also i feel like i know the entire plot of this movie now

⇁ tessellate | 01

Originally posted by bangtannoonas

sequel to nudes, not flowers with more angst and more filth

pairing⇁Hoseok x Reader x Jungkook

genre⇁smut, slight angst || fuckboi!au

warnings⇁public indecency, cumplay, exhibitionism, rough sex, dom/sub undertones, dom!junghope, jealousy, mentions of infidelity, sex in front of a mirror, oh n light daddy kink 

word count⇁15k

“ Triangles are my favorite shape
Three points where two lines meet.” (tessellate)

Triangles are supposed to be the strongest and most stable of all geometric shapes. You wonder how true this statement is if applied to real life situations. The way you see it: triangles aren’t a reliable structure for relationships, especially if the parties you’re involved with find commitment to be a foreign concept. 

or : a fuckboy’s guide to polyamory 

start | 01

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Book Rec List

I’m bored, home alone, and packing all my books. So here, have a list of book recommendations from yours truly!

Fantasy

  • Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbit
    • A young girl meets a family that gained eternal life after drinking from an enchanted spring, and is left to wonder whether living forever is a blessing or a curse. It’s a fantastic book that hurts your heart in 139 pages.
  • Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo
    • Six morally horrible people plan an impossible heist for selfish motivations. But the romances between the morally horrible people are somehow still very pure and wonderful. The plot also keeps you on the edge of your seat because you never have all of the information until the last possible second. And if you love fantasy worlds that include POC main characters and LGBTQ representation, this is the duology for you!
  • The Last Dragonlord by Joanne Bertin
    • Human/dragon shapeshifter romance with political intrigue. And really fun worldbuilding, too.
  • Green Rider by Kristen Britain
    • One of my favorite series. The overarching plot is wonderful, you genuinely care about all the characters, and this is one of those stories where “strong female characters” means both “well-rounded, well-developed females with agency” AND “kicks some serious ass”.
  • Artemis Fowl by Eoin Colfer
    • The protagonist is the villain. I wrote that correctly. Artemis Fowl is the villain. The entire series is about his personal journey from villain to hero, with all the beautiful and human mistakes throughout.
    • Also, it’s got fairies. With guns.
  • Dragon’s Milk by Susan Fletcher
    • A super fun (and quick-read) series about people smuggling dragons to safety in a world that is determined to destroy them. Also, lots of baby dragons. And dragons being dragons, and neither morally good nor evil. It’s wonderful.
  • Good Omens by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett
    • The funniest fucking book I’ve ever read. God’s starting the apocalypse, but they’ve somehow managed to misplace the AntiChrist. And it just gets more insane.
  • Seraphina by Rachel Hartman
    • One of my favorite books of all time. It has a fascinating new take on dragons, genuinely fun political intrigue, romances you root for but aren’t the focus of the plot, and a half-dragon heroine that you absolutely fall in love with. And, if you make it to the second book, Shadow Scales, there is massive LGBTQ representation. I’m talking gay and bi characters, I’m talking trans characters, I’m talking people asking “How may I pronoun you?” and strongly-implied polyamorous relationships. And dragons. And plot twists.
  • Castaways of the Flying Dutchman by Brian Jacques
    • When the Flying Dutchman was cursed to roam the sea forever, a boy and his dog who were on board are spared from the curse due to their pure hearts, are washed ashore and granted eternal life and youth. Now they roam the world helping people and getting into adventures. Don’t let the fun fool you, though, it’s fucking heartbreaking. They really don’t skimp on the “we’re immortal so everyone we love dies” angle, and the “wow, this kid looks like he’s seen some shit”. Also the first book feels much more YA than the other two.
  • The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster
    • I know it’s pretty much only known as middle-school assigned reading, but this book is clever, insightful, and absolutely fantastic. I definitely stood in line to get this book autographed in high school. A boy with no imagination is sent to a crazy world of unique perspectives and interesting insights to rescue Rhyme and Reason.
  • A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle
    • That book they made us all read in 5th grade that is actually all it’s cracked up to be. It’s absolutely trippy fantasy with a sci-fi edge to it, and the characters are so utterly endearing. Personally, my favorite is A Wind in the Door, but that’s book 2.
  • The Onion Girl by Charles de Lint
    • Contemporary fantasy at its absolute best. It’s modern urban fantasy that puts the fantastic in our world in such a wonderful and beautiful way. The best part is it’s also a story about dealing with physical disabilities, trauma, past abuse, self-healing, the complexity of forging and rekindling relationships with others when one is hurting, etc. Honestly, it’s just fucking awesome.
  • Dreams Underfoot by Charles de Lint
    • A book of short stories (all contemporary urban fantasy), and the best way to be introduced to Charles de Lint’s writing. So, if you want to read The Onion Girl but aren’t sure you’re ready for it yet. This is the first book I ever took a highlighter to.
  • Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson
    • Do you want to crush your heart and destroy your soul and cry like a baby in 128 pages? You’ll be happy you did.
  • Elantris by Brandon Sanderson
    • This is a standalone novel, and the best way to be introduced to Sanderson’s work. This book has phenomenal and complex worldbuilding, three-dimensional characters with agency you will fall in love with, and a book-long mystery that just blows you away when you figure out the answer. If you enjoy this book, you have to read Mistborn next.
  • Mistborn by Brandon Sanderson
    • Elantris on steroids. This is, without a doubt, the most fascinating worldbuilding I have ever encountered in literature. It’s so complicated, but completely logical, and the plot is so bewitching. And Sanderson can leave you as many clues as he wants - he will still blow your fucking mind when all the pieces come together at the end. The book takes a while to pick up the pace, but I swear to you it’s worth it.
  • Dealing with Dragons by Patricia Wrede
    • A princess gets bored, and decides to volunteer to be a dragon’s captive. Then she gets into a ton of adventures and ends up discovering a plot to overthrow the dragon government. It’s a lighthearted, quick and fun read, and Cimorene is my fucking hero.

Classics

  • Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
    • Oh God, read Pride and Prejudice. It’s my absolute favorite book.
  • Les Miserables by Victor Hugo
    • If you can, read the abridged copy. It’s kind of hard to find, so look for the one that was translated by Charles Wilbour and abridged by Paul Bénichou. It’s all the meat of the story and barely a third of the size.
  • Phantom of the Opera by Gaston Leroux
    • I mostly like it because it’s written from the rather limiting perspective of Raoul, which means you’re in the dark about the goings-on of the book until someone bothers to tell Raoul what’s happening. It’s actually a lot of fun.
  • Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier
    • A grim mystery wrapped up like a romance, where the second Mrs. de Winter is trying to discover what truly happened to her husband’s first wife. It’s by the woman who wrote The Birds (which you may know as the famous Hitchcock movie), if that clues you in to the vibe of the book.

  • I don’t really have enough classics on this list
The “Misdirection” Wars

Why the “GA” or “Surface” Interpretation Totally Gives you the Red-Herrings

For two days now I’ve been seeing way too many people crying “misdirect” at, well, the entire trailer. Which is frankly silly because I’ve no doubt that he THEATRICAL TRAILER = exactly what the movie is going to be about. That doesn’t mean there aren’t red-herrings ala Jedi Finn from the TFA trailer, the only red-herring I remember. The TFA trailer was pretty straight-forward in introducing the main players (”I’m no one” Rey, “I was raised to do one thing” Finn and “I’ll finish what you started” Kylo) and giving you a feeling of what the movie was going to be, but I digress…

There are a few red-herrings in the trailer for TLJ, they just aren’t what everybody’s up-in-arms about all over the internet. The GA got two big things from the trailer: Kylo is going to kill Leia and Rey is going to join or at the very least be tempted by the dark side. That’s the surface interpretation and it’s absolutely what Lucasfilm intended people who were only going to watch the trailer once and haven’t been obsessing over this shit for two years to take from it, amirite?

Red-Herring # 1: Kylo Is Going to Kill Mommy

They used a combination of Han’s murder in TFA and Carrie’s tragic and untimely passing as a means of suggesting that Kylo kills Leia because we all know Kylo already did it once and Carrie/Leia won’t be in IX. That said, for us spoiler-fiends there are a whole slew of reasons why we already know that he totally isn’t going to kill his mom, most notably the fact that he has his Act I stitches and Leia survives into Act III on Craft. But, that said, on a one-time viewing the trailer totally gives the surface impression that Kylo’s going to pull that trigger (he did kill daddy, right)? That’s the red-herring, the surface interpretation is that Kylo is going to shoot her while the clip is actually about outlining his internal struggle and really ins’t about Leia dying at all. It’s introducing what is going to be one of Kylo’s major plot-points in TLJ: the struggle, once again, to jump of the self-destructive “kill the past” path and take on a new goal.

Red-Herring # 2: The Infamous Hand

This is the big one, no doubt. Why people are so fixated on discounting it is a totally different story, but either way the surface-read is that Rey is going to go off with Kylo and join the dark side. This time around they’re playing with Empire expectations like Vader’s request that he and Luke overthrow the Emperor together, but a second watch of the trailer quickly reveals that’s not what’s happening at all. In TFA Kylo told Rey “You need a teacher, I can show you the ways of the Force”, so this bit of the trailer is not only an extension of that, it’s also a response to Rey’s line of FORESHADOWING (not misdirection) that will be heard earlier in the film, possibly around a campfire to either Luke or Chewie. Twice in this trailer she says she needs help controlling her powers and finding her way. The trailer answers at the end not with Luke’s hand, but with Kylo’s. The red-herring is that Rey is going dark, the truth is either that Kylo is reaching for the Light or the two of them, disenfranchised by their individual mentor’s inability to guide them, are trusting in each other to find a new way together.

Why TF Aren’t People Talking About This?

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The biggest thing about this trailer that people really aren’t talking about enough is Luke and Snoke’s big reveal about the core of Rey and Kylo’s relationship: they share something, something ancient and potentially very dangerous that was destined to bring them together in some manner from the get-go. The “raw power” their mentors make reference to is what fascinated Kylo about Rey in TFA and probably what encouraged his offer to help her. This reveal is without a doubt the biggest spoiler in the trailer because it outlines a dynamic that has been debated with tooth and claw for two years. The truth? They’re equals that are both harborers of “raw power” and “strength” that Kylo was either unable to control or embraced in the past, while it just awoke in Rey, and like Kylo said, “you need a teacher”.

