also it's magical to write for those two i do enjoy it a lot

anonymous asked:

If you have the time and if you don't mind, what are some books you really recommend? Doesn't have to be all time faves, but anything that pops into mind that you want more ppl to read and love, Extra points if lgbt+ , i got the whole summer with little to do and i wanna spend it reading some good quality writing and honestly so far your recs have introduced me to so many faves its unbelievable

[blushes profusely] oh wow, thank you!!!  i’m so glad you’ve trusted me enough to check out some of the stuff i reblog; that is like the ultimate compliment, i can’t even???  i don’t mind at all(!), fair warning though: i only started recording what i read partway through last year and my mind is like a sieve so i’ll do my absolute best to remember what’s sang to me in the recent past.  warning number two: i’m in an open relationship with absolutely every genre out there so i’ll try to note which belongs where so you can avoid those that hold no interest for you.

LGBT+

  • i’ll give you the sun.  i loved this book, the writing is fucking transformative and all the characters are so damn likable, while still being realistically flawed human beings.
  • the raven cycle (tetralogy).  definitely my favorite series since harry potter.  the writing, the world-building, the characters, it’s all on top-form.  i wrote a little, mini non-spoilery review of it: here, back when i was better (worse?) wordly-wise and my feels were brand new.
  • more happy than not.  i’m still not sure how i feel about this book.  it was hard, but it felt very true to the characters and the lingo and style matched the ages of the players and i have a lot of respect for that.
  • the watchmaker of filigree street.  woooow i loved this book.  i admit ‘historical fiction’ kind of makes me cringe.  it never precludes me from reading a book but it does knock it down the list by a book or five because they’re often very dense and very clunky and end up taking me ages to get through.  but this one was gorgeous.  i loved the plot, the attention lovingly placed on every character and the historical elements.  the surprise gay in an already brilliant book felt like winning the lottery honestly.
  • captive prince (trilogy).  okay, truthfully, i’m only putting this on here because the second book is such a high point for me.  it was never bad at any point but it had unfortunately been hyped far too much for it to live up to my, admittedly, very high expectations.  hopefully it’ll fare better with you?
  • everything i never told you.  i go back and forth on this one.  i like the writing a lot, i like the LGBT aspect a lot, and i like the mystery aspect a lot but there are definitely characters i would cut out entirely for sheer predictability if i could and that killed a lot of my enjoyment at the time (but i think much more highly of it in retrospect?).  so, take that as you like.
  • aristotle and dante discover the secrets of the universe.  if there’s a book that handles its characters with more care or respect or consideration then i haven’t run into it.  i love the way this is written and the people it’s populated with.
  • flying lessons & other stories.  a bunch of uber talented authors writing a bunch of uber diverse and LGBT-focused stories and, yes, that is exactly as awesome as it sounds.
  • the song of achilles.  it is utterly heart-breaking but so rich, honestly.

FANTASY

  • the diviners.  (also has a minor LGBT character, who may play a bigger role in the sequel?)  fair warning, i have not read the sequel, lair of dreams, because it is somehow still not out in paperback (yes, i read physical books, yes, i pretty exclusively read paperbacks so i can lug them everywhere with me, YES, I PRE-ORDERED THIS ALMOST TWO YEARS AGO AND IT’S STILL NOT OUT, NOT THAT I’M BITTER ABOUT THAT OR ANYTHING) so i can’t speak to that one finishing on a high note as i don’t know.  but this was the first historical novel i managed to like in a long while.  it does such a good job of fusing in 1920s lingo and dress and aspects that i couldn’t help but love it.  add in the fantasy elements and i can admit i’m the perfect sucker for it.
  • the scorpio races.  i’m not sure why but it took me a long-ass time to get into this book, i wasn’t flipping pages with gusto until well towards the end but - especially as i was reading so much YA at the time - i really appreciated coming across a romance that lets both people come into it as themselves and stay themselves, neither puck nor sean were ever smashed or crumpled or shaved away to fit into their relationship, which was so refreshing.  plus the water horses were fucking cool.
  • the night circus.  the writing, the atmosphere, the circus.  just… it is all very whoa.
  • all the birds in the sky.  i loved this writing style and these characters and the magical elements.

CONTEMPORARY

  • i’ll meet you there.  there was something about this and i just… ended up liking it way more than i expected to.  i might’ve just read it at exactly the right time, i’m not sure, but i really enjoyed it.
  • the invoice.  this is honestly just hella cute and so freaking surreal.  swedes, man.

NON-FICTION

  • why not me?  i like mindy kaling a lot.  i make no apologies for that.  plus you can read both her books in about five seconds, haha.

SCIENCE FICTION

  • station eleven.  i loved this book.  the way the narrative is woven is so refreshing and i wish the comic book miranda was writing in this book was a real thing more than anything else in the woooorld.
  • illuminae.  hot DAMN this book was cool.  the plot was rock solid, the characters were hilarious and badass and the graphics made out of text and spiraling words and just the way this thing is put together?  shit, it’s worth your money and then some.
  • a robot in the garden.  okay this is just cute as hell.  i can’t even with tang, he’s the most adorable robot to ever adorable.
  • annihilation (southern reach trilogy).  (LGBT minor characters.)  okay, honestly?  i don’t know.  this was freaking zany but i was invested as fuck in all the kookiness for reasons i can’t articulately elaborate on.
  • the martian.  hilarious, engaging, SPACE.  what more do you want?

HORROR

  • things we lost in the fire.  this is more atmospheric than anything but, damn, could this get me wishing i wasn’t reading this in the dark or looking over my shoulder to make absolutely sure no one was standing behind me.  it’s a book of short stories (by the way, i love books of short stories and i definitely realize that is not true for everyone) and each one is so well-delivered and stylized.  i really enjoyed reading this.
  • let the right one in.  okay, this is legit horror so definitely stay away if you’re easily squicked out but it is harrrrrd to find good horror (at least in my opinion) and this definitely, definitely qualifies.
  • horrorstör.  i honestly had such low expectations for this, a horror story set in a wannabe-ikea, but it ended up being so ridiculous and strange and funny that i was won over by the finish.
  • the girl with all the gifts.  holy unique and well-executed zombie idea, batman!

SHORT STORIES

  • the bigness of the world.  there were definitely ones here that hit better than others but the ones i liked, i really liked!

GRAPHIC NOVELS (i read a lot of these so, um, prepare yourself)

  • saga.  (LGBT minor characters as well.)  this is world-building to a degree that i’m convinced did not exist before.  just, i can’t say enough amazing things about this series and the staggering amount of imagination that regularly goes into it.
  • ms. marvel.  heart-warming as fuck.  it’s definitely really easy to lose faith in the world these days, luckily kamala is there to remind you that people are primarily and genuinely good.
  • black science.  this is another one that took just an insane amount of imagination to cook up.  i got off to kind of a rocky start with this one but the gray-ness of all the characters really speaks to me, and that doesn’t really blossom until later in the series.
  • spider-man/deadpool.  this was very satisfying for my super duper spideypool-shipping mind.  joe and ed did us so good, and joe basically said in his sign-off: i made it absolutely as gay as they would let me, haha.
  • the wicked + the divine.  (LGBT minor characters that you’re going to get way too attached to, and retroactively.  it’s awful [sobs].)  the concept for this, gods reincarnating into teenagers before they burn up their hosts after a predetermined set of time, is so fucking cool.  the humor and the characters and the plot is all just aces.
  • iceman (LGBT MAIN CHARACTER).  okay, so this just started.  like issue #2 was only released days ago but 1) i am liking it so far and 2) marvel did it so dirty and barely advertised bobby - an openly homosexual superhero - was getting his own series, like, i found out about it the day before it went on sale and i keep my ear fairly close to the ground (not as close as some BY A LOT, but closer than the lay person i’d say) so if you can support it, please do!  pre-orders mean a lot in terms of numbers. :))))
  • descender.  admittedly, this starts out rooough.  because the main character, TIM-21 (and his little dog too), are annoying as hell.  he’s an android so there’s no dimension to him so he’s booooring as all get out but i am so glad i stuck with it through to the next trade because, probably picking up on the unsustainability of him as a main character, he gets shuffled off and the side characters get the stage and they rock so hard.
  • paper girls. (LGBT main characters.)  i’m kind of just convinced that brian k. vaughan can do no wrong at this point.  his plots are so tight and mind-blowing and badass.
  • monstress.  here’s a little tid-bit about me: female comic book writers are 100% more likely to get my money and my time because they are so damn rare and this series is unique, badass, and eye-opening.
  • black monday murders.  i’m a little premature with this since there’s only one volume and i usually try to wait until there are at least two but i check up on a volume two a lot so that definitely means something intrigued me!
  • nailbiter.  okay, i haven’t read the final volume yet ‘cause i’m reluctant to let it go but, so far, a series about multiple serial killers all being from the same town has me VERY HOOKED.

i wish i could remember more but this is honestly way better than i expected to do, haha.  they’re definitely not all my all-time faves but they’re ones that have stuck with me for one reason or another and that i didn’t feel i wasted my time on, so that’s something, right?  i hope this helps get you started and that you don’t think too awfully of me when you inevitably run across ones that aren’t your cup of tea!

[Revised 2/17] Books for Witches, Diviners and Spellcasters

Hi, everyone. A while back (a long time ago, actually), I started an annotated bibliography on books about witchcraft and magick, and I’ve updated it once (last November). 

Since then, I’d been keeping a list of things I need to add to it, but didn’t get around to actually reworking and updating the list a second time until today. Largely because I can’t really go outside much today because of the smog. But anyways, here it is. I’ve also included divination-related books in this version, whereas previously they were separate.

I hope you find something on here that suits your fancy! Happy reading! Also, yes, I do want to do more book reviews on this blog, so if you’d like a longer review of one of the books listed below, let me know and I can write one.

For Absolute Beginners

Encyclopedia of Witchcraft, by Judika Illes. Even better than the Weiser Field Guide to Witches - this book is huge and chock-full of information. It’ll explain in easy-to-understand language how the concept has developed throughout time, why witches do what they do, and different types of witches.

The Weiser Field Guide to Witches, by Judika Illes. This gives an excellent look at the historical lore concerning witches, from the perspective of a witch herself. It’s kind of tongue-in-cheek, but it does have some information that won’t be found elsewhere.

The Modern Guide to Witchcraft, by Skye Alexander. Great book for those who’re really absolute beginners and are wondering what witchcraft is all about. Skye takes a very postmodern, utilitarian, and unfailingly honest approach, and it’s geared towards those of almost any belief system.

Grimoire for the Apprentice Wizard, by Oberon Zell-Ravenheart. Attractively packaged and readible for almost all ages, this is a great (mostly) non-denominational look at the foundations of magical practice. It’s extremely detailed. Some of it only applies to Zell’s own tradition, but it’s quite useful, anyways.

Basic Techniques

Protection and Reversal Magick, by Jason Miller. This gets a little woo-woo at times, but he gives good advice on how to avoid serious problems that can come up as you begin to practice. Take with a grain of salt, though - some of this has the potential to make you feel paranoid.

City Magick, by Christopher Penczak. If you’re at all interested in tech witchery, or just want to practice magick within an urban setting, do check this out. It is by far the best look at the subject I’ve seen, and his discussion of urban tutelary spirits is worth the price alone.

Power Spellcraft for Life, by Arin Murphy-Hiscock. Nicely done, quite secular book providing basic beginner information regarding writing original spells and workings. It does fall prey to the trap of just listing correspondences with little information at times, but also contains a great deal of detail about ritual timing, raising power, and other topics essential for the beginner.

Sorcerer’s Secrets, by Jason Miller. This is a decent volume that describes a lot of techniques you don’t usually see in books, such as gesture and gaze-based magick. Be warned that Miller writes extensively about manipulative techniques, but it’s useful theory regardless of how you put it into practice.

Witch’s Bag of Tricks, by Melanie Marquis. This is not recommended for beginners, because the whole point of this book is to help existing practitioners refine and improve their already-established techniques. It’s got some novel ideas in it, and I like the author’s approach to symbolism in spellcasting.

Direct Magick (Energy Work)

The Un-Spell Book, by Mya Om. This non-denominational guide to working with magical forces is filled with useful exercises that go beyond the author’s previous work. I recommend reading this after reading Energy Essentials.

Instant Magick, by Christopher Penczak. Excellent beginner’s guide for those who don’t have access to a lot of fancy tools or prefer to work without them. This book won’t instantly teach you magick, but it will help even a seasoned practitioner find quicker, less-complicated ways of achieving results.

Energy Essentials for Witches and Spellcasters, by Mya Om. Though I balk at the use of the term “energy” to describe magical forces, this book is worth a look. It’s a bit like a workbook, with various exercises. Expect a lot of pseudoscience, though, and there are many religious references, but the techniques are solid.

Hedgewitchery and Astral Travel

Ecstatic Witchcraft, by Gede Parma. This is actually probably my favorite book on this subject, even though hedgeriding is only a part of what the book discusses. The only bad thing I can really say about this book is that it’s really not recommended for beginners, and it’s helpful to have the basics of visualization already mastered (for example) before doing the exercises Parma recommends.

