought it was a waste of time. But she kept practicing, because she knew how important it was, to her and to her tribe, that she kept trying (as the only one left who could).

(…an ancient art unique to our culture, blah blah blah…)

(Of course she would obsess over that waterbending scroll)

When she gets to the North Pole, she meets Pakku, and with him the opportunity of finally becoming a true master. But because she is a girl, he judges her unworthy. He judges her, the only remaining southern waterbender, unworthy of carrying on their culture. The Fire Nation didn’t care about the gender of their prisoners, men and women - they all fought side by side for their freedom in the South, and they were all taken away to the last one, and killed to the last one. In the South, the women had the choice to learn how to fight, or be defenseless. And privileged master Pakku couldn’t possible realize the extend of what he was denying her in that moment.

Katara had to prove herself, she had to earn her right to these teachings. And if she had been less good or less stubborn or not Kanna’s granddaughter - well the North would have refused their sister-tribe the power to use their common cultural heritage to fight back against the nation that destroyed them.

(It’s sexist and terrible.)

Meh, thankfully, she was that good, stubborn, and Kanna’s granddaughter, and she did get to become a master.

Good.

But, of course, her story doesn’t end here, and wrt her culture, the next chapter is a much more traumatizing experience. In the Fire Nation, she meets another master. This time it’s an old woman from the South like her (“You’re a waterbender! I’ve never met another waterbender from our tribe!”), and she is, ah, more than willing to help her.

Look how happy Katara looks at the idea to learn from her in particular:

Katara: I can’t tell you what it means to meet you. It’s an honor! You’re a hero.
Hama: I never thought I’d meet another southern waterbender. I‘d like to teach you what I know so that you can carry on the southern tradition when I’m gone.
Katara: Yes! Yes, of course! To learn about my heritage… it would mean everything to me.

But when Hama starts her lesson, the techniques she teaches have been obviously developed with one goal in mind: survival in enemy territory. They can’t possibly have been invented in the South Pole, where water is abundant everywhere. They are deadly and cruel, and the damage they do to the environment leaves Katara sad and uncomfortable, but Hama waves that off as unimportant. It doesn’t matter, she doesn’t have the time to worry about flowers or beauty or nature. To her that peace and beauty is probably just an illusion anyway, a lie: years after her escape she is still living the war, and war is ugly and rotten and messy (her world is ugly and rotten and messy - this is her comfort zone).

The last technique she teaches Katara is bloodbending. She forces Katara to learn something she finds disgusting, repulsive (just like Hama was forced to learn?) by torturing her (Hama was tortured), by overpowering her, invading her, making her lose control over her own body, bending her blood (Hama herself is clinging to the last remain of control she managed to get back after rotting in prison for years), and finally by threatening to have the two people she cares most about in the world kill each other right under her eyes (Hama lost everyone too, she had to say goodbye).

(Katara: But, to reach inside someone and control them? I don’t know if I want that kind of power.
Hama: The choice is not yours. The power exists…and it’s your duty to use the gifts you’ve been given to win this war. Katara, they tried to wipe us out, our entire culture… your mother!
Katara: I know.
Hama: Then you should understand what I’m talking about. We’re the last Waterbenders of the Southern Tribe. We have to fight these people whenever we can. Wherever they are, with any means necessary!
Katara: It’s you. You’re the one who’s making people disappear during the full moons.
Hama: They threw me in prison to rot, along with my brothers and sisters. They deserve the same. You must carry on my work.)

And this, this, is the only truly southern waterbending Katara is ever going to learn. This is her tribe’s bending heritage, what’s left of it: blood, grief, suffering, hatred, loss of control over both your body and mind (because it’s terrible, but I think that’s what’s implied by the show: bloodbending makes you lose your mind. Hama’s only mean of regaining physical freedom ended up trapping her in another nightmare). Hama gifts her with a power she despises (but will use anyway in her darkest hour when she loses control) and a philosophy of violence and revenge.

Katara chose peace and forgiveness. As an adult, she will have bloodbending outlawed, she will become the greatest healer in the world, and she’ll teach her daughter, the next avatar, probably many others. These choices matter, and we should talk about them with that background in mind. Katara redefined her heritage - or rather she created a new one for herself: she refused the condition that was forced upon her (bloodbender) and ensured nobody could legally do to someone else what Hama did to her (and it’s implied this law is valid anywhere in the world). She transmitted Pakku’s warrior teachings, the ones she fought for, to the next generations (and did a great job of it!), but she also taught them how to heal, refusing to separate the arts as in Northern Water Tribe tradition - and healing was something she discovered by herself, that she felt was always a part of her. At that, she became the universally acknowledged best. Her legacy, despite everything that happened to her, will never be one of violence.

tl;dr: Katara is one of the strongest fictional characters ever created bye

4

@justlikecpparadise asked:

plz draw our fav boyz in yoga poses thank, also looking out for that hc you said you’d be making ;) lol

MERCEDES MY GIRL U GAVE ME SOME GOOD INSPO

bitty’s SUPER limber bc of the whole figure skating/hockey league thing, and sometimes jack thinks it’s going to be the death of him

so i’ve been thinking a lot about lance and his siblings

  • lance would drive his lil sister to and from school when their mama had to work. he’d wait outside the gates for her and they’d hold hands or he’d give her a piggy back to the car as he asked about her day
      •  sometimes she even made drawings for him to look at as they walked
  • the two (lance and his younger sis) go to the beach together A LOT
      • lance was actually the one who taught her to surf
      • they spend time building sandcastles, surfing and looking for shells they can take home
  • lance and his older sister are actually the ones who bicker the most, all of it playful teasing until lance gets too big for his boots and things get… interesting.
      • it normally ends with his sister getting him in a headlock and him tapping out though
  • lance is the only one his lil sister likes to comb her hair. she’s got real big curls and lance is the only one soft enough to be able to battle them. he’ll braid back her hair before they go swimming and it’s a job trying to get her to sit still
      • lance always has to guide her back down and he’s laughing as he’s all “woah, hey, you’re gonna mess up all my hard work!”
      • to which she giggles and settles for at least a minute
  • their whole family has movie nights where they just all pile in the living room and watch a couple movies. lance’s older siblings are all spread across the couch with his parents, while he and his younger sister are piled on the floor with pillows and blankets
      • it’s not too long before his older siblings get into an argument about the movie choice, to which lance and his lil sister just both respond “SHUT UPPPPPP” because they’re both so invested in the movie
      • lance gets a pillow thrown at the back of his head for that
  • lance is always trying to prove himself to his older siblings and that often leads to him getting himself into very sticky situations
      • he once got his head stuck in a metal fence because his brother dared him
      • one time he needed to go to the emergency room because he bet his siblings he could chug a bottle of hot sauce (he could not)
      • he tried backflipping off the trampoline once and ended up fracturing his ankles
      • he once got way too cocky while trying to get rid of a spider in the house and just straight up grabbed it in his hand. as you can imagine, his face was instant regret and he fainted
  • he and his older brother wrestle a lot too
      • they both commentate the fight as it’s happening
      • “and firstborn mcclain lands a fatal blow!! baby mcclain is down!! i don’t think he’s gonna get back up!!”
      • yes. lance is baby mcclain.
  • his siblings all tease lance for being a mamas boy, but it’s funny because they all love their mama so damn much. 
      • lance welcomes this title honestly
      • he stands there with a wide smile as he replies all “yeah. and what?”
      • mama is smiling in the background while his siblings smirk and mumble something along the lines of “kissass”
10

“You’re going to die tomorrow, Lord Bolton. Sleep well.”