So at the end of the day ya’ll who are focusing on the edits and calling misdirect at everything are missing the point: the surface-read of the trailer is just that, a surface-read, the same surface-read that led people to cry “Jedi Finn” just because Finn used a lightsaber. The trailer absolutely establishes the feeling of what the movie is going to be (and what the major character struggles will be), so don’t get caught up in the irrelevant details. Yes, Kylo is going to struggle and continue to be torn apart. Yes, Luke is going to be scared of Rey. Yes, Rey is going to beg the heavens for help because she won’t be able to control that shit. Yes, Finn is going to infiltrate the FO and fight Phasma. YES, Kylo is going to offer his hand to Rey a second time. We just haven’t seen the results of these character struggles yet.

anonymous asked:

How would the Karasuno boys act when they have to buy condoms from Ukai's shop, having to look their coach in the eye as they pay for them?

i laughed for like 10 minutes after reading this request i love it. i’ve been having some health issues lately and needed a good pick-me-up

if you like what i do and want to show your support, consider supporting me on ko-fi!

 - admin rachel lauren


The only way I could rationalize them willingly buying condoms from Sakanoshita–as opposed to any place else–knowing that their coach is minding the shop is that the team has some crazy bet going on and these are in the event that they are the loser of said bet. Whether or not they’re doing the do and actually need them is entirely irrelevant.

Daichi

  • He’s one of the few who don’t make it weird somehow. It’s just another transaction, right? Not to mention that Ukai’s made it clear to them that whatever they do outside of volleyball is none of his business.
  • It’s not embarrassing until he gets to the counter to pay and has a moment of internal panic that this is very awkward. But Daichi’s a master of keeping his composure while screaming internally all the while, so you’d never know.
    • It doesn’t hurt that he buys a few things he actually needs along with them. But still.

Suga

  • He tries to play dumb when they’re rung up: “Whoops, how did those get in there? Well, I guess I’ll take them anyway. Doesn’t hurt to have some, right?” Cue the forced bashful laughter.
  • It’s clear to everyone within a 5 mile radius that Suga is playing this up too much. Like it’s painful to watch.
  • Once out of the shop, Suga will show no mercy and pelt either the first person who laughs or the person who suggested the bet in the first place with the box.

Asahi

  • He has to buy at least four or five other things along with them in hopes that Ukai doesn’t give the condoms a second thought.
  • Except he kind of just grabs whatever is within arm’s reach in a tizzy without paying attention, so it’s an interesting mix of things.
  • He forgets how to breathe when Ukai rings his things up. You’d think that having his coach be unfazed by all of this would make it less embarrassing, but the contrast in their demeanors makes it worse. 
    • You can bet his s/o will be the one to buy them from now on because he’s scarred for life.

Nishinoya

  • Slams the box down on the counter and looks Ukai straight in the eyes. It’s the only thing he’s buying.
  • Noya’s got a dead serious look on his face the whole time. Coupled with the fact that he’s standing in a power pose, it makes the transaction feel more like a battle of wills than a simple interaction between a shopkeeper/coach and his customer/pupil.
  • Seriously, Ukai is unnerved by this until Noya shouts out a thanks and bows deeply before leaving the shop, and hearing Tanaka’s cry of “Noya-san is so cool!!!” from outside.

Tanaka

  • Tries the nonchalant whistling thing, which makes the whole process more suspect and embarrassing.
  • “They’re for my sister’s…. boyfriend…”
    • He doesn’t know why he went with that excuse. Even if Saeko had a boyfriend, neither of them would bother having Tanaka buy a box for them.
  • Ukai’s, “Good for them, I guess?” does nothing to alleviate any of Tanaka’s embarrassment.

Ennoshita

  • If it’s questioned, he has his excuse of “A prop for the new movie” all ready to go. Although, he’s also worried that unless he can make up a plot for this movie that doesn’t exist (yet), it might be considered a cause for concern that his movies are getting too adult for high school students to be in charge of.
  • Takes five minutes to come up with an elevator pitch just in case before he has to go in.
  • Ukai doesn’t even ask or indicate that he’s buying condoms and Ennoshita–red-faced and stuttering–goes on about some Seth Rogen-esque stoner comedy that he’s working on.
    • “Well, just don’t get in trouble filming something like that. You’re still a kid, after all.”

Narita

  • Can’t stop dropping his change, which is the perfect excuse to physically hide how ridiculous he feels.
  • The transaction from then on can be described as swift, as in the second Ukai hands him the bag Narita takes it and heads for the door with a, “Hm thanks coach see you tomorrow bye!” It’s all in one fluid motion and yes, that goodbye is punctuation-less .
  • Just…never bring this up again. He’d rather forget the whole thing.

Kinoshita

  • He can’t go in alone. He has to do this with at least one other person going into the shop with him, and Noya is the only one who also isn’t embarrassed by this in any way. The other second-years are embarrassed by proximity, so-to-speak.
    • Except Noya gets distracted trying to find his usual ice cream flavor, so Kinoshita has to ride solo at the counter.
  • It’s clear he’s nervous about the whole thing; his whole body is stiff and he reacts to anything Ukai says as if the man is correcting his technique during practice.
  • He does have to keep his eyes on his wallet and money most of the transaction because there’s no one he can look his coach in the eye while buying them.

Kageyama

  • He knows he’s not smart and that everyone knows this as well, so he decides to tackle this issue by using this to advantage.
  • Except he anticipates Ukai will say anything in the first place, and blurts something out totally unprompted..
    • Ukai: “That’ll be–”
    • Kageyama: What do you mean those aren’t water balloons?
  • The following is the most tense five seconds of silence you’ll ever see between these two.
  • He’s so red that Ukai is worried that Kageyama’s head might explode. Or he passes out on the spot, especially because he stops breathing.

Hinata

  • He thinks he can play it cool, but it’s like watching a trainwreck.
  • He suddenly can’t hear anything. There’s so much blood rushing to his head that he can only hear that in his ears. Ukai tells him how much he owes and Hinata keeps repeating, “What?” each time it happens.
    • “Just… take them, alright, Hinata?”
  • Once he leaves the store, his face seems to be stuck in a smile and he doesn’t react to anything anyone says or does to him. His soul has left his body. He’s straight-up astral projecting in front of the vending machines outside the shop. Never make him do that again.

Tsukishima

  • Like Daichi, he also is does not make it weird. The glare from his glasses absolutely helps to hide anything his eyes might give away about feeling like an idiot the whole time.
  • But you could replace the condoms with any other item in the store and everything would be exactly the same about this interaction.
  • The rest of the team is mad because there was no point of having the loser of their bet do that if the loser wasn’t affected by it.
    • But this eventually backfires on Tsukki because guess who Noya and Tanaka have now playfully dubbed, “The Condom King.” He hates it.

Yamaguchi

  • He’s a blend of Suga and Kageyama in this situation: “I thought they were rubber gloves! What? T-those aren’t mine!” (Which one is it, Yams?)
  • Things get worse because the barcode scanner just won’t scan this box and every second feels ten times longer than it actually is during this.
  • At this point he’s just praying that no one else–sans the rest of the boys–has to bear witness to this. If Yachi walked in and saw, he’d probably die.
Thoughts on The Emoji Movie

           It came as no surprise to me, or anyone else, that The Emoji Movie was a disastrous train-wreck of a movie with no redeeming qualities whatsoever. From the moment it was announced, The Emoji Movie was a joke, little more than a punchline of what corporate Hollywood would make just to pander to a younger audience. Yet, by creating the shoddy garbage pile of a “film” (I use this term sparingly) that is The Emoji Movie, Hollywood has done something incredible—they have killed art.

PART ONE

           The “plot” of The Emoji Movie is one that has been presented countless times before: a misfit must leave home to change himself but learns along his adventure that his true value lies in his uniqueness. In this iteration of the “finding yourself” story the hero is Gene, a socially-outcast “meh” emoji who is terrible at what he does—he has all sorts of “non-meh” feelings that he simply can’t contain. On his first day of work, he is called upon from his emoji station to be used, but he freaks out at the last minute and causes a glitch in the sending of the emoji, leading to Alex (the phone’s user) embarrassing himself in front of the girl he likes. Because of this, the smiling emoji, Smiler, who is the “big status quo boss lady” decides to kill him. Gene, however, runs away from the antivirus software and hides in the “loser emoji” section of Textopolis (the city where all the emojis live together). There he meets Hi-5, who was once a famous and well-liked emoji who got to stay in the “favorites” section of Alex’s phone, but hasn’t been used in weeks and now seeks to regain his lost fame.

           In order to reprogram Gene’s malfunction and get Hi-5 back into the favorites section, the pair leave Textopolis and go to a piracy app that Alex, a fifteen-year-old boy, has on his phone for some reason. Gene’s parents then leave after him to try and find him and Smiler sends her antivirus robot soldiers outside Textopolis to apprehend Gene. Meanwhile, in a story beat stolen straight from Wreck-It Ralph and The Lego Movie, they meet Jailbreak, a hacker emoji who serves as the purple-haired punk love interest for the movie. Jailbreak refuses to help them at first, but when she sees Gene’s ability to express multiple faces, she agrees to work together to get to “the source code” in “the cloud.” Then, the antivirus robots appear in the piracy app, (despite the fact that they were given orders to follow Gene’s parents, who are nowhere in sight) and the hero trio escape through a tunnel to Candy Crush where Gene gets trapped and they have to play the game to help him escape. This scene has absolutely no bearing on the rest of the film and is only an overblown advertisement for a phone app, which one will likely notice as a reoccurring theme in this movie.

           After escaping Candy Crush, they take a tunnel to Dance Now (available now in the app store) and they have to play the game because Hi-5 pushed a button for some reason. Here they reveal that Jailbreak can’t dance, and the dramatic stakes are heightened, except they aren’t because Gene teaches her how and then they do the “Emoji Bop” together in what I assume is supposed to be a display of self-love. But oh no! The antivirus robots show up again somehow, so our trio has to escape fast, or risk being deleted. Then, because his phone is playing Dance Now music during class, Alex deletes the app, and Hi-5 fails to escape, sending him to “the trash.”