By Land, Sky and Sea, by Gede Parma. This book goes into even greater details regarding different ways of conceptualizing the cosmology of hedgeriding, and I find it a very refreshing book that appreciatively draws from a number of different perspectives while grounding itself, so to speak, with the overarching metaphor of land, sky, and sea as the three worlds.

The Temple of Shamanic Witchcraft, by Christopher Penczak. Penczak is usually a pretty mixed bag, and this book is no exception. It gives a lot of good practical information and a very in-depth exploration of the three worlds (a useful concept), but it’s primarily framed by Wicca, so it might not resonate with those of other faiths and particularly those who aren’t pagan at all.

Ascension Magick, by Christopher Penczak. There’s a chapter or two in this that address alternate ways of conceptualizing the architecture of reality, and it’s pretty helpful for a hedgerider. Beyond that, this book is mostly about ceremonial magick, but it’s a (mostly) good book. Certain parts (such as the bit about UFOs) are a little off, in my opinion.

The Shamanic Witch, by Gail Wood. This book is really best suited for someone who practices Wicca and, besides the background info and cosmological descriptions, is really only useful in the context of that tradition. If you’re Wiccan or willing to pick around a lot of Wiccan-talk, though, this is a good foundation.

Witches, Werewolves and Fairies, by Claude Lecouteux. It can be hard to find scholarly works on these phenomena that are affordable, but here’s one I personally enjoyed. It details many accounts of journeying experienced by both pagans and Christians in earlier times, and gives a good description of the concept of the astral double, the architecture of the soul, and other topics throughout history.

Betwixt and Between, by Storm Faerywolf. This book is mostly a guide to the Feri tradition of witchcraft, but while I myself don’t practice that, those who do seem to know a lot about hedgeriding! The book has several chapters on the subject and is highly recommended for this reason.

The Psychic Energy Codex, by Michelle Belanger. A lot of people have strong opinions about this author, but this is book actually provides a lot of good information about so-called “energy work” which can be a step in the right direction for those wanting to ride the hedge.

Psychic Dreamwalking, by Michelle Belanger. In this book, Belanger discusses, essentially, how to use your non-waking life as a vehicle to for journeying, and while I myself don’t usually dreamwalk, much of what she says applies to hedgeriding in other states, too.

Hedge Riding and Hedge Witchcraft, by Harmonia Saille. I only mention these two in order to say that they’re best avoided. Saille tries to give a comprehensive look at the phenomenon, but it’s poorly-written and overly New Age. The negative reviews of them on Amazon really cover the problems with these book in more detail than I ever could.

Magical Writing, Words, and Symbols

Dictionary of Ancient Magic Words and Spells, by Claude Lecouteux. Mostly a historical text, this book isn’t exactly practical or terribly useful. It is, nevertheless, incredibly interesting. It’s a bit difficult to navigate, but worth a glance.

Composing Magick, by Elizabeth Barrette. A very general, but well-done, look at writing in a magical context. Some of the ritual templates are slightly specific to religious witchcraft traditions, but most information is widely applicable.

Crafting Magick with Pen and Ink, by Susan Pesnecker. Focuses both on the physical act of writing as a magical act, and the mental state associated with it. Highly recommended

The Modern Witchcraft Grimoire, by Skye Alexander. This book is for those who want to create their own grimoire. It gives fairly good advice for doing so, as well as providing hints and tricks for spellcasting and useful correspondences.

General Concepts

Planetary Magick, by Melita Denning and Osborne Phillips. If you want to work with the planets at all, particularly in a highly ritualized context, I recommend this book. It’s large, comprehensive and gives a good foundation beyond what you find in general astrology books.

Practical Planetary Magick, by Sorita d’Este and David Rankine. Shorter than I would have liked, but a useful reference to have on your shelf, with excellent tables and appendices in the back. The meditations are also quite useful.

Practical Elemental Magick, by Sorita d’Este and David Rankine. Should be read alongside the other book by this pair. Comprehensive guide to working with the elements in a ritualized fashion. Not as accessible to newbies as Lipp’s book, but good for seasoned practitioners.

The Way of Four, by Deborah Lipp. Though mostly geared towards Wiccans, I found this author’s in-depth treatment of the four elements highly fascinating. I will note that it’s probably best to get the print version of this book, as it contains exercises and quizzes.

Ingredients and Correspondences

The Herbal Alchemist’s Handbook, by Karen Harrison. I cannot praise this book enough for its concise and well-formulated approach to astrology, herbs, and magick as a whole.

The Weiser Concise Guide to Herbal Magick, by Judith Hawkins-Tillirson. This is excellent for anyone who’s interested in any kind of magick. Yes, the focus is generally herbs, but there’s a lot to be learned here about Kabbalah and other correspondence systems, as well.

Mixing Essential Oils for Magic, by Sandra Kynes. Fills a very difficult gap in published knowledge regarding the use of essential oils by discussing, in great detail, how scents interact with each other and how to create a formula that’s not only palatable, but evocative.

Dunwich’s Guide to Gemstone Sorcery, by Gerina Dunwich. Given the New Age fascination with all things shiny, it was quite a chore to sort through the myriad crystal books to find something with good information. While far from perfect and not exactly devoid of fluff, this book does give a level of detail about the lore surrounding gemstones not seen in many other texts.

Real Alchemy, by Robert Allen Bartlett. Excellent book, lots of history and detail. There’s a strong focus on tradition within the text, yet the author is quite accommodating of his audience and describes alternate methods that work better in a modern context.

Spagyrics, by Manfred M. Junius. With a highly-developed academic tone and attention to detail, this book is a meaty look at traditional alchemy. I recommend this more for intermediate practitioners due to the sheer density of information.

Spellbooks

The Goodly Spellbook, by Dixie Deerman and Steve Rasmussen. The title sounds horribly fluffy, but this is a hidden gem. It explains obscure concepts like alternative alphabets and potential uses of musical notes, as well as plant lore and other bits and pieces. Definitely worth checking out. It’s way more than just “a book of spells.”

Encyclopedia of 5,000 Spells, by Judika Illes. The title sounds trite to some, but it delivers. This book has spells from almost every culture and spiritual philosophy, as well as a very detailed formulary. I read it when I’m bored sometimes, too, just because I always learn some tidbit from it.

Book of Spells, by Nicola Pulford. In most editions, this book is absolutely gorgeous and describes spellcasting traditions from a variety of perspectives and traditions. Recommended for those who already understand the basics, as this book jumps straight into spellcasting and gives only a small amount of information about how things work.

Ceremonial Magick

Modern Magick, by Donald Michael Kraig. I received this as a gift several years ago. It is essentially a workbook meant to be completed slowly, step by step, and while the format will not appeal to everyone, it’s a good easy-to-read introduction to ceremonial magick.

Familiar Spirits, by Donald Tyson. Though geared towards ceremonialists, any practitioner can likely learn a thing or two from Tyson’s interesting stroll through the whys and wherefores of spirit work and thoughtform creation. This is by far the best book I’ve seen on the topic of familiar spirits.

Secrets of High Magick, by Francis Melville. The most recent edition of this (the one I own) is lavishly-illustrated and full of rudimentary, yet useful information. He stresses the basics of ceremonial practice, and his writing style is very accessible. Highly recommended for absolute beginners.

My Life With The Spirits, by Lon Milo DuQuette. This is a memoir of a ceremonial magician, but it gives a good look at the magickal mindset in a highly developed form from someone who’s experienced quite a lot. I have major issues with DuQuette’s approach to Qabalah, but his memoirs are worth a read.

Chaos Magick

Liber Null and Psychonaut, by Peter Carroll. Classic book of chaos magick. I consider it required reading for almost anyone interested in the occult. Even if you have no love for chaos magick, do give it a read, just to understand how influential Carroll is, and why.

Hands-On Chaos Magic, by Andrieh Vitimus. Knowing some of the people involved in the creation of this book, I’m a bit biased towards it. That said, even if I didn’t know them, I would still recommend it. It’s especially interesting to read alongside Liber Null and Psychonautin order to see how the chaos “current” has developed over the years.

Pop Culture Magic 2.0 by Taylor Ellwood. There aren’t a lot of books on using pop culture symbolism in magick, but this one is nearly perfect. The author writes in a highly erudite, literate fashion, while still being accessible to newbies. Many useful resources cited, as well, so prepare to branch off a bit while reading it.

History-Related

Triumph of the Moon, by Ronald Hutton. An inside no-holds-barred look at the history of Wicca and Modern paganism. Highly recommended. This is sort of the book that fluffbunnies don’t want you to read.

Book of Lies: The Disinformation Guide to Magick and the Occult, by Richard Metzger. Lots of facts and history of magick in the context of Postmodernity. This is different from the Crowley text of the same name, which I wouldn’t recommend unless you want to focus on his tradition.

The Place of Enchantment, by Alex Owen. This is a purely historical text that documents the occult revival within the context of Modernity. I remember it being very good, but please realize I haven’t really picked it up much since graduating, and it might just have served my mindset at the time.

Tarot

The Book of Thoth, by Aleister Crowley. Make sure you actually own (or have access to pictures of) the Thoth deck before you dive into this. By far one of the best books on Tarot ever published. The prose is often dense and purple, but in this one book, Crowley teaches so much about Tarot and it’s connection to the Western Mystery Tradition. I can’t really say much more - it must be experienced.

The Pictorial Key to the Tarot, by Arthur Edward Waite. I recommend this book because it is a classic and was introductory for many older readers. It will teach you to read and gives insight into the methodology behind the Waite-Smith deck specifically, particularly his use of what are essentially parables and why he does this. Do not expect too much esoteric information, but read it anyways.

Seventy-Eight Degrees of Wisdom, by Rachel Pollack. This is the epitome of a good modern Tarot book and is really one of the first ones I’d recommend for someone looking for an accessible book on Tarot in a modern context. Very dense in information and history, yet altogether worth it. You’ll want highlighters nearby for this one!

Tarot for a New Generation, by Janina Renée. This is essentially a book for children and teenagers, but I do recommend it for them, specifically, because it is well-written, easy to understand, and helpful to absolute beginners.

Secrets of the Waite-Smith Tarot, by Marcus Katz and Tali Goodwin. This book focuses just on the history, symbolism, and creative process of the Waite-Smith deck. It gives you an inside line on just what Pixie Smith was thinking when painting specific scenes, and is a great look at her life’s work, as well.

The Tarot: History, Symbolism, and Divination, by Robert M. Place. This book will not teach you to read Tarot, but does give an actual, accurate portrait of the history of the phenomena, which is incredibly important and useful. Know your history.

Understanding Aleister Crowley’s Thoth Tarot, by Lon Milo DuQuette. I hesitate to recommend DuQuette due to issues I have with his approach to Qabalah, but many people ask me for a beginner book for the Thoth Tarot specifically, and this is the closest I’ve come to finding one. I recommend reading this alongside, and not instead of, Crowley’s Book of Thoth.

The Back in Time Tarot, by Janet Boyer. This is more for the intermediate reader, and the entire book details a single, extremely useful technique for familiarizing yourself with the cards, namely by framing past events in terms of how they might appear in a spread.

Lenormand

The Essential Lenormand, by Rana George. This was not the first Lenormand book I picked up, but it was the most influential and intense. Ms. George writes in a personable, touching fashion and brings the concepts of the system home by relating them to life experiences in a way rarely seen. She is one of those authors I literally go all “fangirl” over.

Learning Lenormand, by Marcus Katz and Tali Goodwin. This is one of the better beginner books on Lenormand. I’m not going to lie - it isn’t as good as Rana George’s, but it definitely is worth reading if you’re completely new to the system. It’s very accessible, where some of the books I’ll be listing later in this can seem intimidating, or so I’ve been told.

Lenormand: Thirty-Six Cards, by Andy Boroveshengra. This book is intense, but in a different way than Ms. George’s. Expect to be inundated with information and techniques. Another one of those where you really need to take notes or highlight while reading, and read it multiple times.

Secrets of the Lenormand Oracle, by Sylvie Steinbach. This book is organized in a novel and useful fashion by topic, and gives specific techniques for readings on love, money, spirituality, and other topics. Highly recommended, and I tend to use it as a reference book nowadays, looking things up as needed.

The Complete Lenormand Oracle Handbook, by Caitlyn Matthews. Not for the beginner, nor the faint at heart, this one details a lot of what, to me, seem to be more advanced approaches and techniques. I use this book a lot, and I think anyone else will enjoy it, too. Good information on the connection between Lenormand and traditional playing cards, too.

Cartomancy with Lenormand and the Tarot, by Patrick Dunn. This is more of a special topic book, and best read after you’ve got some familiarity with both Tarot and Lenormand. It’s all about using them in tandem and the synergy between them.

Astrology

The Luminaries, by Liz Greene. I could really recommend anything by this author, but she’s written so much, and this book is a particularly important one. It focuses entirely on the Sun and Moon in astrology, and gives a good look at why the luminaries need to have a special place in your understanding.

The Weiser Concise Guide to Practical Astrology, by Priscilla Costello. This is focused, as you might expect, on actual interpretation of charts and less on theory, but it gives a good background on that, too. Was quite helpful in my attempts to interpret @xepsurah‘s unusual natal chart.

The Complete Book of Astrology, by Kris Brandt Riske. Very beginner, and very light on intellect, heavy on intuition. A great introduction, but I would not suggest it as the only book you read if you’re really interested in the subject.

Tasseography

Tea Leaf Reading for Beginners, by Caroline Dow. There are only a few books within Llewellyn’s immensely popular “For Beginners” series that I would recommend, and this is one of them. The symbol glossary (which makes up the bulk of the book) is the most useful part.

Tea Cup Reading, by Sasha Fenton. This book goes into some detail (quite a bit, actually) about the history of tea and coffee, and, better yet, how to prepare them in the traditional fashion! A lot of traditional lore is described, as well.

Scrying, etc.

Scrying for Beginners, by Donald Tyson. This is really a surprise find, as I don’t usually expect much from this series, by Tyson knows his history and goes far beyond simple exercises for scrying. He is a bit biased towards mirror and crystal-gazing techniques, but does discuss other methods.

Psychic Development for Beginners, by William Hewitt. Readable, and offers some very practical developmental exercises for those wishing to hone extrasensory abilities. Be prepared to sort through a lot of woo, though.

A-Z Book Recommendations.

What a great idea from my friend at @macrolit :) Had to give it a go. I’ve omitted “A’s” and “The’s” from most of the titles for sake of flow.

  • A - American Gods by Neil Gaiman - A wandering modern “fantasy” that felt keenly poignant to me having grown up in the midwest. You’ll need patience for this one but this book is truly about the journey not the destination.
  • B - Bloody Jack by L.A. Meyer - I’ll be honest, I never finished this series. It got a little overblown but the characters are so genuine that I held out a lot longer than I would expect of myself. This first book though is the definition of a classic middle reader. Lot of Adventure and a lovable, fierce, albeit flawed, female protagonist. 
  • C - Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess - I used to read this book every summer. It’s a rough read with some explicit violence (sexual and otherwise) but an important one I think. I recommend reading the “British” publishing which has 21 chapters (the publishers took out the last one for American audiences, because apparently we don’t like character redemption and growth *eyeroll*). The real genius of this book is the vernacular Burgess created from scratch that is truly like reading another language at first. 
  • D - Darker Shade of Magic by V.E. Schwab - Not to be cliche but I find that a lot of the titles Booklr obsesses over in the YA genre to be par-baked at best. Not the case with this series! Well developed characters that exist beyond their actions and exhibit real emotional complexity without relying on tropes and a plot that kept me turning and turning pages!

Keep reading

Truth comes first ~P.1

Originally posted by fyeahriverdale

► Summary: 

Despite the fact that the reader is just a teenager, she has bigger problems, some of them unable to handle. 

Also when the Jason Blossom’s case starts to become an attractive mystery to her, she looks for someone else to help her which leads her to Jughead Jones. 

► Pair: Jughead Jones x Reader

►  Word Count: 1,668

► Warnings: none

► A/N: Hello and welcome to the first part of the new Jughead Jones’ series. I hope you like and enjoy it, if that’s the case, let me know! I will appreciate it a lot and also I would know if I should start working on the next part! Tags are opened! 


Riverdale high school. First class in the morning.

The students start to fill the classrooms. Some of them are sleepy, as if they still were on their beds. Some others were ready to keep learning another day more and the rest just hated to be there.

You couldn’t be put in none of the groups mentioned before. You were just there. Ready for the classes? Of course. Eager for them? Not that much, at least usually. First class on Mondays were always an exception. Your favorite subject; psychology.

You were sitting in the placed you always used to occupy since the very first day without a partner by your side. Not that you didn’t have friends at all, you just knew how to enjoy loneliness most of the times.

Keep reading

Queer YA Books: Read

so here’s a list of books I’ve read for my project to read as many gay YA books as I can, as requested by @arabian-batboy and an anon friend, these will be listed in order by author’s last name, if I don’t link the book it’s because I didn’t think it’s worth reading, I’ll make comments on the one’s I think are best :) hope this is useful :) 

1. Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli (very good, re-read a few times now)

2. Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Sáenz

3. No Strings by Sara Alva 

4. Social Skills by Sara Alva 

5. Silent by Sara Alva (good book, there’s stuff about abuse and such, if you like sad but beautiful and happy at the end book, a go to)

6. The Island of Beyond by Elizabeth Atkinson (all the gay stuff is subtext, but cute coming of age) 

7. One Man Guy by Michael Barakiva (cute re-read a few times now)

8. Wonders of the Invisible World by Christopher Barzak (yes read it, now)

9. I am J by Cris Beam

10. Something Like Summer by Jay Bell 

11. Kamikaze Boys by Jay Bell 

12. Vintage: A Ghost Story by Steve Berman

13. The Darkest Part of the Forest by Holly Black (if you liked “I’ll Give You the Sun” this is a must read, I view those books as spirt twins, go read this now)

14. That One Kid Who Freaked Out, Or Whatever by A.J.J. Bourque

15. For a Price by Hallie Burton

16. Gives Light by Rose Christo (first in a series, kinda goes off the rails latter on with drama overload, but this first one was very good)

17. Naomi and Ely’s No Kiss List by Rachel Cohn/David Levithan

18. Nick & Norah’s Infinite Playlist by Rachel Cohn/David Levithan (not gay as such, but queer characters make up the background of the book, worth reading if you’ve never really enjoyed a straight romance)

19. Invisibility by Andrea Cremer/David Levithan (again not gay, but a main supporting character is and his queerness is a big part of the story)

20. Beautiful Music for Ugly Children by Kirstin Cronn-Mills

21. Carry the Ocean by Heidi Cullinan (mental health is the theme and it’s the only book with an autistic main character I haven’t felt offended by so there’s that)

22. Aaron’s Story by Mason Dodd

23. Braden’s Story by Mason Dodd

24. Superhero by Eli Easton

25. Rosie and the Quarry Ghost by Rachel Eliason

26. Caged in Myth by J.T. Fairfield

27. The Great American Whatever by Tim Federle

28. The Screwed Up Life of Charlie the Second by Drew Ferguson

29. Being True by Jacob Z. Flores

30. Eagle Peak by Elizabeth Fontaine

31. Sweaters & Cigarettes by Mika Fox

32. All The Colors Of Love by Jessica Freely

33. The Battle for Jericho by Gene Gant

34. Lucky Linus by Gene Gant

35. Symptoms of Being Human by Jeff Garvin

36. The Boy’s Own Manual to Being a Proper Jew by Eli Glasman

37. Two Parties, One Tux, and a Very Short Film about The Grapes of Wrath by  Steven Goldman

38. The Mariposa Club by Rigoberto González

39. Tales from Foster High by John Goode (something of a classic)

40. Will Grayson, Will Grayson by John Green/David Levithan

41. Half Bad by Sally Green (will make you sad)

42. Half Wild by Sally Green (will make you cry)

43. Half Lost by Sally Green (will break your heart and step on the pieces and you’ll never be ok again)

44. None of the Above by I.W. Gregorio

45. The Last Exit to Normal by Michael Harmon 

46. Geography Club by Brent Hartinger

47. Totally Joe by James Howe (OMG one of my all time favorite books ever, if you love adorable, fluff, heartfelt, or were ever a little gay boy in middle school this is a must must read, must) 

48. After School Activities by Dirk Hunter

49. The Five Stages of Andrew Brawley by Shaun David Hutchinson

50. We Are the Ants by Shaun David Hutchinson

51. Problems I’m Having by Sam Isaacs

52. The Boy Who Couldn’t Fly Straight by Jeff Jacobson (loved this but there likely won’t be a sequel so if you can live never knowing go for it)

53. Haffling by Caleb James (loved it, magic, gays, growing up poor)

54. T.E.D. by Jayson James

55. Know Not Why by Hannah Johnson

56. On the Right Track by Sam Kadence

57. Intervention by Mia Kerick

58. The Red Sheet by Mia Kerick (I loved this one a lot) 

59. Us Three by Mia Kerick

60. Inclination by Mia Kerick

61. Not Broken, Just Bent by Mia Kerick

62. The Lightning-Struck Heart by T.J. Klune (why aren’t you reading this? you need to be reading this book, like now! it’s basically grown in a lab to be the book for Tumblr!) 

63. Openly Straight by Bill Konigsberg (I need to go re-read this)

64. Out of the Pocket by Bill Konigsberg

65. Absolutely Positively Not by David LaRochelle

66. Every Day by David Leviathan

67. Boy Meets Boy by David Leviathan (Classic maybe the first LGBT YA book to really make it or be published, it amazes me that it’s already 12 years old but it’s still special and true after all these years) 

68. How to Repair a Mechanical Heart by J.C. Lillis (a book about gay nerds and shipping, you know you want to read it)

69. Signs by Anna Martin

70. A Broken Kind of Life by Jamie Mayfield (I liked it but it’s very intense with rather upsetting themes) 

71. When Ryan Came Back by Devon McCormack (ghost boyfriends!) 

72. Vivaldi in the Dark by Matthew J. Metzger 

73. The Before Now and After Then by Peter Monn

74. Hero by Perry Moore (Moore’s death shortly after writing this book is one of the greatest losses that gay lit or superhero fiction could suffer)

75. Teeth by Hannah Moskowitz

76. Marco Impossible by Hannah Moskowitz

77. hidden by Tomas Mournian

78. Heavyweight by M.B. Mulhall

79. Birds on a Wire by Ellen Mulholland

80. I’ll Give You the Sun by Jandy Nelson (every time I bring up that I like gay/queer YA books this one comes up, so I assume it doesn’t need me cheerleading it)

81. The Rest of Us Just Live Here by Patrick Ness (really cute and funny spoof of your standard YA hero story, but also has a lot of heart and soul)

82. More Than This by Patrick Ness

83. Fearless by Chris O'Guinn

84. Unintended by M.J. O'Shea

85. I’ll Always Miss You by Raine O'Tierney

86. M or F? by Lisa Papademetriou/Chris Tebbetts

87. Play Me, I’m Yours by Madison Parker (loved it, re-read it a lot)

88. Here’s to You, Zeb Pike by Johanna Parkhurst

89. Outtakes of A Walking Mistake by Anthony Paull 

90. Sprout by Dale Peck

91. Band Fags! by Frank Anthony Polito

92. Drama Queers! by Frank Anthony Polito

93. When Everything Feels Like the Movies by Raziel Reid (cries and cries, sad ending)

94. The Hidden Oracle by Rick Riordan (why yes its a Percy Jackson book with a bi/pansexual main character and a gay teenage boy couple as major characters, why haven’t you read it yet?) 

95. Carry On by Rainbow Rowell (awesome book, amazing, must read, go read it now!) 

96. My Awesome/Awful Popularity Plan by Seth Rudetsky

97. Bait by Alex Sanchez

98. The God Box by Alex Sanchez

99. Rainbow Boys by Alex Sanchez (another early classic got me through high school) 

100. So Hard to Say by Alex Sanchez (my favorite thing Sanchez has ever done, adorable) 

101. Getting It by Alex Sanchez

102. Fans of the Impossible Life by Kate Scelsa 

103. Drag Teen by Jeffery Self 

104. Playing by the Book by S. Chris Shirley

105. More Happy Than Not by Adam Silvera (heart breaker) 

106. Grasshopper Jungle by Andrew Smith

107. Freak Show by James St. James (oh my god, James you beautify man you thanks for all you do) 

108. Wrestling with Desire by D.H. Starr

109. Ray of Sunlight by Brynn Stein (I’m not crying you’re crying!)

110. Imaginary by Jamie Sullivan 

111. Rock by Anyta Sunday

112. (In)visible by Anyta Sunday

113. 366 Days by Kiyoshi Tanaka (honestly my favorite book on here, I can re-read it in like 3 hours because I won’t stop for anything, that said it’s also maybe the darkest and most intense book here, not to say there aren’t cute and sweet moments lots of those, but also darkness, you’ve been warned)

114. Because You’ll Never Meet Me by Leah Thomas (great book) 

115. Just Between Us by J.H. Trumble

116. The Price of Falling by Melanie Tushmore

117. Highly Illogical Behavior by John Corey Whaley

118. Teenage Rewrite by Brandon Williams

119. What They Always Tell Us by Martin Wilson

120. Parrotfish by Ellen Wittlinger 

121. Turning 16 by Perie Wolford

122. A Boy Like Me by Jennie Wood

123. Suicide Watch by Kelley York (another good but dark book)

hope this is helpful to some one and I hope you find a book you enjoy, let me know I’d love to hear what people think when they read something from this list :) 

[Revised 11/1/17] Book Recommendations for Witches, Spellcasters, and the Curious

I periodically (usually once a year) make an updated post of my annotated bibliographies for witchcraft, magick, and divination studies. I recently noticed that I hadn’t done this in a long time! 

Since I’ve read a lot of new books in that time, and since many are worth adding, I thought I’d go ahead and post an updated list. 