           Naturally, because of the friendship that the three characters have cultivated together after knowing each other for two hours, Jailbreak and Gene decide to use Spotify to travel to the trash and rescue their companion. Meanwhile, Gene’s “meh” parents have had a falling out because each one blames the other for their son malfunctioning. It’s ok though, because they meet in an Instagram photo and Gene’s dad reveals that he malfunctions too, so naturally they make it all up it each other Alex also decides to delete his entire phone because it sent the wrong emoji one time and made noises on its own. Gene and Jailbreak then save Hi-5 from the trash and they’re chased by a bigger, badder antivirus that follows them until they get to Dropbox, where it can’t get them for some reason.

           They then have to upload themselves to the cloud, and each character uses their own talents to get past the firewall. At this point the movie realizes it makes no sense and in a series of nonsensical rapid-fire events proceed as follows: Gene professes his love to Jailbreak, who it turns out is actually a princess emoji, Jailbreak denies him because of a throwaway line earlier in the movie about her being an empowered woman, the antivirus appears somehow and takes Gene back to Textopolis so he can die in front of the other emojis, Jailbreak and Hi-5 fly back on the Twitter bird to rescue him, Alex begins to delete his phone but chooses not to when Gene sends himself to Addie and she responds with “that was a cool emoji” (verbatim), Smiler is crushed by a giant robot, the emojis have a dance party, and everyone lives happily ever after.

           Watching the shoddy piece of work The Emoji Movie calls a story, I felt my head spinning with questions—not just regarding the plot holes and contrivances, but to the world itself. How do emojis reproduce? If emojis age in years, as is stated in the movie, how could any emoji be older than the amount of time Alex has had his phone? What if an emoji isn’t at the station when it is called upon? How does time flow in the phone as opposed to outside of it? Are all the emojis that marry the same emojis incestuous? Why do some emojis have names like “Gene” while others are simply called by their appearances, like Hi-5? Why is the Christmas tree shown in public in the first scene but then shown in the loser lounge two scenes later? How do the emojis know the history of their app? Why do actions in some apps affect Alex’s phone while actions in other apps do not? How to the antiviruses find Gene and his crew over and over again? Why didn’t Smiler send any antiviruses after Jailbreak when she first left Textopolis? Why does Alex try to delete his phone after sending one incorrect emoji and having it make noise in class twice? How does the illegal antivirus get into Dropbox? How did Smiler get the illegal antivirus? Why did Smiler feel the need to kill Gene in front of the other emoji? Why did Smiler feel a need to kill Gene in the first place? Why does the girl on the Dance Now app ignore jailbreak messing up after the second time? How do all the emojis come back from deletion? If the trash is emptied out daily why is an email from weeks ago still in there? And, most importantly, why did I choose to watch this movie. The Emoji Movie does not answer these question, because it doesn’t care.

           The Emoji Movie doesn’t care about its story, its congruity, or the specifics of its world, because none of it matters. The story beats, directly stolen from other, better, movies, are still in place, and none of the specifics beyond set up for this formulaic and unoriginal wholesale feel-good message have any relevance to the story. The pink-haired rogue stolen straight from The Lego Movie has no personality beyond what the plot demands, and the same can be said for almost any of the other characters. Gene, or, discount Wreck-It Ralph, has the defining personality trait of “feeling things” and his story arc leads to him “feeling more things” and Hi-5’s slightly more defined emotional journey leads from him wanting fame to wanting friends. All the other characters in the story are even less one-dimensional, somehow, with personality traits that are all literally written into their very names and appearances.

           But ultimately, these characters are simply set pieces. There is no investment in the world of the emojis, no feeling when the entire phone is deleted. Half the scenes in the movie are just cash cow product placement filler, and it becomes clear when one realizes halfway through the movie that none of the adventures they have seem to matter, even within the context of their own story. When the characters themselves seem to realize that their journey is pointless, it becomes impossible for an audience to care about or interact meaningfully with the film that they’re viewing, and the best that any viewer can conjure is a “meh.”

PART TWO

           The story of The Emoji Movie is a clear cash grab, and rivetingly unengaging in its poor execution, but more lies beneath the surface. The morals that The Emoji Movie tries to impart to its audience are well-intentioned (as any moral is), but also inherently flawed, and violently mangled in every scene where they are introduced. Indeed, the heaping dumpster fire of a film that titles itself The Emoji Movie exists on multiple levels of terribleness, not using poor storytelling techniques, but imparting poor morals through these techniques as well. It often contradicts itself, falling flat on its face and hopelessly bumbling between individualistic self-love and a quite utilitarian doctrine—almost impressive.

           The Emoji Movie has all the markings of a summer Hollywood “live your true self” movie at its beginning. The main character has a specific, boring role that he is expected to serve unquestioningly, and is made a pariah for breaking from this role. His sidekick also rebels against the system in his own right, trying to cheat his way back into a position of power. By focusing on these two, the story accentuates the flaws with the emoji system and how it emotionally damages those who are forced to suffer under it. Even the villain, Smiler, is affected in her own right—he constant need to maintain happiness seems to have driven her to a place of near insanity. In the opening monologue (a completely different problem), Gene points this out this flaw to the audience by noting how the laughing and crying emojis can never break their character and the viewers begin to see the thriving city of Textopolis as a flawed dystopia. However, after the first scene, little attention is given to these flaws, instead focusing on Smiler herself as a villain. The plight of the “loser emojis” (emojis that don’t ever get used) is also fantastically mishandled. They are only seen twice in the movie and the second time is in a post credit scene where they remain in their basement, unaffected by the event of the entire movie. After sitting through an entire movie with the message that we should be ourselves instead of acting how society tells us to, we see that by nature, some people will (or must) always be excluded from the metaphorical “emoji dance party” for being themselves. The “self” that The Emoji Movie pushes is not just a best self, but also a “most useful” self.

           This is expanded upon in Gene’s journey, where he goes from being a hyperactive “meh” emoji to (briefly) being a good “meh” emoji to finally learning to use his true power as a multi-faceted expression emoji. In the stages before he discovered his true potential, Gene was outcast by his peers—and any viewer could argue that this was rightfully so. Gene broke the emoji picking device and injured dozens of emojis in the process of his one mistake and possibly endangered the safety of the entire phone. Gene then realizes his mistake and goes off to “fix” himself, only to come back stronger and more useful than ever. As is the case in many stories, Gene is accepted only after his usefulness becomes apparent, and the villain is revealed as a bloodthirsty authoritarian rather than the level-headed leader the denizens of Textopolis cited her as being. All is forgiven for Gene and the emojis are given a world where they can serve their own purpose to society, whatever that purpose might be.

           Utilitarian theory is nothing new, and it has both its merits and its flaws, but the type of utilitarianism presented in The Emoji Movie is inherently flawed, as it places Gene’s happiness above the well-being of the collective for the majority of the movie. The ending in itself is also serves as a perfect propaganda point for the utilitarian theory that it begins to uphold later on. Gene obtains happiness when he is most useful to the group collective—and thus, happiness becomes associated with utility to the group. Instead of positing that happiness can be found through the self, or that the self can and should be used to help others, The Emoji Movie combines the two, raising the idea that true bliss can only be achieved when your “self” is given to others.

           Ultimately, this idea is an idea that I disagree with. Whether or not you choose to side with me is up to you, but, speaking objectively, the romanticizing of self-sacrifice is an idea that has tangible harm on audiences who are fed it without question. Modern Japan, for instance, continued to have problems with high suicide rates due to the presentation of hara-kiri, or suicide by sword as “altruistic” in many historical texts (Suicide in 20th Century Japan, 150). This is not to say that using one’s self to assist others is harmful—good deeds are the basis of a functioning society—it is simply to note that the mixed messages that The Emoji Movie gives point towards both complete discovery and complete subjugation of the self in an unhealthy and shoddy portrayal of a moral that has always been cliched at best.

           The Emoji Movie also makes the mistake of attempting to tackle “women’s issues,” despite not even passing the Bechdel Test. Throughout the movie, Jailbreak’s primary motivator is that she wants to be free to express herself however she wants, which she will obtain by reaching the cloud. The movie attempts to attach this to womanhood by attaching this to Jailbreak wanting to escape the oppressive strictures of heteropatriarchal femininity—except, in the finale, she is framed as being in the wrong for not reciprocating Gene’s feelings for her. Not just this, but the day is saved by her using her femininity and consenting to be with Gene, despite her feelings on the matter never being brought up for discussion. Despite the single throwaway line about “men getting credit for women’s work” The Emoji Movie is not pro-woman, and could easily be interpreted as the opposite of that. It defines traditional femininity as being the most useful aspect of a woman to a society and inherently ties all its female characters to something within that stricture, pushing its heteropatriarchal utilitarianist propaganda points deep into the dirt as it tries the make the point that “sensitive guys are cool too.” This is not to say that women who embrace their traditional femininity are by any means being women incorrectly—The Emoji Movie just happens to portray its women poorly, using them always as tools for the man-driven plot and never fleshing them out as characters.

           Tony Leondis offered his own interpretation of The Emoji Movie’s story, calling it a “coming-out story” which is significant, as Leondis is both the director of the movie and a gay man. If one looks from a distance and squints, the similarities between The Emoji Movie and a coming-out story can become visible. Gene is outcast for his “malfunction” as many gay teens will be. The butchering that follows this plot point is incredibly poorly done, and leads to something to utterly offensive and heterosexual to be called a “coming-out story.” First and foremost, a “coming-out story” needs to reach the very low bar of deviating from traditional heterosexuality in its story’s romantic subplots, somehow. This seems to go without saying, but the team of The Emoji Movie conveniently forgot this, instead tripling down on the action and giving the audience three heterosexual romantic subplots, those being the ones between Alex and Addie, Gene and Jailbreak, and Gene’s Mother and Father. None of these deviate at all from a traditional heterosexual romantic story, and, if anything, Gene and Jailbreak’s story enforces obligatory heterosexuality instead of contradicting it. Not only that, but the farther one goes into the plot, the less a coming out story makes sense. When Gene’s father reveals that he has the same malfunction, is he being implied to be the emoji version of “gay?” In a better movie, this could have been used as a tool to foster an emotional connection between Gene and his father, but The Emoji Movie is not that better movie, so this plot point is essentially forget after it becomes irrelevant. In the finale, Gene actually watches his parents get “erased” and can’t break out any expression except a “meh,” which is telling of how well the emoji movie establishes connections between its characters.

           The themes explored in The Emoji Movie are explore poorly at best, and offensively at worst, often taking a back seat to the far more important message of the film—the advertisements. Ultimately, the reason that The Emoji Movie does such a terrible job with its ideas is that these ideas are only borrowed plot points, there to mask the movie for what it really is—a massive commercial for phone apps. The true message of The Emoji Movie isn’t “be yourself” or even “make yourself useful” it’s “buy our product,” and everything beyond this is simply pointless fluff.

PART THREE

           It’s no secret that The Emoji Movie was a corporatist cash-grab, but it was astounding to see just how deeply that had sunk into the movie itself. The entire story is product placement after product placement, a journey to Dropbox, through Candy Crush and Dance Now,  so unabashed in its capitalism that it made me question the film industry as a whole. Where do we draw the line between business and art? At what point do we leave all hope of creativity behind and choose to instead sink into shameless cash grabs and commercials like The Emoji Movie? Then I realized, with a sinking feeling in my gut, that The Emoji Movie had indeed killed art.

           On its first day, The Emoji Movie made ten million dollars in box office sales—a fifth of what it cost to produce. Despite withering reviews and constant scorn from the demographics it seemed to be targeting, The Emoji Movie will chuckle through its entire life as a movie, because it played us all. This movie is a Frankenstein’s monster created by Hollywood, a mishmash of everything that makes money crammed into one pandering mess of a film, and I’m sure it knows this. I’m sure it knows that it looks like a dumb, out of touch, unwatchable pile of garbage, but I’m also sure that it doesn’t care about this, because it’s found a way to make money without even trying.

           The Emoji Movie probably paid for itself in the sheer amount of advertisements it crammed into its ninety minute runtime, and the young, impressionable minds watching it will all be immediately entranced by the colorful scenery of lands like Spotify and Candy Crush. Sales will go up for the sponsors, and the Hollywood capitalist fat-cats who decided that a movie should be made out of emojis will laugh all the way to their enormous Beverly Hills mansions. They knew that they could take advantage of the “car crash phenomenon” that makes people stare at things they shouldn’t, so they sent The Emoji Movie out to their theatres and made a quick buck for Sony Animation.

           But beyond this, The Emoji Movie sets a precedent. It showed that idiots like me can be drawn to this shit like moths to a light. It showed that movies do not need to have good quality, or have be art, to be marketable, and that the film industry should prioritize business and profits above all else. The Emoji Movie has proved, statistically, that quality cinema should always come second to quality advertising. The time to organize against the Hollywood capitalist is now. A boycott of terrible Sony films is the least the we can do to stop them, even though such an action would be little more than a thorn in their hide. We Must accept that our idiocy and submission to this trash is at least partially responsible for the state of film as it is in America today, and we must break free of the chains that force us into our roles as submissive cash cows.

           Good cinema does good things for those that watch it. It can be used as a tool to convey important and revolutionary ideas, or to relay important information to those that are systemically spat on by traditional education. Historically great films have caused great controversy, such as the movie adaptation of To Kill a Mockingbird which caused riots in the south upon its release. When we let film fall to business we lose a part of our cultural identity—we submit art, heritage, and storytelling as just another part of a capitalist machine.

           We have the buying power. We choose where we spend our money, and where we place our values. No longer can I sit idly in my movie seat and watch terrible movies for fun—the time for action against the greatest threat to art in the western world is now. Resist capitalism, resist the state, and resist the attack upon the most basic human freedom of expression.

Do not go gentle into that good night.

Until next time, Comrades.

-Sunshine

Spider-Man was fucking DOPE!

Man, I haven’t seen a Spider-Man movie so good for a very long time. I disliked Garfield’s version and I wasn’t really expecting much from Tom Holland, but after Civil War, my hope actually did skyrocket. And Spider-Man: Homecoming has not disappointed me. Though, it had one small minus.

Spoilers ahead, obviously.

Here’s my list of things I totally loved:

  • Bear papa Tony Stark. Seriously. A++++ character development. Tony is nothing but a sweet angel, I promise. He doesn’t steal the show either.
  • HAPPY HOGAN HONESTLY I WAS SO HAPPY TO SEE YOU!!!!!
  • They chose not to follow the boring-to-death Mary Jane/Gwen Stacy bullshit, instead they chose a NORMAL high school-like hardcore crushing/relationship. Not the big, eternal love at the age of 15. Yes, Peter was clearly having strong feelings for Liz, but it wasn’t all unnecessarily too much. They kept it totally natural and realistic. I will love them forever for that.
  • Biracial relationship, biracial marriage. Nice.
  • Many POC characters.
  • Ned is basically me the entire movie, honestly
  • Did I mention they kept it all REAL? Peter cried more than once, because he was in danger, because he was confused, because he is still a kid. Yes, he is tough, he is smart, he is strong and brave, but he is also only 15 and he is allowed to be weak and to learn out of that. I think it was really, really awesome.
  • Zero plot holes. Like, literally, none. They packed it all up nicely, addressed issues from CA:CW and Avengers both 1 and 2. I wish all the other movies and TV-show makers would do the same with their stories.
  • Karen, the suit lady and her instant-kill mode. Yup.
  • The Bank of Queen’s scene, with criminals wearing Avengers’ masks, so a casual viewier would get the “they’re seen as cirminals now” vibe. Small thing, done mostly for fun, but I like it anyways.
  • PAPA BEAR TONY STARK SERIOUSLY I WILL NOT SHUT UP ABOUT IT
  • Also, Happy mentioned the plain contained “materials for Cap’s new shield”. I think I had an orgasm just by hearing that.
  • Oh and about Cap: I can’t even imagine the amount of fun Chris Evans had by jumping into his old Captain America costume just to film those lame educational movie clips
  • Also, the amount of trolling in the post-credit scene is strong. Very strong.
  • Assholes. Seriously. And Chris Evans’ shit-eating grin when Cap said “patience” was the worst. Fuck you, sir.


Things I did not like:

- Peppers Potts. What the even fuck. Like why? Where did she pop out from? Seriously? Just ????????


EDIT:

Ok guys, I feel like I need to clarify what I meant with Pepper.

It’s not that I don’t like Pepperony, or Pepper Potts herself. I freaking love Pepper Potts (as an individual character and not a part of Pepperony ship) and if Tony can’t be with Steve, then Pepper is honestly the best choice for him. (reason I’m saying Steve would be better is because Steve is much more understanding and delicate when it comes to Tony and that’s something Tony desperately needs)(but Stony can happen only if Stucky cannot tho. Stucky #1, always).

Anyway, all I’m saying is just that she popped out of the blue and it looked like nothing happened? Judging by Tony’s face in CA:CW when he said Pepper “needed a break”, it looked like she dumped him permanently, because she disliked his lifestyle and/or was too stressed herself (and that’s totally understandable, tho). It was probably the big drama effect that was meant to contribute to Tony’s general stress, frustration, and the feeling of not being in control of his life (again). I get it now after watching Spider-Man, it actually makes sense.

I just don’t like the way they put Pepper back in the story. Like nothing happened, like Tony was never heartbroken, and they’ve been happily together since 2008. Even though I love to see Tony happy and and head over heels in love, I wish they would save it to the Avengers movie and explain what actually happened between them and how did they resolve the conflict.

Pepper Potts is a strong and smart woman, she’s definitely the Stark Industry boss material, and of course she is a human being that’s constantly put into stressful situations thanks to Tony and his identity as Iron Man. I am not saying that she should block her own feelings just to make Tony happier, but if his lifestyle is too stressful for her and she cannot accept it, maybe it would be better if they weren’t together. Not because they’re not in love, but because Tony needs someone who will stay with him no matter what. He needs this psychological and emotional stability, and I don’t think it does him any good if Pepper constantly changes her mind whether to be or not to be with him. Either she stays and accepts him, and Tony of course does everything to soothe her stress, or they split. I just don’t like the emotional roller coaster Tony is constantly put through: he deserves cuddles, soft kisses and patience. Pepper deserves psychological stability, too.

That’s why I disliked the way they put them back together: I simply cannot know how they resolved the conflict. I miss it, because I wanted to see if they’re actually doing it properly this time. If they did, then I’m totally happy for Pepper’s return too.

Knowing Him

Summary: Songfic AU. Reader struggles with new feelings and insecurities in a new relationship.

Pairing: Bucky Barnes x fem!reader

Word Count: 2,596

Warnings: language, fluff, insecurity, bagel discourse

A/N: This is for @propertyofpoeandbucky‘s writing challenge (non-disney). My prompt was the song “How Will I Know?” by the iconic Whitney Houston. It’s short and fluffy. I listened to this song so many times I need a five-year break from it, haha.

Originally posted by sebbystanimagines

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How Yosuke Hanamura broke my heart

It’s incomplete, but I had to get this out of my system:

How Yosuke Hanamura broke my heart

Persona 4 is a funny game. It is also a long game, and that allows the social simulation aspect of it to really work, allows you to feel at home with the characters, through charm and repetition - grumpy Dojima, overly energetic Chie, confused heart of gold Kanji. Through little bits of interaction, day by in-game day, you at some point start to realise that when this is over, you might actually miss them. All of them. 


And then there is Yosuke. 


You play Persona 4 as Souji, a quite detached guy moving in from the city, hand on his hip, jacket slung over his shoulder, and while you, the player, grow fond of the game’s characters, Souji always feels like he doesn’t quite belong. He is the leader, the one who pulls the strings, the one grown up far beyond their age, with the world’s weight on their shoulders. 


You juggle realtionships, help people out, they call you senpai, sensei - and then there is Yosuke. 


Yosuke, who somehow, magically, manages to transcent Persona 4’s charming but game-y relationship system and becomes something else. Yosuke, who calls you Partner, and rings you up at night asking about your dreams or which girl you like. Yosuke, who does and says so many silly things that you never quite know what to expect - Yosuke, who ultimately breaks the boundaries of Persona 4 and makes Souji/Yosuke the most unexpectedly real-feeling relationship within a video game that I’ve ever encountered. 


I don’t know what I thought when I first laid eyes on him, it’s likely that it was something along the lines of “Hey, this is quite cool-looking for an anime video game guy. Nice headphones.”


Then, in quick succession, things happened that made it clear that Yosuke was many things - heartbroken, repressed, funny, lazy, loyal, competitive, insecure, reckless - and that there was something building between him and Souji that seemed like a stunningly natural depiction of friendship. Somehow, this is rare - a video game showing two guys becoming friends, a process that just like falling in love requires making first moves, and opening up, and getting comfortable with each other. It seemed like Yosuke was the person in the cast that always wanted to know a little more, the one to push Souji a little bit, willing to ask stupid questions just to get a reaction, and unlike the other characters, he seemed to always act out of a desire to be level with Souji, to break through the calm, collected, leader-shell of his and address the human being inside. 