I’ve added just ten new ones this time! Unfortunately, still, it’s getting quite long, so I’m splitting it into two posts - one for divination, and one for magick/witchcraft.  I will be tagging both as #long and #long+post because I realize this is pretty extreme in terms of length.

For Absolute Beginners

Encyclopedia of Witchcraft, by Judika Illes. Even better than the Weiser Field Guide to Witches - this book is huge and chock-full of information. It’ll explain in easy-to-understand language how the concept has developed throughout time, why witches do what they do, and different types of witches.

The Weiser Field Guide to Witches, by Judika Illes. This gives an excellent look at the historical lore concerning witches, from the perspective of a witch herself. It’s kind of tongue-in-cheek, but it does have some information that won’t be found elsewhere.

The Modern Guide to Witchcraft, by Skye Alexander. Great book for those who’re really absolute beginners and are wondering what witchcraft is all about. Skye takes a very postmodern, utilitarian, and unfailingly honest approach, and it’s geared towards those of almost any belief system.

Grimoire for the Apprentice Wizard, by Oberon Zell-Ravenheart. Attractively packaged and readible for almost all ages, this is a great (mostly) non-denominational look at the foundations of magical practice. It’s extremely detailed. Some of it only applies to Zell’s own tradition, but it’s quite useful, anyways.

Of Witchcraft and Whimsy, by Rose Orriculum. Written by Tumblr’s own @orriculum, this is one of the best, most modern an no-nonsense Craft introductory books I’ve seen. It’s unabashedly up-to-date and self-aware in its portrayal of the contemporary Craft.

Basic Techniques

Protection and Reversal Magick, by Jason Miller. This gets a little woo-woo at times, but he gives good advice on how to avoid serious problems that can come up as you begin to practice. Take with a grain of salt, though - some of this has the potential to make you feel paranoid.

City Magick, by Christopher Penczak. If you’re at all interested in tech witchery, or just want to practice magick within an urban setting, do check this out. It is by far the best look at the subject I’ve seen, and his discussion of urban tutelary spirits is worth the price alone.

Power Spellcraft for Life, by Arin Murphy-Hiscock. Nicely done, quite secular book providing basic beginner information regarding writing original spells and workings. It does fall prey to the trap of just listing correspondences with little information at times, but also contains a great deal of detail about ritual timing, raising power, and other topics essential for the beginner.

Sorcerer’s Secrets, by Jason Miller. This is a decent volume that describes a lot of techniques you don’t usually see in books, such as gesture and gaze-based magick. Be warned that Miller writes extensively about manipulative techniques, but it’s useful theory regardless of how you put it into practice.

Witch’s Bag of Tricks, by Melanie Marquis. This is not recommended for beginners, because the whole point of this book is to help existing practitioners refine and improve their already-established techniques. It’s got some novel ideas in it, and I like the author’s approach to symbolism in spellcasting.

Spirit Conjuring for Witches, by Frater Barrabbas. Frater B. is a very learned and rather famous magician and witch. This book is mostly geared towards Wicca, but even if you’re not Wiccan, his techniques are innovative and interesting, many utterly unlike anything I’ve seen elsewhere.

Direct Magick (Energy Work)

The Un-Spell Book, by Mya Om. This non-denominational guide to working with magical forces is filled with useful exercises that go beyond the author’s previous work. I recommend reading this after readingEnergy Essentials.

Instant Magick, by Christopher Penczak. Excellent beginner’s guide for those who don’t have access to a lot of fancy tools or prefer to work without them. This book won’t instantly teach you magick, but it will help even a seasoned practitioner find quicker, less-complicated ways of achieving results.

Energy Essentials for Witches and Spellcasters, by Mya Om. Though I balk at the use of the term “energy” to describe magical forces, this book is worth a look. It’s a bit like a workbook, with various exercises. Expect a lot of pseudoscience, though, and there are many religious references, but the techniques are solid.

Hedgewitchery and Astral Travel

Ecstatic Witchcraft, by Gede Parma. This is actually probably my favorite book on this subject, even though hedgeriding is only a part of what the book discusses. The only bad thing I can really say about this book is that it’s really not recommended for beginners, and it’s helpful to have the basics of visualization already mastered (for example) before doing the exercises Parma recommends.

By Land, Sky and Sea, by Gede Parma. This book goes into even greater details regarding different ways of conceptualizing the cosmology of hedgeriding, and I find it a very refreshing book that appreciatively draws from a number of different perspectives while grounding itself, so to speak, with the overarching metaphor of land, sky, and sea as the three worlds.

The Temple of Shamanic Witchcraft, by Christopher Penczak. Penczak is usually a pretty mixed bag, and this book is no exception. It gives a lot of good practical information and a very in-depth exploration of the three worlds (a useful concept), but it’s primarily framed by Wicca, so it might not resonate with those of other faiths and particularly those who aren’t pagan at all.

Ascension Magick, by Christopher Penczak. There’s a chapter or two in this that address alternate ways of conceptualizing the architecture of reality, and it’s pretty helpful for a hedgerider. Beyond that, this book is mostly about ceremonial magick, but it’s a (mostly) good book. Certain parts (such as the bit about UFOs) are a little off, in my opinion.

The Shamanic Witch, by Gail Wood. This book is really best suited for someone who practices Wicca and, besides the background info and cosmological descriptions, is really only useful in the context of that tradition. If you’re Wiccan or willing to pick around a lot of Wiccan-talk, though, this is a good foundation.

Witches, Werewolves and Fairies, by Claude Lecouteux. It can be hard to find scholarly works on these phenomena that are affordable, but here’s one I personally enjoyed. It details many accounts of journeying experienced by both pagans and Christians in earlier times, and gives a good description of the concept of the astral double, the architecture of the soul, and other topics throughout history.

Betwixt and Between, by Storm Faerywolf. This book is mostly a guide to the Feri tradition of witchcraft, but while I myself don’t practice that, those who do seem to know a lot about hedgeriding! The book has several chapters on the subject and is highly recommended for this reason.

The Psychic Energy Codex, by Michelle Belanger. A lot of people have strong opinions about this author, but this is book actually provides a lot of good information about so-called “energy work” which can be a step in the right direction for those wanting to ride the hedge.

Psychic Dreamwalking, by Michelle Belanger. In this book, Belanger discusses, essentially, how to use your non-waking life as a vehicle to for journeying, and while I myself don’t usually dreamwalk, much of what she says applies to hedgeriding in other states, too.

Hedge Rider by Eric De Vries. Considered a classic on this subject, this book contains a lot of good information on making the jump across the Hedge, but with a lot of editorializing about “true witchcraft,” etc. A mixed bag, but still recommended.

To Fly by Night, edited by Veronica Cummer. This is an anthology about hedgecraft by many different authors. The essays vary in quality but there’s something for everyone, and the text doesn’t shy away from tough topics, either.

Magical Writing, Words, and Symbols

Dictionary of Ancient Magic Words and Spells, by Claude Lecouteux. Mostly a historical text, this book isn’t exactly practical or terribly useful. It is, nevertheless, incredibly interesting. It’s a bit difficult to navigate, but worth a glance.

Composing Magick, by Elizabeth Barrette. A very general, but well-done, look at writing in a magical context. Some of the ritual templates are slightly specific to religious witchcraft traditions, but most information is widely applicable.

Crafting Magick with Pen and Ink, by Susan Pesnecker. Focuses both on the physical act of writing as a magical act, and the mental state associated with it. Highly recommended

The Modern Witchcraft Grimoire, by Skye Alexander. This book is for those who want to create their own grimoire. It gives fairly good advice for doing so, as well as providing hints and tricks for spellcasting and useful correspondences.

General Concepts

Practical Astrology for Witches and Pagans, by Ivo Dominguez, Jr. This book, unlike most astrology texts, won’t tell you much about interpreting a chart - instead, it’s an entire book on timing your magick with the stars!

Planetary Magick, by Melita Denning and Osborne Phillips. If you want to work with the planets at all, particularly in a highly ritualized context, I recommend this book. It’s large, comprehensive and gives a good foundation beyond what you find in general astrology books.

Practical Planetary Magick, by Sorita d’Este and David Rankine. Shorter than I would have liked, but a useful reference to have on your shelf, with excellent tables and appendices in the back. The meditations are also quite useful.

Practical Elemental Magick, by Sorita d’Este and David Rankine. Should be read alongside the other book by this pair. Comprehensive guide to working with the elements in a ritualized fashion. Not as accessible to newbies as Lipp’s book, but good for seasoned practitioners.

The Way of Four, by Deborah Lipp. Though mostly geared towards Wiccans, I found this author’s in-depth treatment of the four elements highly fascinating. I will note that it’s probably best to get the print version of this book, as it contains exercises and quizzes.

A Handbook of Saxon Sorcery and Magic, by Alric Albertsson. I really enjoyed this little book, which focuses on older magical traditions common among the ancient Saxons. It is very much introductory, but worth a read for those new to those traditions.

Ingredients and Correspondences

The Herbal Alchemist’s Handbook, by Karen Harrison. I cannot praise this book enough for its concise and well-formulated approach to astrology, herbs, and magick as a whole.

The Weiser Concise Guide to Herbal Magick, by Judith Hawkins-Tillirson. This is excellent for anyone who’s interested in any kind of magick. Yes, the focus is generally herbs, but there’s a lot to be learned here about Kabbalah and other correspondence systems, as well.

Mixing Essential Oils for Magic, by Sandra Kynes. Fills a very difficult gap in published knowledge regarding the use of essential oils by discussing, in great detail, how scents interact with each other and how to create a formula that’s not only palatable, but evocative.

Dunwich’s Guide to Gemstone Sorcery, by Gerina Dunwich. Given the New Age fascination with all things shiny, it was quite a chore to sort through the myriad crystal books to find something with good information. While far from perfect and not exactly devoid of fluff, this book does give a level of detail about the lore surrounding gemstones not seen in many other texts.

Real Alchemy, by Robert Allen Bartlett. Excellent book, lots of history and detail. There’s a strong focus on tradition within the text, yet the author is quite accommodating of his audience and describes alternate methods that work better in a modern context.

Spagyrics, by Manfred M. Junius. With a highly-developed academic tone and attention to detail, this book is a meaty look at traditional alchemy. I recommend this more for intermediate practitioners due to the sheer density of information.

The Hearth Witch’s Compendium, by Anna Franklin. This book is essentially a recipe book for various home remedies and magical purposes. For the most part, it focuses on healing work, but there’s some great tips in there for making your own cleaning products and such, too. Highly recommended.

Magical Housekeeping, by Tess Whitehurst. This is worth reading if you keep your own house/apartment and are looking for practical magical techniques for cleanliness and inviting harmony into your spaces. It could be more detailed, but I enjoyed it.

A Kitchen Witch’s Cookbook, by Patricia Telesco. This is a recipe book. It is mainly geared towards Wiccans and those who celebrate the eight sabbats, but the dishes are tasty and sure to please anyone.

Spellbooks

The Goodly Spellbook, by Dixie Deerman and Steve Rasmussen. The title sounds horribly fluffy, but this is a hidden gem. It explains obscure concepts like alternative alphabets and potential uses of musical notes, as well as plant lore and other bits and pieces. Definitely worth checking out. It’s way more than just “a book of spells.”

Encyclopedia of 5,000 Spells, by Judika Illes. The title sounds trite to some, but it delivers. This book has spells from almost every culture and spiritual philosophy, as well as a very detailed formulary. I read it when I’m bored sometimes, too, just because I always learn some tidbit from it.

Book of Spells, by Nicola Pulford. In most editions, this book is absolutely gorgeous and describes spellcasting traditions from a variety of perspectives and traditions. Recommended for those who already understand the basics, as this book jumps straight into spellcasting and gives only a small amount of information about how things work.

Ceremonial Magick

Modern Magick, by Donald Michael Kraig. I received this as a gift several years ago. It is essentially a workbook meant to be completed slowly, step by step, and while the format will not appeal to everyone, it’s a good easy-to-read introduction to ceremonial magick.

Familiar Spirits, by Donald Tyson. Though geared towards ceremonialists, any practitioner can likely learn a thing or two from Tyson’s interesting stroll through the whys and wherefores of spirit work and thoughtform creation. This is by far the best book I’ve seen on the topic of familiar spirits.

Secrets of High Magick, by Francis Melville. The most recent edition of this (the one I own) is lavishly-illustrated and full of rudimentary, yet useful information. He stresses the basics of ceremonial practice, and his writing style is very accessible. Highly recommended for absolute beginners.

My Life With The Spirits, by Lon Milo DuQuette. This is a memoir of a ceremonial magician, but it gives a good look at the magickal mindset in a highly developed form from someone who’s experienced quite a lot. I havemajor issues with DuQuette’s approach to Qabalah, but his memoirs are worth a read.

Chaos Magick

Liber Null and Psychonaut, by Peter Carroll. Classic book of chaos magick. I consider it required reading for almost anyone interested in the occult. Even if you have no love for chaos magick, do give it a read, just to understand how influential Carroll is, and why.