Now, that alone would be a remarkable thing for a video game to depict, and worthy of high praise. What complicates things is that Yosuke, no matter how much he might deny it, seems like the most obvious case of a closeted gay person the world has ever seen. 


When I started playing Persona 4, I had a pretty good idea of what I was getting myself into, through reading about it and actually having played a bit in the past. I also knew about the game’s realtionship system, and was aware, or thought I was, that you could only get romantically involved with girls. Thus, when the game started to tease the possibility of a gay option, I raised an eyebrow, then another one, and then I lost my marbles. 


When it started, the closeness between Souji and Yosuke had already been established, and since I’m a sucker for guys not actually hating each other, I started to favour Yosuke a little bit - choosing him to eat lunch with on the roof, studying together, spending afternoons at the Junes food court, talking in the soft glow of the sun on the Samegawa river bank. When Yosuke asked which girl I liked, I chose “neither”, cheekily, thinking I was playing the metagame, when the next midnight channel story twist came up, I bet each time that Yosuke would be the one to call Souji, outraged, worried, flustered, and each time when the phone rang and it was indeed him, I smiled to myself. But surely it was all in my head - I was starting to ship it, but it was just a fun little thing to do, to spare a thought here and there and layer it on top of these two characters whose interactions I enjoyed way more than expected. 


Then, these little moments started happening - the group sitting together at Junes’ and Yosuke remarking how good Partner is with his hands, a comment that might not even have stuck out so much if weren’t for the fact that immediately after saying it, Yosuke became a hot mess of backpedalling embarrassment. His insistence to know whether Souji had a crush on somebody, and who it was, despite the awkwardness. His remarks about inviting a third person to their activities, “or else people might think we’re gay.” And ultimately, the sheer time the game devoted to the Souji/Yosuke relationship - way more than any of the other characters got.


Persona 4’s social link system is fairly rigid. You choose to spend time with people, and if things go well, and even sometimes if they don’t, it raises your relationship level with said person, allowing you to climb the social link ranks, which has gameplay and combat benefits and also allows you, in some cases, to pursue a romance. What is remarkable about Yosuke is that the game spends a significant amount of time showing interactions between Yosuke and Souji outside of this system, building their relationship beyond the confines of you walking up to a person after school and answering “yes” to their proposal of hanging out. This not only serves to create a markedly more natural and complex relationship, it also sets Yosuke apart from the other characters - he is the one to choose to interact with Souji while the other characters can only wait to be chosen. 


And then Kanji entered the picture, Yosuke freaked out completely and I looked on, amazed at the fact that this game would dare to introduce a gay character, who, despite being closeted, met up with dates after school and whose dungeon was, of all things, a gay bathhouse, with sexual content that wasn’t even the slightest bit concealed. Of all the characters, Yosuke reacted most strongly to this, outright refusing to enter and making a big fuss about being afraid of Kanji taking advantage of him. 


It culminated in the camping trip - Kanji, Yosuke, Souji sharing a tent - a scenario that could have been used very easily for a gay romance movie of questionable quality, full of the usual tropes of late night talks, denial, confrontation and very real confusion on my part of where exactly this was going - the game laid on the armored gay homophobia on Yosuke so thick that it seemed almost impossible to read what was going on in any other way. Combined with the unusual qualities that had been established in the realtionship before Kanji joined the group, it started to feel like an entire plot was going on behind the scenes, inexplicit yet persistent and increasingly impossible to ignore. 


A few in-game days after that camping trip, Yosuke broke another boundary the game had set up to this point - he visited Souji’s home. More importantly, his room, a place that up until then you, the player, had always been alone in. The conversation that followed, in that intimate space, can’t adequately be described as subtext anymore, it’s text, and very gay text at that. I was streaming the game at the time, and I bet if that session’s video was still up, you’d hear my breath hitch when Yosuke, no homo Yosuke, asked about Souji’s porn stash and teasingly, suggestively stated he’d find it while Souji was out of the room. That was only the top of the iceberg, the whole scene and its context hit me like a 10 ton truck - could it be real? Was there really, explicitly something going on? The fact that I, after learning through research that there was no gay option, felt the need to double check after that scene, to make sure there wasn’t one, should speak volumes. 


That’s when I learned of the fact that Yosuke very likely was a gay option, that there were unused text and voice lines left over on the game’s disk that turned the inexplicit explicit, both in english and japanese, suggesting the developer changed their mind after the localization was done, i.e. very late in the game’s development. Only, they had ripped out very little, leaving in tons of sublte and not so subtle parts of the relationship, and that was when I realised that Persona 4, beyond being one of the best games I have ever played, would also have the potential to make me very sad, and very angry.


It wasn’t just that gay rights had been dear to my heart for as long as I could remember. It wasn’t just that the progression of Souji and Yosuke’s relationship eclipsed any other possible pairing in the lineup by miles in terms of complexity and depth and just feeling right. It was the loss of an incredible story being told, a story that would have been unique in the history of video games - the story of two fully realised, multi-faceted male characters that you, as a player, like, falling in love, and dealing with the fact that they both happen to be guys, with all the issues that might bring in a society where homophobia and hate are still so prevalent. 


While this has been done in movies to great success in recent times, mainstream video games haven’t dared to show male homosexual relationships in positive light and up front and center. Persona 4 does dare to spend significant time on very progressive subjects, including homosexuality and transgender issues, but it falters and pulls back just on the brink of being truly groundbreaking, which, to anybody playing the game with an open mind, can only scream injustice both in a worldly and in an in-game sense. 


The level 9 rank of Yosuke’s social link progression has the two of you standing on a hill overlooking the town of Inaba. Yosuke’d probably call it a village, and the two of you talk about coming to terms with your place in the world, literally and figuratively. It’s autumn, and the evening sun plays with the coloured leaves on the trees - it’s a beautiful spot, a wistful song is playing, and despite the Playstation 2’s aged graphics you can’t help but marvel a little. You’ve never been to this spot before, you think Yosuke probably brought you here, and you wonder if there are any other locations in the town you know so well by now that you haven’t seen.


“There is still nothing here,” Yosuke says, meaning Inaba, a place he resented for the longest time, “but I have family, and friends…and you.”


I sat in front of the TV for a long time, the soft piano notes of the song playing making me ache, and then I realised that while Yosuke Hanamura was denied the chance to become part of video games’ first positively framed gay male relationship, he had acomplished one thing:


Yosuke Hanamura broke my heart.

DRRR!! movie actors!AU

I’ve had this idea in my head for quite a while now ever since I watched the end of ketsu, hear me out.

Durarara!! cast as movie actors.

Introducing:

- Izaya having to constantly redo the scene cuz he keeps laughing at the lines and ‘this guy is an asshole I fucking love him’ about his character.

- Ever since Mikado got the prop gun on set which would be used in the ‘ketsu’ end, he constantly rehears his lines and use the gun as he would during the set. ‘It’s for immersion’ he tells everyone. Kida grows tired of this and swaps it with a replica but one that’s an actual water-gun. Mikado still hasn’t forgiven him.

- Because of Celty’s lack of head in the series, she constantly has to wear a greenscreen wrapped around her head during set and every now and then there’s a mysterious swapping of imagery. Instead of smoke curling around where her head is supposed to be there’s now a bowl of cereal with milk being gently poured into it.

-Shizuo is a child and you would think he’s calm and collected because of the character he’s acting, but ohno, he’s a confused lil kid who constantly forgets his lines and forgets to take out his lollipop during rehearsal which has lead to a lot of scenes being re-taken.

-Despite Shizuo being kinda clumsy and forgetful, when he’s being serious (or ‘in the mood’ as Izaya so generously put it) he leaves everyone in awe of his acting.

- Akane is a fucking angel in real life as well and she clings to Akabayashi whenever he’s not acting. She also steals a lot of Shizuo’s sweets from his bag, thinking she’s being stealthy but Shizuo knows and keeps putting more candy in that specific corner of the bag so she’ll find it easier.

-Shiki has, more than once, sat in the back of the usual prop car and made money rain whilst Lil Wayne ft Fat Joe - Make It Rain plays in the background.

- The crew has noted Izaya is terrible at catch as they had to replace Celty’s prop head to a smaller sized water melon for him to practice with because he keeps dropping and throwing the head.

- Anri loves to pose with her sword, saying she feels like Michonne from The walking dead.

- The durarara!! cast snapping pics every time Shizuo and Izaya are near each other outside of the set (eating, walking, talking etc…) and posting it to the official DRRR!! cast twitter page #whatisthis????!?!?! #shizayaisreal?!?!?

- Erika and Walker sometimes disappears from set and aren’t found for hours. Usually they can be found in a corner reading manga or their lines.

-Shizuo and Izaya are actually best friends (like their voice actors Kamiya Hiroshi & Ono Daisuke) and cannot stop teasing each other on set.

“Be a dear and don’t forget your lines this time around?”

“Maybe I’ll forget to not throw the vending machine and you’ll end up in a hospital for a change!”

“Oh wow, nice, remember that line.”

“You think? Oh thanks.”

-The term ‘break a leg’ is forbidden to say unless you want Shizuo to actually do it.

- Mikado accidentally did stab Aoba with that pen and, although Aoba insisted he was okay, Mikado could not stop crying and apologizing to him.

- Every Friday is taco Friday. They all gather at a restaurant and have a nice time together.

- Shinra actually hates the sight of blood and once fainted during the act where he’s supposed to treat Shizuos gun shot wound on his leg. Despite knowing it’s fake, he still can’t stand the thought of seeing that dark red colour on his friends.  

- Speaking of fainting, at the final confrontation with Izaya and Shizuo, neither of them could remain in character for long because of all the tension, and had to stop multiple times because of emotional stress. Shizuo, fearing he’ll actually hurt Izaya when hitting him, actually fainted after seeing the ‘in act Izaya’s face of pain’. The stress and the guilt of actually hurting his best friend was too great for him and as Izaya sat there on the floor with him, hugging him, he assured Shizuo that ‘you monster can’t hurt me, I’m Orihara fucking Izaya’. Shizuo didn’t let Izaya go for an entire hour.