Hands-On Chaos Magic, by Andrieh Vitimus. Knowing some of the people involved in the creation of this book, I’m a bit biased towards it. That said, even if I didn’t know them, I would still recommend it. It’s especially interesting to read alongside Liber Null and Psychonautin order to see how the chaos “current” has developed over the years.

Pop Culture Magic 2.0 by Taylor Ellwood. There aren’t a lot of books on using pop culture symbolism in magick, but this one is nearly perfect. The author writes in a highly erudite, literate fashion, while still being accessible to newbies. Many useful resources cited, as well, so prepare to branch off a bit while reading it.

History-Related

Triumph of the Moon, by Ronald Hutton. An inside no-holds-barred look at the history of Wicca and Modern paganism. Highly recommended. This is sort of the book that fluffbunnies don’t want you to read.

Book of Lies: The Disinformation Guide to Magick and the Occult, by Richard Metzger. Lots of facts and history of magick in the context of Postmodernity. This is different from the Crowley text of the same name, which I wouldn’t recommend unless you want to focus on his tradition.

The Place of Enchantment, by Alex Owen. This is a purely historical text that documents the occult revival within the context of Modernity. I remember it being very good, but please realize I haven’t really picked it up much since graduating, and it might just have served my mindset at the time.

For @abloodneed, one of the most amazing, beautiful men alive. Thank you for always being you.

There were certain things that Magnus feared. The loss of a loved one—his mind flashed to quick strides, dark hair and hazel eyes—, the loss of a friend—his breath caught at the image of dark eyes, dark hair streaked with grey, twin horns, and skin grown cold—, and the loss of his children—the downworlders he’d taken underneath his wings. His fingers dug into the oak coffee table, scouring the wood as his mind supplied him with images of everyone of them that he’d lost. Drawing in breath was hard, like he was suffocating, a direct contradiction to the cool breeze wafting into the outdoor patio of the mundane bar he’d decided to visit. Sometimes, he just needed that time to himself, amongst the mundanes that entertained him with how they scurried about in their daily lives, unaware of the world that existed in the shadows.

He did just that at the moment, watching them go about their lives when suddenly, everything… froze. From the waiter who had been heading to his table, to the lovers celebrating their recent engagement. Even the late night dog walker and her dog were frozen in place, her with a hand halfway up her hair, and the dog with his tongue half pulled into his mouth. As he took in the the sight, everyone frozen as far as he could he could see, and as he heard those footsteps, calm and unhurried, that oozing mass of power that would cower a lesser man, have them scurrying away or bending their heads in submission, Magnus came face to face with his biggest fear.

“Drinking alone,” a voice he’d heard only once in his life and had hoped he would never hear again wafted out to him, moments before the owner of the voice slid into the seat across from him. White suit—expensive as expected, stretched over a tall lanky form. “Now that doesn’t suit you Magnus,” he drawled as he casually shrugged off the jacket, undid the diamond studded cufflinks so he could roll up his sleeves and show off his forearms. Long lean fingers reached up to run through hair that was kept in place by the crown of barbed wire on his head. He waved his hands and men—shapeshifting demons, Magnus was sure—who’d accompanied him all gave them a wide berth.

“And how would you know what suits or doesn’t suit me,” Magnus tossed back as he reached for his glass of bourbon. “You don’t know me.”

The man grinned, teeth sharp in the moonlight. “Now, now Magnus. Why would you say that? Is that how you speak to your father?”

Magnus raised a brow and took a sip of his bourbon, eyes hard as he stared back at Asmodeus.

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(Newt Scamander x Reader) The Case’s Secret [SMUT]

Title : The Case’s Secret

Request : Yes - anonymous -  I luv your blog and your writing so much !!! Anyway i was wondering if i could request a smutty newt scamander imagine of maybe the reader walking in on newt’s “private time” with himself 👀 if you get my meaning and its just super awkward and funny (hopefully you understand) please and thank you!

Smut : HELL YEAH

Word Count : 1,459

Summary : You caught newt masturbating

A/N : one request down, still more to go! for those of you who requested, please be patient because i choose the request on my will, not according to the list. Because i dont want to be forced to write something when i dont have the inspiration for it. And also, requests are still open! Enjoy this one!

Sequel : http://frostyiceberg.tumblr.com/post/155435491004/newt-scamander-x-reader-spicy-vanilla-smut

————————–

There are grunting sounds coming from Newt’s case.

It had been a rough day for both of you and Newt, as the Niffler had escaped again. You and him was planning to visit Hogwarts, Albus Dumbledore himself invited Newt personally after his success on publishing the book. You and Newt wanted to grab some things in the Diagon alley until the little thief escaped.

The two of you chased it through Diagon alley, almost losing it before you lured the Niffler with the sapphire necklace Newt gave you.

Newt was almost hysterical when you did, but he was thankful when you swiftly caught the Niffler and turned it upside down, emptying the little bugger’s pocket. People were a bit angry when they found out the Niffler took their missing stuffs, but you managed to calm them down before Newt got swallowed by the anger of those wizards.

You were going to grab some dinner, but you lost your sack of money and Newt’s was stolen by the Niffler. It’d be impossible to take it from the creature, so you decided to head back to Newt’s old house.

The house was passed down from his parents’, and Theseus, his brother, also got one, but bigger and grander. His brother has always been everyone’s favorite. But it didn’t discourage him, since the house is very cozy.

As you had expected, the house is fairly dirty, with lots of Newt’s books everywhere. He used to keep his most of his beasts in this house, but then he moved them into the magic suitcase. Casting the spell, a wind swept through the house, taking the dust in its way.

Both of you sighed in delight, and he set down his case in the middle of the room, in front of the unlit fireplace and amidst the couch. He stepped into the case, and disappearead without any sound. You shook your head. He always puts his creature before himself.

You decided to cook dinner, using vegetables overgrowing in his small garden. ‘Didn’t know Newt loved to plant too,’ you thought to yourself, swinging your wand to the selected crops. ‘Probably to feed his beasts,’ you think again. The crops floated in the air, following you to the kitchen.

You made an onion stew, something to warm the two of you up after the long day. You used magic with everything to cook, something you don’t usually do. Once the stew was ready, you let it be in the pot, with low heat, so it would be warm when you and Newt are ready to eat.

That’s when you approached his case and hear those grunting sounds.

“Newt?” you call out. You’re replied with some more grunting and panting sound, also a whimper of your name.

It sounds like he’s in pain, so you immediately jump into the case, landing with a loud thud. The room is not the usual Newt’s workplace; it’s a dimly lit room with soft looking sofa in the corner of the room, a coffee table in the middle, and other homely furniture.

The grunting abruptly stops, and you’re eye to eye with a shocked Newt, sitting on the couch, holding his manhood in hand.

He shoves his penis into his pants, and then straightens his shirt and his trousers, trying to look decent despite him being caught red handed.

“[N-Name], I swear I can explain this,” he stutters nervously, his hands wiping onto his trousers.

“I, uh… I don’t really know what to say…”

“I-I’m so sorry…”

“No Newt, you’re not wrong, I, um, I’ll leave you to it if you want…?”

“N-No, it’s okay, I’m sorry about this…”

“Well… Do you want me to help you?” you offer him, shyly taking steps towards the sweating man. You raise your hand and wipe his sweat, and kiss him on the cheek. “Only if you want to though,” you add with another kiss.

“It would be my pleasure, b-but, are you sure?”

You answer him by kneeling in front of him and pull down the zipper of his trousers. His breath hitches on his throat when you put a finger on the wet part of his underwear. You rub the spot teasingly, trying to see the expression Newt makes when you do so.

“[N-Name]… Please… I-I need you…” he begs.

“Is it what you want baby?

“Y-Yes… Please…”

You happily oblige his pleas and pull down his underwear in one quick motion, making his cock springs free. He hisses when his cock meets the cold air, the sudden temperature taking him by surprise.

Your… Sexy time with Newt has never been in this situation before. It will always be him, giving you, and it’s always vanilla. He never demands anything from you, even though you tend to ask or offer him the pleasure he deserves. And this time is your rare chance.

“Ooh… [Name]…”

You wrap your fingers around the shaft, while your thumb makes a circular motion on the tip, spreading the precum on the already slick head. You mercilessly pump his manhood in a slow pace, and he groans in frustration.

“Aaaaghh, [Name], please, please…”

If you didn’t have a heart for this man, you wouldn’t stop being this slow. Heck, you wouldn’t even give him the treatment. But this is Newt Scamander, and you would do anything to make him happy.

You pick up the pumping pace with your hand as you lick the tip of his cock, swiftly enveloping the head with your mouth. You hollow your cheeks, sucking the head before slowly releasing your finger and take him deeper.

He moans loudly when you do so, and out of the corner of your eye, you see him gripping the handrest of the sofa powerfully that it turns his knuckle white.

Not wanting him to hurt himself, you take his cock out of your mouth. He immediately looks at you, face full with confusion. You take both of his hands, kisses both of them, and place it on both sides of your head.

“Don’t hold it by yourself Newt,” you say, looking up to him.

“B-But… I don’t want to hurt you…”

“You won’t.”

Before he can object to anything, you take his cock into your mouth again, this time sucking harder than before. He arches his head back, letting out a scream of your name. His hands on the side of your head remain frozen, until you start bobbing your head.

He loses control slowly, then all at once. The next thing you know is tears little by little coming out of your eyes as you try to maintain the fast pace. Newt is grunting and groaning as the tension builds up in his cock.

“I-I’m coming, a-aah!!”

Hot semen spurts into your mouth, and you cough, choking on it. But then, you swallow some that remains in your mouth. Newt, after regaining his senses, looks horrified. The sight of you all sweaty and dirty with his cum makes his cock slowly rise again, but he tries to hide it.

“O-Oh Merlin, what have I done? [Name], are you alright?”

You wipe your mouth and the spilled semen with your shirt, and you can hollowly feel the salty taste still remains in your mouth.

“Yes, Newt, I am alright. How about you? Did you enjoy it?”

“I-I do, but good God you’re crying! Did I hurt you?”

“No Newt, it’s fine really! I’m okay, see?”

You lift yourself and sit beside him, swiping his messy, sweaty hair and kiss his forehead.

“You don’t need to apologize, sweetheart. You deserve every single good thing in this world.”

“But…”

“No buts. Now… How did you conjure this room? I didn’t know you have this in your case!”

“W-Well… It was meant to be a room to relax for myself… But I may have misused it…”

“Hmm… You naughty boy.”

“O-Oh, but I am your naughty boy…”

You pinch him on the cheeks, kissing him on the lips after doing so.

“Now… Do you want to continue…?”

“I’d love to… But… I think I smell something burning…”

You lift your head from his face, sniffing into the air. And as Newt said, there really is something burning.

“Oh no!! My stew!! Sorry baby, we have to do this later. Come up when you’re ready for dinner, alright?” you say before frantically climbing up out of the case.

Newt, on the other hand, still sweaty and tired, smiles to himself as he sees you disappear from his sight. He will definitely repay you tonight, taking a ‘dessert’ for his own after eating the dinner you make.

“Newt? Come on up! Let’s eat!”

And he will definitely hear his name being screamed later.

Coffee Mugs - Bucky Barnes

- Sorry for not posting in forever. I’ve been so busy and then had the worst writers block. // This started out as a late night drabble, but now it’s kind of an imagine. Enjoy. - Also: my requests are open. I write Marvel and Criminal Minds!

— Bucky drinks coffee to try and get rid of his problems

Warnings: None.

—————————————————————

Steam billowed around the coffee that sat in a plain grey mug on the kitchen table. Stark Tower was rarely cold, but winter in New York was out to bite this year.

Sat, looking at his mug was Bucky. Tired, and alone at nearly midnight. He was expressionless, sleep deprivation shone across his skin as he mumbled aimlessly about things he needed to remember - worthless things, but he needed them.

He looked out the window, the glowing streets of New York staring back at him. The lights seemed so dark at night, yet so bright. He felt happier at night, safer. He never knew why, but he didn’t like to question it either.

“Well the city never sleeps…so that makes two of us, huh?” He mumbled to himself, picking up his mug and wandering over to the window where he continued to stare at the city.

The door clicked behind him. He didn’t respond because for once, he didn’t feel threatened. He knew who it was from their footsteps.

“You’re up late,” You greeted him, “Coffee, baby, really?” You sighed.

“I wanted to make sure you were alright. Is that a crime now?” He raised his eyebrow at you, and you rolled your eyes back at him. He smiled as you placed down your bags.

“How is she anyway?” He asked, placing down the mug once again. “Peggy’s doing okay. She talked a lot, stayed on track, which was good. Then I had to get Tony’s equipment from the store. It took longer than I thought.” You gestured to the bags.

“I’m glad. I would go and see her but…I don’t want to hurt her.” You frowned, looking back at him. “I think she’d love to see you.”

“Really?” He asked, dumbfounded, “She mentioned you, asking how you were. You mean a lot to Steve, so you mean a lot to Peggy too.”

“I never thought about it like that.” He admitted, his eyes growing heavier as he looked at his mug, dregs of coffee remained, and he cursed it for making him even more tired.

“C'mon, Buck. Let’s go to sleep.” You smiled, stretching out your hand, waiting for him. “Do your bags not need to go away? Or, uh, taking to the labs? What about those emails you mentioned?”

“Bucky!” You exclaimed, grabbing his hand firmly. “You can’t be scared to go to sleep. I know you hate Buck, but you need to try. You can’t live off coffee forever, trust me, I’ve tried. Please. I love you, and you need to sleep.” He glanced at his pyjama clad legs and frowned. “I’ll be right next to you. Nothing bad will happen.”

He anxiously trailed behind you, waiting for you, or anyone, or anything, to do something that meant he wouldn’t have to sleep.

You two lay in bed for a few minutes, for Bucky it felt like hours, before he began to ramble in avoidance. “Hey, babe?”

“Yes, Bucky?” You mumbled, sleep trying to capture you. “Does mike wazowski blink or wink?”

You laughed slightly, tiredly, “I don’t know Bucky. We’ll find out tomorrow, yeah?”

“Fine.” He huffed, “I love you, Bucky.”

“I love you too.”

And soon enough, he fell asleep.

When the pale pink sunlight flowed through the curtains, Bucky groaned, placing the pillow that you had previously been sleeping on over his head. He knew that you had to leave early to finish a mission with Sam and Steve, but he still missed you.

He rolled over, disregarding the pillow falling onto the floor, throwing the covers back and standing. He rubbed his eyes, pushing his messy brown hair behind his ears.

Forcing himself into the once again empty kitchen, he started to use to coffee machine once more. He stood for a while, waiting for its magic.

His eyes skimmed the room, noticing his old coffee cup still on the sideboard from the night prior, but a piece of paper now sat beside it.

“If you ask me, Mike Wasowski is definitely winking…he seems like that kind of guy.” He read, laughing to himself.

I’ve kept this chapter quite fluffy and cute, and happily domestic too. It should tide over nicely into the next chapter where the drama picks up again. Hope you all enjoy!

Prompt[s]: That was…kinda expected, given you write so sweetly, but a HUG? Like, a nervous, full-on body touching, consoling hug? That’s new, for sure… I love it!

Oh my god. This was just wow. I can’t even. Im giggling like a damn school girl

..so she lives there, now, huh? Can we expect some “domestic” fluff or is that too much to ask?

‘The Tower’ (Part 15)

Part 14

Loki was still awake. He hadn’t slept all night. He couldn’t explain it but there was something… strange, and new, about knowing that when you awoke that morning, you would have no intention of leaving. You were actually here to stay. He had company; company he… enjoyed.

“Good morning,” came a sleepy voice from the bedroom doorway. Loki turned and cleared his throat. You yawned and stretched, rubbing the sleep from your eyes before trudging further into the room. You were still in your clothes from the night before, tattered and damaged from your run through the forest, but evidently still suitable for sleeping in.
“Good morning,” he replied.

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anonymous asked:

hc's for the paladins most memorable/passionate kiss with their s/o? when did it happen? why did it happen? how was it? how did it feel??? i must know!!! (i super love love LOVE your writing btw)

Ugh this question is an attempt on my life I swear. But thank you none the less! I am but your guys humble servant~

Shiro

-It happened at night, out on a balcony with a million stars shining over head

-He had bought tickets to a swanky gala, wanting to take s/o on a romantic night out complete with dancing and getting all gussied up

-They were the best looking couple there, they had a real cinderella moment with all eyes on them as they practically floated along the dance floor

-They step outside for a breather and they are standing so close and he can count all of their eyelashes and see the moon reflected in their eyes and hes breathless and the only thing he can say is “I love you”

-Its the first time he has said it and s/o is glowing and Shiro is tingling all over and he just goes in for the kiss without another thought and its all perfect

Keith

-He didn’t even know it was going to happen, it was a spontaneous wonderful moment fueled by adrenaline 

-Keith had been training with s/o, they had been begging him for the longest time but he was hesitant cause he didn’t want them to throw themselves into battle but well maybe it was better if they were able to protect themselves

-It was a long road to getting them to his standards, a lot of sweat, tears and bruises. The ultimate goal for s/o was to be able to take him down just once

-Then one day, ONE DAY, all those hours of frustration come to a boiling point and its like the heavens opened up and they saw an opening in his stance. They didn’t think twice as they took the chance and Keith suddenly found himself flat on his back

-At first s/o thinks that he is going to be angry or at the very least come back twice at hard but instead they find him laughing. Hes grinning and before they can begin to question his sanity he pulls them in for a kiss. Its short but sweet and filled with this admiration that can’t be described in any words

Pidge

-She isn’t one for casual pda so her most memorable kiss was definetly her first kiss

-She had been trying to avoid thinking about it the entire night, she had been the one to suggest going out on a real proper date and she knew that a kiss was almost inevitable but it still made her nervous

-To try and combat these nerves she tried to plan a night full of activities, a whole tour of interesting sights on a nearby planet. They actually had a lot of fun acting like completely unapologetic tourists and for awhile Pidge was able to relax

-It was so much different spending time with s/o one on one that Pidge finally actually felt like this was a real relationship and it made her chest feel tight but in a good way and she couldn’t stop smiling

-Just as the last of the suns were going down and they were enjoying food they could actually stomach on the roof of the tallest building watching all the colors melt into each other she finally did it. She leaned in and kissed s/o

-It was soft and not super involved, nothing more than a crashing of lips against each other for a few seconds but it was what really stands out in each of their minds as the moment they became a real couple

Lance

-He can probably remember each and every kiss hes had with s/o cause this boy is secretly a huge sweetheart. He is also very cheesey and has an anniversary for every small accomplishment in their relationship

-Except being a doofus he forgets his biggest anniversary, the one where they actually started dating. So he thinks that s/o is just being cute and romantic with the blanket fort and movie night. Completely oblivious to what significance this date has

-Then as s/o is stroking his hair and feeding him popcorn, making him feel pampered and loved, they ask him if this has been a good one year anniversary date and he is FREAKING OUT because how could he FORGET hes a terrible BOYFRIEND 

-He starts to promise them the entire god damn world in order to apologize. He offers to arrange the stars to spell out their names in the sky together and shut up he has a magic mechanical lion he totally can s/o just give him a chance

-S/o is just laughing so hard and its contagious and Lance realizes just how ridiculous he is actually sounding. He laughs with them and they are both in tears and cuddling and then he doesn’t realize it but they are suddenly kissing and s/o is just so warm and happy with him that it amazes him. He wants to make sure to make them this happy forever

Hunk

-He totally planned the perfect night, he wanted to do something special for s/o and wanted to make it super rememorable for both of them. Not for any special occasion but just because he thought that they deserved to be swept off their feet

-And it certainly was a night to remember but mostly because everything he tried to do just ended up in total disaster. A real infamous day for the history books of their relationship
-He burned the dinner, the fancy jewelry he meant to place on the dessert plate actually got baked into the cake which ended up on his plate and made him break a tooth, he grabbed the wrong candles meaning the nice vanilla scented ones were instead Pidge’s prank candles that acted as screaming sparklers that couldnt be put out and his nice clothes got shrunk in the washer so he was left trying to squeeze in a shirt two sizes too small

-Hes so embarrassed and sulking, he just wanted this one night to be perfect and he thought he was romantic but it turns out hes nothing but a screw up. He is hiding in the kitchen, spread out on the floor and looking up at the ceiling wondering how he ever thought he could pull this off

-S/o joins him on the floor with a pint of ice cream, massaging his head and trying to talk him out of this because they still managed to have fun and the thought it what counts ect ect but Hunk is being stubborn and while he accepts the ice cream still wishes he had managed to make things special

-It is then that s/o informs him that any moment that they get to spend with him is so much more special that he could ever know. The sunshine boy is flustered and hearts are floating around his head and he can’t stop himself from pulling s/o on top of him and kissing them cause those words meant more to him than they would ever know  

Hogwarts AU! Monsta X

Shownu

House: Gryffindor
Favorite Subject: Apparition
Quidditch Position: Keeper

A very respectful, soft spoken, and studious Prefect. Everyone expects a lot from him as a wizard, expecting him to land a job in the Ministry of Magic as soon as he graduates. Students from other houses are often intimidated by him, but Son Hyunwoo is commonly thought of as “The Father of Gryffindor” among the people of his house. Although he isn’t particularly vocal about it, he only wants the best for his peers and will look out for them constantly. Not a bossy Prefect or anything of the sort, but is straightforward with scolding to the point his “You shouldn’t do that”s and “It isn’t particularly kind”s prevent people from doing tricky things out of guilt. Although most believe it’s only natural for someone like him to excel at a subject as difficult as Apparition, many express their worry towards his pursuit in such a dangerous concept. Still, Shownu doesn’t fear the risks and is rather capable of himself anyways. You may find him with his broomstick, probably a recent Nimbus model, training. He often helps his teammates, but his training session is not limited to them exclusively. Shownu is willing to train with anyone who asks, and often does so with his fellow Prefect Wonho. His role as a Keeper only adds to the misconception of his personality, but those who truly fear him are those who are up against his team in a Quidditch match. Chasers often how to score with Shownu blocking shots, and some even question whether or not he uses some sort of spell or charm to be that level of excellence.

Wonho

House: Hufflepuff
Favorite Subject: Care of Magical Creatures
Quidditch Position: Beater

His fear of heights is hardly evident because he’s such a diligent Quidditch player. Labelled as “Wonho” by many ー including a few professors ー Shin Hoseok gets his nickname due to his role as a Beater. His Quidditch team never has to fear Bludgers hitting them because Wonho is very reliable, he’s even taken the blow for teammates (which earn him minor concussions and other injuries as a result). If anyone confronts him to ask why he flies despite being acrophobic, he’ll smile and say his fear is “exactly why he plays!”. His owl was his mother’s pet when she attended the school, and Wonho literally writes to her at every opportunity. He’s the Prefect of Hufflepuff, and he’ll do his best to aid anyone regardless of their year or house. The role was a surprise to many due to his mischievous nature during his first few years in Hogwarts (he was frequent in the Detention Chambers and often caused ruckus with his brooms and potions). He eventually grew out of those actions the more he became dedicated to the Quidditch team, but he does love a good prank or two here and there. He’s practically the human embodiment of the infamous phrase “Mischief Managed”. He has a deep love and respect for creatures of any kind, which is very evident in his favorite class, Care of Magical Creatures. When he’s not spending time in the Training Grounds, he can often be found in the Owlery located at the West Tower.

Minhyuk

House: Hufflepuff
Favorite Subject: Defense Against the Dark Arts
Quidditch Position: Beater

Unlike fellow Hufflepuff Hoseok, Lee Minhyuk has yet to grow out of his mischievous ways. Unmanaged mischief as one might call him, as he proves to be a nuisance with his “playful acts” and spells he often casts. He is at least able to make up for the points he loses for his house by absolutely excelling at Defense Against the Dark Arts. Students both experienced and inexperienced challenge him to fuels quite often, though with his quick wit, keen evasion and deflection, as well as a natural gift for picking up spells, Minhyuk is practically a dueling champion. Despite having beaten most of the school, no one can stay mad at the bundle of sunshine for long. His outgoing, friendly personality earns him quite a bunch of friends regardless of what year and house they’re in. His sharp reflexes not only serve him well in Duels, but also in Quidditch. He and Wonho make an excellent Beater Duo, as they hardly allow their team to sustain any Bludger-related injuries during games. He does, however, have a habit of sending Bludgers towards the audiences by accident. He has a pet rat with a mischievous mind of its own, and the rodent often chews through his books and clothes and even nibbles marks into his cauldron. Because of this, Minhyuk is commonly seen roaming the halls with holes in his robes, stray papers and wand trapped in his arms as he asks his peers if he can borrow their textbooks for a class or two. Filch’s favorite person to pick on, apparently it took a lot of convincing on Minhyuk’s part to stop Mrs Norris from taking his pet rat for dinner.  The only time you’ll see Minhyuk upset is when he gets a Howler from his parents consulting him about his mischief.

Kihyun

House: Ravenclaw
Favorite Subject: Transfiguration
Quidditch Position: Chaser

A typical Ravenclaw, many students wonder why he wasn’t appointed as a Prefect. Rumor has it that he actually declined the offer in his 5th year because he didn’t want to take even more responsibility. Although he doesn’t like to admit it, Kihyun really does look after his peers and definitely does a good job with it. To other Ravenclaws, Yoo Kihyun is much like the mother of their house. He sets a good example for all younger students, and many aspire to be as intelligent, wise, and studious as he is. He is often found in the library, though you’d have to do a bit of looking as he makes a habit of going to a different section each visit. That way he’s able to broaden his knowledge about anything he goes for, and some people wonder if he’s used a spell that helps him contain all the impossibly large amount of knowledge he has (that is, if such a spell even exists). If he’s not in the library, he often maintains the Ravenclaw common room and keeps an eye out for anyone attempting to sneak out or so. House points are very important to him, and it’s like he loses one year of his life span when a Ravenclaw loses points in his presence. He’s the type of student who will correct others or assist them when they mess up a spell, and will definitely help those who have the courage to approach him. Kihyun is actually very respectful and sweet so long as you’ve got a good attitude! He has a knack for all subjects, but especially exceeds in Transfiguration. His friends (especially Minhyuk!) warn other students to avoid angering him because he might just turn them into an animal for awhile. (He probably has, but he doesn’t do that sort of thing in vain so the kid must have deserved it)
He’d rather pursue his education and definitely go for a job as an Auror or something, but on the rare occasion he plays Quidditch for his house he turns out to be a very excellent (and competitive!) Chaser.