Of course there’s some plot-holes and such which I can’t figure out how to solve, like their name being the same as the ‘characters’ they’re playing, but I can’t stop thinking about this AU.

I’ll prolly add more to this so stay tuned if you wish to know more. Or please come talk to me about this AU, I need to TAL K MORE DRRR.

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Character Design is an important part of any movie, but few use it to map out character design as well as Howl’s Moving Castle

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Better than Bullets

Tag LIst: (Message to be added)  @thebeautyofthomas @frustratedwaffle @killerfangirl3 @pippa-frost @extreme-doodles @fandomsofrandom @here-to-vent @i-prayed-to-you-cas @pro-fangirls-unsocial-life @justanotherpurplebutterfly @emovirgil @aikogumi @mysticalcatamount@fallingineternity @notallpotatoesarefrenchfries

Pairing: Moxiety (platonic or romantic, though intended as platonic), brief mentions of Logince (also platonic)

CW: Startled response, horror movie mention, horror movie plot mention

Categories: Fluff, humor

Notes: A quick lil’ thing before I head off on vacation. I’ll probably have time to write while I’m there but just in case I wanted to get one more quick story up. 

*

The good news was he’d gotten Virgil to agree to a movie night, just the two of them, in honor of the anxious side’s upcoming favorite holiday: Halloween. 

The better news was that Virgil was feeling so relaxed with Patton these days that, halfway through the evening, he had drifted off, curled up with his head on Patton’s shoulder and his arm draped over his waist. 

The bad news was that the nonstop Halloween specials that were currently cycling through the TV in the commons had taken a turn, and instead of the relatively benign features like Hocus Pocus and The Nightmare Before Christmas, the TV was now showing Child’s Play

And the worst news of all: the remote was out of reach, and Logan and Roman were having a bonding night of their own, immersed in strategy games and well out of earshot in Logan’s realm. 

Which mean that Patton had two choices: he could shift Virgil away from him in order to get the remote, risking waking him up and ensuring that their cuddling would be over for the night–unthinkable–or he could…could…

Watch Chucky. 

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Okay, so I’m most likely completely wrong here, BUT

The entire time while watching Howl’s Moving Castle there was this tiny detail which kept bothering me. It was just a feeling, a hunch and nothing that was ever adressed in the movie, BUT

Look at Howl’s eyes

They seemed awfully familiar, like I’ve seen eyes like that somewhere… Not sure where… Then, halfway through, I remembered:

Here,

Here,

Even here

These characters’ eyes remind me a lot of Howl’s throughout the movie because they’re designed in a similar way with similar colours. The purpose of this is to indicate that these characters are, you guessed it, blind

And that was my hunch. I’ve been getting the feeling taht Howl was blind. So I decided to try and see what was it that was giving me this feeling. And it was the way Howl looks/sees

Okay, that makes no sense, let me try to explain: I’m writing a blind character, so I’ve done and I’m doing research on blindness and amongst other things, the way blind people’s eyes “behave”, so to speak

What I mean is: since a blind person can’t see, their eyes move a lot less. Most of the time their eyes are kept on one spot, making them look like they’re gazing off into distance. Also, even if they are close to you and have their eyes on you, they still seem like they’re looking into the distance and not you. And throughout the movie that’s exactly what Howl does. It’s even seen in the screenshots above. Howl is close to Sophie but he doesn’t seem to be looking at her, he seems to be looking at… nothing

Is it just me who sees it this way??

Now, this definitely can’t count as a theory because this is all based off of a feeling I had and the fact that Howl’s eyes kinda sorta look like what drawn blind eyes look like

I have nothing to support my claim except a hunch and vague similarity

And, well, this:

Calcifer asks for something of Sophie’s, which is basically how you form a contract with a demon, if I got it all right, and he suggests her eyes

Hmm…

Before discarding my silly idea alltogether, I looked into it some more, encouraged by this line by Calcifer

And I found that all characters from this movie have differently coloured eyes. Even the blue eyed characters have more colour in their eyes than Howls, whose are kinda blue-ish

Except for the Witch of the Waste

So, maybe this is just a witch/wizard thing to have eyes like that, BUT Madame Suliman, a witch, doesn’t have eyes like that

And, if I got it all right, Howl and the Witch of the Waste are the only ones mentioned to have made a contract with a demon which is something the plot is all about, you know, giving something to the demon

Now, it is also said that Howl gave his heart to Calcifer but later we see that Howl’s heart sorta created Calcifer, so…. Did he really give it to him?

And that’s my thought. Not a theory, not something I expect to be true because there’s a lot of “if”s, but I just wanted to point this out because it’s been on my mind for a while

A-Z Book Recommendations.

What a great idea from my friend at @macrolit :) Had to give it a go. I’ve omitted “A’s” and “The’s” from most of the titles for sake of flow.

  • A - American Gods by Neil Gaiman - A wandering modern “fantasy” that felt keenly poignant to me having grown up in the midwest. You’ll need patience for this one but this book is truly about the journey not the destination.
  • B - Bloody Jack by L.A. Meyer - I’ll be honest, I never finished this series. It got a little overblown but the characters are so genuine that I held out a lot longer than I would expect of myself. This first book though is the definition of a classic middle reader. Lot of Adventure and a lovable, fierce, albeit flawed, female protagonist. 
  • C - Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess - I used to read this book every summer. It’s a rough read with some explicit violence (sexual and otherwise) but an important one I think. I recommend reading the “British” publishing which has 21 chapters (the publishers took out the last one for American audiences, because apparently we don’t like character redemption and growth *eyeroll*). The real genius of this book is the vernacular Burgess created from scratch that is truly like reading another language at first. 
  • D - Darker Shade of Magic by V.E. Schwab - Not to be cliche but I find that a lot of the titles Booklr obsesses over in the YA genre to be par-baked at best. Not the case with this series! Well developed characters that exist beyond their actions and exhibit real emotional complexity without relying on tropes and a plot that kept me turning and turning pages!

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bungledramblingsofalesbianmind  asked:

Supercorp prompt! I've always had this headcanon that if anyone asked Kara to name her favorite physical feature about herself, she would say the tiny scar on her eyebrow b/c it happened to her as a child on Krypton and it's a lasting physical reminder of the life/planet/family she used to have. She gets to look in the mirror every day and see it. I'd love to read (if you're interested in writing it!) you take on that convo with Lena...

Kara is not mysterious.

She’s not, though she makes a valiant attempt at it. She’s secretive and brilliant and more than talented at putting on an act, but she’s not mysterious. While there are dozens of things that don’t make sense about her, she has a refreshing habit of wearing her heart on her sleeve, consequences be damned, and even if Lena doesn’t understand what Kara does, she certainly can follow why.

Which is why the eyebrow thing is so…confusing.

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anonymous asked:

What's your personal limit on fight-related bullshit in books/movies/tv/etc? At what point do you put it down or turn it off? Can you tolerate the occasional flaming arrow, or...? What are your absolute turn-offs?

I’ll be honest, my limit is excessively low. I mean, I was watching Fate/Zero the other day. I love the 80s Transformer’s Movie (who doesn’t?). I watch Vikings. I genuinely love some incredibly terrible B-action movies, including G.I. Joe. (Ray Park and Byung Hyun Lee are amazing, and G.I. Joe 2 is where I discovered Elodie Yung before her stint as Elektra.) My tolerance is high. So, if I’m put off it usually isn’t the violence itself.

Here’s the three things that turn me off:

1) Not What It Says On The Tin

This is perhaps the biggest turnoff for me. When a movie, book, piece of entertainment establishes itself as A and then does B. I don’t want to sit down with a movie that bills itself as a “hyper-realistic” thriller and get The Mummy. Now, I love The Mummy, it’s a fabulous movie but it’s billed as a wild and wacky summer action flick. It’s big, goofy fun in the best way. It is not, however, a “hyper-realistic” thriller. It’s even worse when the film is trying to be a “hyper-realistic” thriller using an action style pulled from The Mummy. These two could be fantastic together, just drop the “realistic” from the description.

Basically, the piece of entertainment needs to give me what it promised or I’m taking my ball and going home.

2) Sheer Stupidity

This is the bad writing category, when a piece of entertainment is trying so hard to be serious that it doesn’t leave a justification open for balls to the wall style, throw our hands up and throw down, type action but goes there anyway.

It’s not so much that it’s dumb, it’s that the narrative is breaking its own rules and removing the possibility of consequences. Usually this is the classic “Sue” curse, but it can happen to any character in a piece of fiction. I don’t have any patience to read about a character running around knocking out everyone in a castle if there isn’t going to be a pay off for it later.

I’m not against self-congratulatory action sequences that show off how awesome a character is, I just want some narrative consistency to go with it and the scene to have a purpose beyond just that. I like cool fight scenes, but I also like to invest in the characters.

3) Fucking Around With The Audience

I don’t like being played with, tricked, or lied to by a piece of media I’m consuming. There’s a difference between a plot twist and actively fucking around with the audience. I’m not here for movies, novels, comics, or television shows that waste my time.

When the writer is more invested in tricking their audience than they are with telling a good story then that’s when I’m out. It gets worse when the plot twists are nonsensical.

Watching nonsensical fight scenes that exist to pad out a narrative after its run out of ideas is about as fun as watching a five year old slam their action figures together. Actually, the five year old slamming their action figures together is more interesting and the story behind the battle is often coherent.

4) Some In Universe Logic Is All I Want

Mortal Kombat is a very silly movie based on an arcade fighting game, but at least I know what the stakes are and what the participants want. The gratuitous battles make sense in the narrative, even when they don’t.

This is a companion piece to Fucking Around With The Audience but my brain checks out around the time the writer stops caring about justifying a character’s actions in universe. Or, acting in a way that goes against a character’s stated goals. If the character’s decision making cannot rise to the level of a 90s antagonist in a shounen anime then I don’t have time for them. I don’t need the reason for the fight to make sense to me, or to the other characters, I just need it to be in sync with the one starting the violence.

If a character has decided to take the most difficult path to success like knocking out every soldier in a building just to extract one person, then I’d really like that logic explained. Or, the plan was to jump in and save one guy from being attacked by a gang of seven so the protagonist decided to put the whole group into submission holds… one at a time.

However, if the stated goals of these characters are different then I could definitely see it happening.

Q: “Why did you beat up every soldier in that fortress?”

A: “Man, you know, I really hate those guys so I decided to fuck with them! Think about how stupid they’ll feel when they all wake up!”