Hyungwon

House: Slytherin
Favorite Subject: Charms
Quidditch Position: Seeker

His ravishing looks and house he was sorted in often leads to much misinterpretation, Chae Hyungwon is kinder than he seems. Although undeniably witty and at times even sassy, he has a genuinely kind heart and is nicer than he gives himself credit for. The way he moves through the halls with such elegance and grace often causes people to label him as another vile, Pureblooded Slytherin, but he actually doesn’t care much for blood status and is probably only giving such a gaze because he just woke up from a nap. He falls asleep often, knows the best places in the school to take naps but often gets away with it. Occasionally people will attempt to cast a spell on him or do some sort of prank while he’s in slumber, but he is very much aware of his surroundings when asleep. Hyungwon may seem like someone who slacks off or doesn’t pay attention, but he really does have good intentions and it often goes unnoticed. Overall he’s very much misunderstood, and unfortunately little get to know how pleasant this Slytherin truly is. The only time he actually gets recognition is with Charms, where he is praised for his exceptional skill. He is also an excellent Seeker, though most refuse to admit it. A habit of his is staying still for a long period of time during a match, only to move if he locates the Snitch or if a Bludger comes his way.

Jooheon

House: Gryffindor
Favorite Subject: Muggle Studies
Quidditch Position: Chaser

Hailing from a Pureblood family, Lee Jooheon doesn’t get much exposure to the Muggle World. This is why Muggle Studies fascinates him, and he takes great pleasure in discovering anything about their culture. Muggle music in particular always seems to strike his fancy.
He does have a bit of trouble with magic and what not, though the spells he casts are undeniably powerful. Jooheon enjoys being around enchanted fauna and flora, though they don’t treat him particularly well in return. He’s probably sustained an injury or two from getting trampled by a Hippogriff, pecked by a Phoenix… it still doesn’t reduce his affection towards them, though.
Many students deem him as someone scary, but those who get to know him wonder why the Sorting Hat placed him in Gryffindor rather than Hufflepuff. He’s very kind, and the smile he gives off is contagious even to his teachers (most of the time). The most avid letter writer during the summer, his friends are used to getting a letter from him first. He also likes to write to his parents to tell them about his experiences at the school, and he occasionally gets gifts delivered to him in return. Jooheon considers Hyunwoo as “his rival”, yet somehow considers him as a father away from home.

Changkyun

House: Ravenclaw
Favorite Subject: Potions
Quidditch Position: Seeker

There are two ways in perceiving Changkyun; he is either “too quiet” or “too odd”. Frankly, he is neither. (He may have a skeptical, different way of thought, but it always seems to work in his favor) He’s a bit of a lone wolf due to these misinterpretations, but he has all the friends he needs. When he isn’t being selfless and mature, his sense of humor shines through. He gets even professors laughing, at least most of the time. Changkyun has a bit of a record with spells going awry, and potions causing safety hazards. It’s not that he’s bad at magic, he’s actually very good, he just likes to experiment as much as he can and it doesn’t always end up successful. When they are, however, prepared to be amazed because his good potions are so well brewed, he might as well rewrite instructions of his own to replace the textbook’s.
Everyone seems to wonder Changkyun’s strategy as Ravenclaw’s Seeker ー including his own team members. They don’t know how he does it, one match he might stay still the majority of the time, another he’ll be flying around wilder than the Bludgers. Sometimes you’ll barely catch a glimpse of him; but no matter what he does the match often ceases with a loud declaration of “Lim Changkyun has caught the Snitch! Ravenclaw wins!”, and he descends to the ground while holding the winged gold orb in his hands triumphantly.

anonymous asked:

Your book looks fun, but do you worry sometimes that it looks like a YA paranormal romance, which might be outdated? Like maybe I just haven't read enough about it yet, I'm sorry if this comes across as mean, I'm genuinely curious. Thanks for all the fic your write!

Okay so my goal when writing Not So Shore was to take all the tropes I loved from the done-to-death ‘mortals meet’ genre of fanfic (the fun of the reader having information the point of view character doesn’t, dropping subtle references to the canon characters’ powers and experiences, having everyone be in awe of how cool the canon characters are) and write them without any of the horrible negative tropes that always seem to feature in those fics (over the top jealousy, slut shaming, unnecessary violence, no subtlety anywhere to be seen). I had so much fun writing it, and the response from all of you suggests you had fun reading it, too.

And I’m basically trying to do a very similar thing with my novel. I grew up riding the wave of popular Paranormal YA. I was there for the publication of Twilight and the thousands of series inspired by it. I’ve read most of them, because as a child I adored the stories of people like me visiting magical lands (Alice in Wonderland, HP, PJO, Narnia, LotR [in which the people like me are the hobbits lol], etc.) so it seemed a natural extension that as I entered my teen years I would follow this genre to its teenage equivalent.

It was supposed to be like the fantasy I loved reading, but darker and more mature, with slightly more graphic violence and more adult risks and consequences. But in its hormone ridden angst, Paranormal YA/Urban Fantasy lost a lot of the things that made me fall in love with fantasy in the first place.

  • Gone was the focus on proving yourself worthy by doing good deeds and helping others; Instead you had to be snarky and “not like other girls” and worry more about your love interest than the fate of the world.
  • Instead of quests completed by fire-forged friends, the only relationships developed (and I use that word loosely, in some cases) over the course of the books were the romantic ones. Friends were always pushed aside, no one ever understood the protagonist, but the protagonist never tried to get anyone to understand, because they were dark and moody and needed to do things on their own -
  • Except, oh, no, they can’t do it on their own, because they’re a girl, and so they’re just going to sort of dither about before their big, strong male love interest comes along to save the day with physical violence. The protagonists rarely had the power, even when they were ‘the chosen one’ or when they should have had the opportunity to grow over the course of the novel. Or if they did have power, it was often so poorly developed that it just read like a massive deus-ex-machina invented purely for the finale.
  • Their male love interests were rude to the point of abusive, had no sense of appropriate personal boundaries, and treated the protagonists as idiots who had to be talked down to at every opportunity, rather than people who were discovering entirely new worlds and were entitled to ask some questions.
  • Protagonists no longer had strong morals; instead they flipped back and forth between choices (often between two love interests, hurting both in the process) and were reactive to circumstances changing around them, rather than forces for change.
  • Dialogue was no longer inspiring, something to repeat to myself on dark days, to remind myself that there was always some good worth fighting for. Instead, everything was one of two extremes: It had to be sassy and referential, or it had to be so pretentious and faux-philosophical that no teenager alive would ever dare utter it for fear of eternal ridicule.

(This is not so say, of course, that the fantasy books I had enjoyed as a child did not have their own faults. They were overwhelmingly cast with straight, white men, or straight, white women who weren’t anywhere near as well developed. Any other diversity was hard to find, and women as romantic interests were often treated as props or rewards. Trouble was, these problematic aspects carried over into Paranormal YA/Urban Fantasy without bringing most of the good stuff with them.)

Obviously not every single Paranormal YA/Urban Fantasy was as disastrous as I am describing them here. But enough were for it to become a well known fact among the industry and readers that Paranormal YA was formulaic to the point where if you had read one you’d read fifty. I still loved the concept of the genre, obviously, or I wouldn’t have kept reading it, but the execution was letting me down.

So in my novel I’m taking the things I love about it - the mystery, the magic, the overlap of our world with something so entirely new and different hovering just beyond our perception, characters and things from that new world crossing over to ours, the dark overtones and the threat of real danger and violence - and I’m adding all the things I adored from fantasy back in, and putting the emphasis on female friendship.

YA has taken great leaps forward in terms of representation of marginalised groups, less problematic love interests, and more unique plotting, all of which is so amazing and absolutely fantastic to read. But I still find close, supportive, realistic female friendships lacking, and as most of the books I read are written by women I always find this preference to have their female protagonists always hanging out with guys puzzling. So although there is a romance between my female protagonist and a male character, it’s tertiary, behind the plot and the core group of female friends that drive it forward. I’ve tried to write each of the girls as unique individuals rather than stereotypes, as characters with their own goals and personalities and no tokenism, and I hope that their friendship reads as strongly and sincerely to you as it does to me.

I’m hoping that this distinction, the focus on characters and the relatively less-popular type of mythology I’ve decided to write about will be enough to convince a publisher to give me a chance. (The Raven Cycle series by Maggie Stiefvater is the series that comes closest to what I’m trying to achieve in terms of tone and themes with my novel, which also gives me hope that there’s still a market for it. Although obviously I am nowhere near as skilled a writer as Maggie, and I can only aspire to one day be anywhere near her level.)

So, to finally come to the end of this extremely long winded answer to your relatively straight-forward question: This novel is like my love letter to everything I enjoyed about growing up reading Paranormal YA and Urban Fantasy, but with modern day priorities and diversity included, and all the shit bits thrown out (hopefully).

anonymous asked:

Hi! First of all I love your art and I love you <3 Secondly, I want to start a comic of my own but I’m not sure how to do it. I have the briefest of the brief ideas for it but I have no idea how to develop it, plan it, stretch out the story, develop the characters and the such. Could I have some hints please?

Hello and Thank You!!!! I’m not sure if you’re talking about a fan comic or an original, or long or short but I’ll give you some tips. GRANTED I am not a professional and you may find a different way that is easier for you.

1.) Think of a basic storyline or prompt. Like, “Man is dying and is going to a mountain to see it before he dies and meets his DESTINY???” it can be stupid. It can be silly or vague so long as you have something to start with.

2.) Think of the protagonist, as well as a bit of the timeframe or universe. Are they human? Alien? Medieval? Elf? For our example here lets say its a medieval man from a heavily forested area. He is a lumberjack who hates potatoes and his old man told him stories of the mountain in the west that holds a magic temple; only the pure of heart may enter. He is dying, and wants to see this mythical place before he passes. Draw a few examples. You’ll want some basic refs to look back on.

3.)Think of the antagonist. It can be nature, machine, man, elderich horrors, etc….(typical story tropes are something like man vs. machine or man vs. nature). For our case lets say its mainly man and nature. Bandits, bad weather, illness, etc…DRAW SOME OF THOSE REFS. These beginning ones don’t have to be in depth. just basic stuff.

4.)Hash out what you want to happen in the BEGINNING, MIDDLE and END. These are kind of the most important parts. Its definitely important to think of the end ahead of time instead of thinking about it when you’re halfway through; thats a quick way to never end it at all. Our lumberjack begins his journey selling all he owns and getting a horse to set out to the mountains with nothing but a bit of gold, an old axe and a sick ride.  In the middle he encounters various trials that test his “pure of heart”-ness. Probably three, they can be as long as you want so long as they are generally even alongside each other. (3 or 7 are magic numbers WINK). In the end he reaches the temple and is welcomed inside due to his good deeds and it was allllll along a metaphor for the journey to the afterlife.

5.)get some good references. You have a time period set, a scene in mind, and some tools. Gathering from our example, we’re going to want; various forest scenes of pines, plains, dirt roads, medieval towns, mountains, temples, animals, people, cultures, etc. We need refs for our horse, axe, and gold. Remember those quick refs of characters you made in steps one and two? Now is the time to finalize those. They’ll have developed with the level of detail in your story. Add background nonsense no one else will notice but will enliven the story like how our axeman always ties his beard when mad or how he prefers apple cider over beer anyday. Give those fuckers some names. Bandit Bill challenges Axeman Abel for his horse and loses his head (literallly???)

–if you can go to like, museums or lectures or fairs about these things and take notes. USE YOUR RESOURCES!! ASK QUESTIONS!!! (For ilulatte I visited a couple of coffeeshops and roughed out some cafe drawings haha)

7.) Separate events into chapters. Generally theres a prologue, chapters 1-whatever, the end, and an epilogue. Our axeman has a prologue of starting out on the road, chapters 1-3 depicting pure-heart-trials, climax/end of reaching the temple, and an epilogue of someone else starting their journey to the temple based on his influence on the world because this shit is cyclical, baby. 

6.) make a fuckton of thumbnail drafts. You know these characters now; you built em out of your own head. You know how they move and talk, so slap down their journey in tiny pages. add minor details to the sides. (Here’s a shitty example of mine from ilulatte!!!!!)

7.) finish allllll of them. or at least the first few chapters. Its good for you I promise. You’ll notice the pacing much better this way! You can add a bunch of extra details in the margins like extra panels and bg notes. Don’t be afraid to experiment with the direction of your story, but try to keep the overall plot the same! (sticky notes are great for this!)

8.) start roughing out the actual pages. You’ll change things from the thumbnails (like I always do haha); thats okay!!! They’re more of a helpful guide than solid stone rules.  It’s like making the scaffolding to make the base for the rest of the building.