I really can’t argue with that logic, you know.

Here’s the thing, a character doesn’t have to make the best choice or the right choice or the smart choice. They can be really goddamn dumb, and supported by their setting. The issue is when the writer tries to pretend the decision was brilliant, strategic, tactical, or anything else. That action was their character taking a hammer to a screw. It worked, but it wasn’t smart. For example: Son Goku is not the brightest bulb in the box, but the masses all over the world love him anyway.

All I’m asking for is this: “I wanted to prove myself the strongest fighter, but you dismissed my challenge. Now, I kidnapped your girlfriend and I’m threatening to kill her if you don’t give me what I want. Fight me in an acceptable duel of previously agreed upon terms, coward!”

That’s a character taking a hammer to a screw and watching characters take hammers to screws can be a lot of fun, when its supported by the narrative. Its a combat train wreck. There are entire genres built on it.

My issue is don’t try to lie to me. The motivations don’t need to make sense to me or be what I’d imagine doing, or act as any kind of insert, I just want the character’s motivations, desires, and combat style to make sense to them and be in sync with who they are.

After that, it’s all good.

-Michi

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Edge of Darkness

From the Marines to the Emmys to the most powerful cultural force in the galaxy, for ADAM DRIVER, finding his path has been a long, hard battle. Now, for STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI, in a role he never imagined could be so complex, the brooding face of millennial angst faces his toughest fight yet. Spoiler alert! 

British GQ, December 2017

His face shrouded beneath a hood, Adam Driver strides toward me. Shoulders hunched, fists jammed into jean pockets, he lets out a low whisper, “Hi. I’m Adam.”

The mixed messages – simultaneously worrying he’ll be recognised and that he won’t – hang in the air awkwardly as Driver surveys our spot, a near-empty New York City café. Neither fear is well-founded; there is no flock of fans to notice him and yet there is no mistaking the actor, his grey hoodie notwithstanding.

“I try to disguise things, but it just doesn’t really work for me,” Driver says, shedding the sweatshirt. “I honestly just look the way I look and it’s difficult to blend in because I’m tall and I look strange. I shouldn’t put a judgment on it.”

Others have judged his appearance more favourably. Driver has been dubbed a “cure for the cookie-cutter leading man” and “a millennial sex symbol”. Which may or may not be a compliment. Although few phrases are as loaded as “unconventionally attractive”, it’s as if those two words were combined expressly to describe Driver. Exaggerated ears; hooded, slanted eyes; long nose with a boxer’s bridge; broad mouth and lips – his disparate features coalesce into a surprisingly appealing whole.

“I guess I never think about it like ‘I am a leading man’ or ‘I am a sex symbol.’ It’s strange to hear that stuff. I don’t think I could have imagined it,” says Driver. Yet, there was his visage on Gap billboard ads; in American Vogue with a black-horned ram slung across his shoulders; in a close-up at the Emmy Awards, where he was nominated for Best Supporting Actor three years in a row for his part in HBO’s Girls; and cast eternally in plastic as a Kylo Ren action figure for Star Wars: The Force Awakens – masked and unmasked versions available. (“Not bad,” he says of the likeness, “but my head and face are a lot bigger.”) Passers-by who once stopped him to ask, “How could you do that to Hannah?” in reference to the bad-boy behaviour of Driver’s character in Lena Dunham’s runaway-success television series, now ask, “How could you do that to Han Solo?”

“It’s a lot,” Driver says, “every part of my life. If we rewound to ten years ago, I would not have said that this is what my life would be.

“And now this music,” he waves his hands at the piano composition streaming through the café like pretentious Musack, “is making that sound so emotional. It isn’t helping, you know?”

Far from angry, the brooding face of millennial angst is smirking. At 33, Adam Driver’s signature intensity hasn’t wavered, but interest in being a tortured artist has. He’s aware of his tendencies – toward anxiety, analysis and absolutism – and is taking steps to temper them. Still, it’s a struggle, seeing good fortune as anything but a cause for self-flagellation.

If we did rewind ten years, we’d see why. Driver was a Gordian knot of clenched intensity. Enrolled at New York’s Juilliard performing arts school, he was so aggressive that his comments made fellow students cry. Every morning he would have six eggs for breakfast, then run five miles to the school from his home in Queens. He would eat a whole chicken for lunch and, during his day at the prestigious drama school, perform random feats, such as 1,000 push-ups.

“That must’ve been an obnoxious thing to be around,” he says, shaking his head. “I was trying to make it as extreme for myself as possible. Now it just makes me so tired and annoyed.”

I’ve met Driver in a peaceful, leafy corner of the Brooklyn Heights neighbourhood that he and his wife, Joanne Tucker, call home. It’s a square precinct full of baby strollers that belies the borough’s hipster cred. “I like sleepy, quiet places,” Driver explains, “because my job is very loud.” Right now he’s savouring a respite from work, the first in a five-year sprint to stardom and even letting himself idle a little. Driver, who has made a career of ill-at-ease eccentricity, is starting to feel comfortable in his own skin.

He genuinely enjoyed himself on the set of Star Wars: The Last Jedi, which will be released in cinemas this December. “The first one was all ‘You can’t fuck it up,’ you know? There was a lot more hanging out this time,” Driver says. “Then there are just practical things, like I have a lightsaber. That’s fun.”

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(A table of contents is available. This series will remain open for additional posts and the table of contents up-to-date as new posts are added.)

Part Twenty: Conversations with Antagonists

Sooner or later, your characters are going to meet up with your antagonist for a conflict. Maybe it’s only during the climax, maybe there are meetings peppered throughout; whatever your structural choice for your narrative might be, we’re all facing one inevitable fact: Our antagonists will speak. Those lines of dialogue, those conversations your protagonist has with them may be the most difficult to nail and nail well. There are so many factors at play–style, character, goals, narrative needs, not to mention the pressure you’ve been building up about this person throughout the entire story!–that writing the dialogue well when it comes time is one of the most daunting tasks.

Avoid constant vague and/or ominous lines, including one-liners:

Let me make myself clear from the start: It’s not that you can’t have any vague, ominous, and/or one-liners, but that you should use them sparingly and judiciously. Constantly being vague, ominous, or quippy leads to a fundamental problem with the antagonist: melodrama. In fact, melodrama is exactly what your antagonist opening their mouth, ever, must vigilantly steer away from. They are the one character who has the uncanny ability to come pre-packaged in melodrama.

Last summer, we spent some time talking about handling characters’ emotions, and part of that is wrapped up in melodrama. I suggest checking out the post to find out more about spotting the beginnings of melodrama in your writing.

The allure of vague, ominous, and witty one-liners is clear: We want our antagonists to seem threatening, to feel as though they have knowledge the protagonist doesn’t have or doesn’t want them to have, to appear smart, smarter or at least more wily and cunning and 100% capable of either having or gaining the upper hand against the protagonist. After all, isn’t that the point of an antagonist?

If an antagonist only speaks in quippy one-liners, they are only ever responding to your protagonist, never initiating the action themselves. If an antagonist is only vague, they are only ever talk, never action. If an antagonist is only ominous, that sense of doom and dread becomes normal, the protagonist acclimates, and it becomes ineffective.

For your dialogue between your antagonist and protagonist to feel genuine, to feel as though they are real people rather than cardboard cut-outs, it sometimes helps to stop thinking about the interactions as having such high stakes. I know that when I’m trying to write these moments, I often find that I get too wrapped up in what the scene/conversation has to do for the story, what things I have to reveal, how much or how little should be unveiled now vs. later, further cement the antagonist as an unlikable person and the protagonist as right and virtuous. I lose sight of the characters in the midst of plot and devices.

Try to bring your thinking out of the mire of plot and back into these characters, who they are, how they speak, what their agenda within the conversation is. They’re just people, trying to do something within the scene. If this were another person who happened to be in their way (a construction worker whose ladder is in the way, or who can’t let them into a room while they’re putting in the carpet, whatever), how would your characters react? Without the knowledge that this is their Big Bad, their #1 Enemy, their Most Hated Rival, how would they navigate the scene? Distancing the characters a little bit from their archetypal story purposes may help you focus better on writing good dialogue and maintaining your characters rather than shoe-horning in the information just for the sake of it.

Avoid extreme emotional reactions:

If you’re one of those writers who can more or less see your story animated like a movie in your mind, you may have experienced the moment where a character says, does, or reveals something, and that ominous beat of music plays–ba-doom!–and the scene cuts to black. Something big, something revolutionary, something the audience needs time to process just happened and a commercial break just played in the metaphorical episode of your tale. Moments like that are great in TV and movies, but the only version of that available in story-telling is to start a new chapter. If all of your major moments and reveals require a new chapter, you’re going to wind up with a very choppy book. Many of us recognize that and turn to other options to cue the audience in to the intensity and importance of what’s been said or done. One of those tactics is, of course, using our protagonist’s and other characters’ reactions.

The classic responses include:

  • “No!”
  • “I won’t let you!”
  • “That’s murder!”
  • “You can’t do that!”
  • general crying,
  • screaming/yelling,
  • a general outpouring of emotion

Among the problems with all of these go-to reaction tendencies is melodrama, certainly. It throws characterization out the window in favor of emphasizing the plot/actions that have occurred, all while under the guise of maintaining and furthering characterization. That’s what makes these reactions so popular: They seem as though they are reinforcing the protagonist’s goal and mission against the antagonist, reinforcing their character. Instead what they do is insult the intelligence of your audience.

If you’ve written your protagonist well, these lines and emotions toward the actions of the antagonist become redundant and don’t necessarily further or develop new facets about your characters. Your audience knows they don’t want the antagonist to do The Thing™, that’s the whole point! That’s what you’ve been building to this entire time! So of course they’re not going to let the antagonist do That; of course they’re upset about it.

It may also be an out-of-character reaction, worse of all. If your protagonist hasn’t been prone to emotional outbursts throughout the story but instead handles things going wrong with snark, outward calm, and a sense of just-get-things-done-cry-about-it-later, then an emotional breakdown at this moment doesn’t follow in line with what you’ve established about the character. “But it’s showing the stress they’re under and the heightened sense of impending danger! Their goals are in jeopardy!” you say. True, but it’s also probably not what your character would do.

We feel strapped in to these reactions because they’re what happens in movies, TV, and a thousand other books. These are the reactions that must happen in order for things to be “right” and fulfilling. In truth, they’re archetypes of emotion that come hand-in-hand with the antagonist/protagonist relationship. It’s time to break away and write real reactions from our characters, ones they would really make.