9.) do the lineart, bgs, text, etc. There’s tons of helpful art programs for this like CLIP studio paint or medibang if you’re doing it digitally. Remember those refs you collected for our horse, axe, and bgs? Now is the time to use em. BE VIGILANT. Keep copies of the originals. Go back frequently to look for mistakes or missing details. Keep a check list. Freckles? check. Scar on nose? check. shading???? UHHHHHH—-SHIT.

10.)you should probably number the pages. keep em in a nice sized resolution if you want to print but lower it if you’re posting to the internet to dissuade reposters. keep em all in one organized folder if possible. Slap your signature on em for extra safety.

11.) ????? Sell it on gumroad idk.

GENERAL TIPS:

-start with short stories. Build your own stamina.

-have relatable characters with flaws. Tumblr seems to hate “problematic” characters but thats literally the point of character building and narratives. THEY’RE RELATABLE IF THEY’RE FLAWED. If a story doesn’t have characters that conflict with each other its a boring one. Axeman Abel wants to help everyone; Bandit Bill wants to help himself only. LET THEM HATE EACH OTHER.

-its also good to have characters that are friends but still conflict with each other. The Dragon Age series is phenomenal with this (their characters are good in general, take notes!!)

-theres a lot of shitty people out there. USE THEM. (seriously though examine other peoples interactions and you’ll make better characters. )

-bad things happen to good people. Bad things also happen to bad people. Bad things just sort of happen. Don’t shy away from unfortunate events; your story will fall flat without conflict both planned and random.

-Obviously you don’t have to share the same world views as your characters. (dont let the antis fool you.) Axeman Abel can hate broccoli but you can still enjoy it. Bandit Bill can be a racist piece of shit but that doesn’t mean you are.

-have characters of various personality, body type, race, height, etc….it really livens up the story.

-generally you don’t want the bg to overwhelm the characters, so most people do a sort of painterly bg against the solid outlines of the characters but thats all really up to you and how in-depth you want it to be.

-you should also make a regular schedule, if you can. Say, something like “twenty finished pages a month” or “four pages a week” depending on the level of detail. Simplistic style and palettes of course take less time to make than full color/heavily detailed pages, so plan accordingly to prevent burnout. If you post weekly, having a few pages done ahead of time will be good in case you need an emergency break.

-be open to critique but don’t be a doormat, either. ESPECIALLY if you’re doing it for free. People will try to take advantage of you; don’t let them. Block them and move on.

-above all; BE DEDICATED. Comics take a great deal of time by yourself, but doing them helps you develop important skills in the end like time management and general technical know-how like digital programs and writing. It’s not just art, though that’s a major part of it.

-probably should’ve said this earlier but make what you enjoy??? People can generally tell if you dont enjoy your own work. There’s less effort there. 

THIS WAS REALLY LONG SO I HOPE IT WAS HELPFUL IN SOME WAY ILU HAVE FUN BE SAFE OUT THERE <3

Fic Rec Day - Pokémon and Pokémon Special

I reblogged that fic recommendation list yesterday, and, hey… it can get quite difficult to get readers. While most of the stories on this list are going to be relatively well known in their respective fandoms for that specific pairing, I will try to get a few not-so-well-known stories on the list as well.

Not written in any particular order. No major spoilers in terms of plot (but I will talk slightly about the general idea of the story to allow you to gauge whether or not you would want to read said story).

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anonymous asked:

I just realized that you wrote my favorite McHanzo story! Deity is so sweet! Any plans on expanding it? It's one of the few stories I've found that had great characterization and was so fluffy and pure (and Hanzo was so kind with Jesse!!!) Also, any other McHanzo stories in the works? Do you have any McHanzo fic recs (I trust your judgement). Thank you!

Aw, thank you! I really enjoyed writing Deity. I noticed a disturbing lack of stories in which Hanzo and McCree have a healthy, loving relationship, so that was the main inspiration behind Deity (that and I promised my dear pal @melissaknowsthings I would write her some McHanzo). As for expanding, I’ m not sure. It didn’t get much foot traffic and it feels weird to invest a lot of time into something no one really read in the first place. Anyone interested can read Deity here. 

I do have another McHanzo story in the works! It’s a slow burn long ass one though that is completely inspired from an idea I shoved down poor @exmachinus throat a while back. Basic plot: “When McCree joined up with Deadlock, he knew he was going to be testing his morals and riding the line between right and wrong. He knew they thieved and murdered. He didn’t know they were a coven and that if he didn’t accept their offer to turn, they’d suck him dry and leave his body to rot.”

As for fic recs, I have a few!…if you want ABO recs send me a DM and I’ll hook you up.

hot oil spit by my dear friend @faorism is amazing! It’s a slow burn soulmate AU with oodles of Jesse backstory and I love it. It’s still ongoing so tag along for the ride! 

He was always a wuss, but now he’s a wuss with a gun and a twisting dragon that his soulmark has burned haunting, frightening, impossible into his hand and wrist.

Ghost Stories on Route 66 by @solivar is wonderful if you’re a big Stranger Things or X-Files fan like me. I sent the teaser post, back before it was a full story, to my pals mentioned above, and they are hooked! And now I suggest it to all McHanzo fans because it’s so good! It is full of supernatural goodness and is ongoing.

Hanzo Shimada is an expatriate student of the Fine Arts, attending college in what he assumes to be a reasonably sedate corner of the American southwest. Jesse McCree is an occasionally leather-clad NPS ranger whose duties extend somewhat further than shooing lost tourists back onto the clearly marked hiking trails. Something weird is going on in the desert south of Santa Fe and their lives unexpectedly come together in the middle of it.

In Resounding Silence by Raepocalypse is one of the best stories out there. It’s a completed soulmate AU in which the first words your soulmate is meant to say to you are etched on your skin. It is angsty but god is it worth it because it’s such a  good story. 

“Well now, aren’t you the handsomest man who ever did try to kill me?” 

The words of a soulmate were always determinate. They dictated a large part of each person’s life. Hanzo had always been unfortunate enough to know that his soulmate will die by his hand. He is a Shimada assassin and they do not try.

If he’s wrong, though, what is he supposed to say back?

Points on a Circle by @aughtpunk is one of the best McHanzo fics out there. There’s one chapter to go and then the story will be completed, and it is well worth a read! 

It began when Jesse McCree summoned one of Hanzo’s dragons in the middle of battle.

It began a month ago when Hanzo looked at Jesse and realized he’s already in love.

It began an hour ago when Satya heard the word ‘magic’ and refused the believe.

It began six months ago when Genji introduced his his brother to Jesse, not knowing the two of them have a past.

It begins.

Waiting for Rain in a Desert Storm by @mermaidroru is so tragic and beautiful all in the same breath and I sobbed reading it. It is angst heavy, but it does have a happy ending. It also features single father!Hanzo which is something I didn’t know I needed until I read this fic. It’s a soulmate AU that features flower markings and that is so KEY to the story. 

Upon reaching adolescence, flowers will appear on an individual’s hands, one half blooming the other still budding. As they near their soulmates, the blossoms will bloom, but for those whose love goes unrequited…The flowers begin to wither and take their host with them unless treated.

Making Memories, Wasting Wishes by Jeannyboy is a completed AU in which McCree and Hanzo meet and fall in love when Hanzo is a patient in a hospital in Texas. There is a TON of tooth-rotting fluff and also an infinite amount of heart-wrenching angst and it is all so glorious. It does have a happy ending, but it takes a while to get there. 

Hanzo wakes up with no memory as to who he is or why he is in a hospital missing his legs.

This is a story about how a cowboy that plays guitar for hospitalized children falls in love with a nameless amnesiac and they create a life together.

Blade Runner 2049

Ridley Scott’s 1982 sci-fi classic Blade Runner has been considered by all to be a one of the greatest films ever put to screen. The film follows Rick Deckard, played by Harrison Ford, a retired police officer (Blade Runner) living in futuristic Los Angeles 2019. Deckard is called in once again to “retire” a group of rogue replicants, led by Roy Batty (Rutger Hauer), who have escaped their slave labor from the Off- World colonies. Through the film Deckard meets Rachael (Sean Young), a replicant who is unaware of what she is, who shows Deckard another side to replicants that causes him to question his mission.

When first released Blade Runner was a critical and box office bomb, but over time it has been heralded as a masterpiece, a true indication of a film being way ahead of its time.  As a film student it almost sounds cliché to love this film and call it a masterpiece because it is such a flawed film. There currently exist seven different versions of Blade Runner which is why the film has been so divisive over the years. The final cut released in 2007 was what changed the minds of critics and audience members everywhere. The removal of the voice over and the “happy ending” and the inclusion of the unicorn scene have formed the work of art we witness today.

As far as my thoughts on Blade Runner, well, you just read them. I saw Blade Runner (the director’s cut) during some time in middle school, old enough to understand but not wise enough to get it. When I first saw it I really enjoyed it mostly because I love Harrison Ford and will watch just about anything he’s in. I’ve always had an adoration to science fiction as well; so on my first viewing I already called it a masterpiece, visually. I never understood the subtext and why it was truly regarded as a masterpiece until I saw the final cut. This version allowed for a cleaner way to tell the story and present the age old question: Is Deckard a replicant? After watching that version I have been obsessed with this film; I own every version of Blade Runner, even though I only watch the final cut, I read countless articles almost daily about the themes and various techniques presented in Blade Runner, and even my senior sweatshirt has the nickname “BLADE RUNNER” printed on the back. I hate being asked what my favorite film is and I always respond with “I haven’t experienced enough film to have a favorite” but if I honestly had to choose my answer would probably have to be Blade Runner. It always seemed like the perfect film that should not be touched to be remade or have a sequel… until now.

In 2015 a sequel was announced setting the film thirty years later with Ridley Scott set to produce and Harrison Ford planned to appear in the film as well. When the story broke my first thoughts were instant anger. I’ve never been fond of remaking a film or giving an older film an unwanted sequel; Zoolander 2, Independence Day: Resurgence, because it somewhat taints whatever magic the first one had. I genuinely had the fear that Blade Runner was going to be ruined. I told others that if this movie is bad I will cry in the theaters because the disappointment would have been too much to be angry about. Later on there were announcements of cast members, writers and a director; Denis Villeneuve, Ryan Gosling, Harrison Ford, Robin Wright, Jared Leto, original writer Hampton Fancher! Even with all this I was not fully persuaded to the idea of a Blade Runner sequel. And then the first teaser trailer dropped. December 19, 2016 I was waiting in the car of a mall parking lot and I get the notification on my phone and watch the trailer half excited. After a minute and a half I put my phone down in silence and tears star welling up in my face. I find myself crying in a mall parking lot. It’s not because I’m appalled by the trailer but rather in awe of its beauty, thanks to cinematography by the great Roger Deakins. From that moment all I knew was that I wanted October 2017 to get here faster, I was hooked. This was my most anticipated film of 2017.

Jump forward to today, October 8, 2017, Blade Runner 2049. I was unable to see it opening night which is what I typically do for most films I’m excited about. I usually see movies with my dad and he was busy working to go with me for those first two days. I get antsy when I can’t see a film the day it comes out mostly because of potential spoilers but also because I love the feeling of seeing a film on the first day before most. I go in watching it on the biggest screen my local theater has and I’m trying to hide my excitement just in case I am disappointed, but at this point what is there that can disappoint me? After two hours and forty- three minutes I walk out, come back home and silently enter my room where I burst into tears. I look like I had just lost a family member; my face is drenched with tears and wet with mucus it’s almost embarrassing what I looked like. But I’m crying not because I was disappointed, but because I was moved, I was astonished, I was happy. There has finally been a sequel in my lifetime that holds a candle to the original while also being its own thing. It took me a good while to type this up because it was too hard for me to collect my thoughts and write this. I ‘m honestly crying at this very moment because this film lived up to my expectations and then surpassed those expectations. This film is the definition of art. My eyes take in every frame like a fine dish at a high end restaurant, I savor every moment never feeling bored. My ears respond to this beautiful score by Hans Zimmer in collaboration with Benjamin Wallfisch (It 2017) and pick up on callbacks to the original and causes my heart of soar because I adore Vangelis’ work on the original. This is Ryan Gosling’s best work as Agent K on the hunt for this undiscovered truth. I honestly have said too much by saying nothing at all and I wish I could pour my thoughts on this page but I couldn’t bear spoiling this for anyone. All you need to know is that this is truly a masterpiece that is worth the most expensive IMAX tickets and I would go out of my way to say, as I bite my tongue, that Blade Runner 2049 is better than its predecessor. 10/10.

cillpiines  asked:

Do you have any Be More Chill fic recommendations?

Ooh. ooOOOOHHH YOU’VE OPENED A CAN OF WORMS

So, uh, just a warning - some of these are spoilers for the musical, so if you haven’t heard the whole thing already, I suggest you do so! You can hear it and follow along with this vid

And double warning! Most of these… ok, ALL of them have boyf riends in them, along with other pairings, because I’m a hopeless romantic. Hope you don’t mind.

(Putting this under read more because WOW it got long)

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