Next up: Close relationships!

The SW Sequel Trilogy Trio - In all seriousness tho

I recently made a somewhat trash joke post about Rey/Finn/Ben Solo being the new trio to the Star Wars Sequel Trilogy, instead of the Rey/Finn/Poe idea, as seems to be the popular opinion in the fandom as of late.

I don’t want to write an essay so I’ll try to keep it concise (edit from future me: lol, too late, you’re in too deep now), but I do want to articulate why I legitimately believe Rey/Finn/Benny Boy are gonna be our main “trio” in the Sequel Trilogy.

So, to clarify, I think the trios established in the films are:
OT Trio: Luke (main protagonist), Leia, Han

PT Trio: Anakin (main), Obi-wan, Padme

ST: Rey (main), Finn, Ben Extra Solo


First, to clarify, many people seem to think the “trio” implies friendship, or that they gotta be around each other 24/7 for it to work. In my opinion though, the “trio” of Star Wars does not mean: “the characters who are best friends/warm and fuzzy by the end of it all.” The Prequels alone are enough to prove that…

Exhibit A:

Originally posted by seatearss

Exhibit B:

Originally posted by wildflowersx3

Exhibit C:

Originally posted by traitortotheempire

…Yeah, things seem to have gone down the reeeeal “fuzzy feel good” route for this trio, right?


So what is the “trio,” exactly, then? What’s their function and purpose, if not to be bffs and braid each other’s hair at the next sleepover??


In my opinion and based on my observation from each movie up until this point, the “trio” of Star Wars are the three main character arcs that are meant to serve as some lesson and resonate with the audience at a deep emotional level. They are the three “protagonists” of the main story (with one “main” protagonist and two complementing protagonists). They are what drive the main story, the central conflicts and resolutions, and they are the lasting thread continuing beyond their initial stories and into the future of the saga.

It doesn’t really matter if they are “good guys” for the entire story…

Originally posted by insomniun

nor does it matter if they are together for the majority of the story…

Originally posted by ladyvxder

It doesn’t even matter if they live to tell the tale…

Originally posted by anakin-padme10

It’s about their personal melodrama conflicts, trials, and triumphs being front and center, and it’s about who and what drives the main story and resolution/results.


With that said, going back to the topic at hand regarding the ST, I don’t think anyone would argue against the fact that Rey and Finn are two out of the three.  


….So, then, that leaves us with Sad Boy Ben Solo… so, why do I think Ben is part of that trio, if all he does is be a dickwad to provoke our two heroes…?

Well, to be blunt, the most obvious answer to that is: BEN BOY IS EXTRA A SKYWALKER.

But beyond that - which tbh should be enough evidence in and of itself bc this is the SKYWALKER SAGA - there is reason to believe Benny Boy is being set up for a redemption arc and that the Sequel Trilogy is being set up as a mirror/inversion to the Prequel Trilogy.

If we look at it from a cyclical perspective (”Hello, this is Star Wars, have you two met, yet?” - how I feel if u don’t get that this shit is cyclical, yet) and see this as a reverse Prequel Trilogy of sorts we notice that…

The Prequels started off with two jedi (Ani and Old Ben) and one politically inclined person (Padme) tied to a stable Senate and Republic with relative “balance to the Force and peace, which all ended very badly with tragedy and an antagonistic relationship (and ultimately a villain) and rise of a great and evil empire.

With that in mind, I think it could be possible that (although, yes, this is speculation, so calm down) in the Sequel Trilogy, we start off with a trio of an antagonist/villain vs. two good guys, with a terribly dysfunctional political climate/ war and the Force all out of balance, but that eventually the trio end up on the same side in the end, with the mutual goal to destroy the damaging higher powers in place and restore the peace and balance to the Force. So, in other words, we end up with two jedi (Rey and Crylo Ben) to balance the Force, and one strongly tied to the politics (Cinnaroll Finnaroll, everyone’s favorite heart of gold) who will play an integral part in bringing that aspect back together.

See how that would mirror/invert the PT beautifully? It’s poetic, in fact. All of this can really only happen if Ben stops being an asshole evil and decides to do (at least some of) the right things. I’m not saying Anakin 2.0 Ben Solo is gonna be a warm and fuzzy character who ends up BFF ALWAYS AND 4EVR to both Rey and Finn necessarily (although I am personally of the opinion he and Rey gonna date will form a close bond somehow), but for this trilogy to end in any satisfactory way, we can’t just end THE Trilogy of Trilogies - the SKYWALKER SAGA - with the Skywalkers falling to complete darkness and despair.

We’ve already told that story… for proof, see previous Anakin, “I HATE YOU” gif above for reference.

So, if my prediction that Kylo Ren comes back to being Ben Solo once again so that he can restore the Skywalker name and help Rey “find the Force or whatever” with balancing the Force and defeating Snoke, then he has to be one of the Main Three. Such an integral part to the plot demands it.

And, sorry Ben haters, but that’s not to mention that his character arc has ALREADY been so vital to the story and central conflict. Just because he’s a total dickhead villain right now, doesn’t mean his story isn’t central and vital to the main plot. In fact, that’s going to sort of be the point. Rey is going to have to whip his ass into shape convince him that they need each other to fix everything - and that he ultimately, deep down isn’t the Vader fanboy evil persona he pretends to be.

Much like Anakin who was also an asshole in the PT, this new story couldn’t exist without Kylo Ren/Ben Solo. Like Kylo Ren or not, that’s the way it is.

And I think by the end of it all, maybe the haters will be able to come around with Ben. Because, in truth, his full story hasn’t even really been told yet. Who knows what the next two movies will reveal to us?

Be patient, and trust the story tellers to give us something awesome and epic. They want us to love this story and these characters as much as they do. Let’s trust them to do just that.

But anyway, if you’re still skeptical, beyond even all of that word vomit discourse, we have one pretty huge visual clue STARING US RIGHT IN THE FACE from TFA.

To all you naysayers who ask for CANONICAL EVIDENCE and shout about interpretation of literary themes not being “enough” (in a saga that literally follows Joseph Campbell’s Hero’s Journey step by f*cking STEP in the OT - stop invaliding literary analysis in a franchise that takes every page out of the literary trope/theme/motif book)…

…here are some VISUAL CLUES from a VISUAL MEDIA to tip you off about these three and their roles/connections in the story.

Originally posted by gifs-andthings

Originally posted by starwars-gifs

Originally posted by morganella-morganii

If you think JJ my man doesn’t know what he is doing here, you’re a fool. That is intentional visual story telling if I ever saw it right there.

By putting them in masks, JJ is telling us, “these are the characters we are meant to discover,” the ones we are to come to identify with. They are the ones with the central journeys, the most growth, the real stories to tell. We learn our lessons from them, and the other characters support and inform their arc. Poe, Leia, Luke, Rose, etc. are of course vital to the story, but they are there to support and inform these three character arcs, which lie at the center of it all.


Anyway, that’s my opinion on the matter, based on thoughtful observation and consideration, as well as some background in literary analysis.


Thoughts/Additions/Disagreements welcome. It’s ok to be wrong (<THAT IS A JOKE CALM DOWN STANLEY) disagree.

butteredonions  asked:

So. Ulaz. if he survived. and was on the castle with the paladins for a while. what he might think of 'strange earth customs'. that maybe shiro introduces him to. accidentally. or on purpose. maybe. I mean. you know.

MISS ONIONS HOW DARE YOU COME INTO MY INBOX WITH ANOTHER PAIRING POSSIBILITY. HOW DARE.

(also I apologize this is only like PART of your prompt because I didn’t want to write a 10k story at work IT’S JUST ABOUT TOUCH AND TOUCHING AND ANYWAY)

a lazy temptation

The Castle was quiet, a gentle hum of energy accompanying Ulaz as he made his usual rounds of the halls. The Princess had kindly gifted him a map of the entire complex, though some spots were suspiciously blacked out. They were easy enough areas to get into, but Ulaz appreciated her general wariness in giving a potential enemy access to the Castle of Lions.

The patrols calmed him, channelled his unused energy into a useful task. Since leaving the Empire to assist the Paladins in the daunting task of wresting control from Zarkon, his routine had become more…lax. The Castle of Lions spanned wide; usually, he was on patrol for hours, just the quiet of his thoughts and the hush of his feet his only company. Solutions came easier in the calm of patrol.  

As he turned another corner, the room on the far left flicked, light spilling and fracturing the gentle shadows of the hall. He picked his way over, peering inside, and was surprised to find one of the many lounges in use. A holograph played across the entire far wall, aliens moving and dancing and talking in a language Ulaz could not quite track.

Though he wasn’t interested in the movie.

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Thor: Ragnarok - Third Time Really Is The Charm

(As usual - Spoiler Warning)

Bless 👏 this 👏 cinematic 👏 masterpiece 👏 Honestly, this movie makes you root for Thor. I’m so happy this film is the one Marvel’s ending 2017 on, like, what a come back. The pacing, the score, the humor, the characters, the colors, the PLOT! Usually I avoid trailers like the plague because I feel like they give too much of the film away. And admittedly I only watched one or two of the Thor: Ragnarok trailers. But holy shit, those two trailers were the single greatest misdirect of Marvel cinematic history! I mean, the trailers made the movie look good, but the actual movie was EVEN BETTER!!!!!! WOW. Bravo trailer producers, way to do it right! 

Here are some of my favorite things about Thor: Ragnarok
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• First of all, MURDER PUPPY!!!!!!!! I WANT ONE.

• Soundtrack on point, absolutely perfect!!!

• Hela’s hair!!!!!!! Goals.

• The fight choreography!!!!! Holy shit well done, way to get me so pumped up I can’t get to bed until 2 a.m.! Nice.

• The COLORS! I am IN LOVE with Marvel’s new MCU branding holy shit. All the neon is fueling my soul!

• Those camera angles! Real talk, that scene where we get Loki and Valkyrie walking up to the Grandmaster and the camera circles from behind them, through the floor, and then back up in front of them???? *fans self*

• The Grandmaster - what a character. Omg, he pulls you in. He’s that kind of dangerous charismatic where you know there’s something off about him, the planet, this whole situation. But man, is it easy to just forget about all that when the Grandmaster starts talking.

• They made Thor likeable, they made him relatable, they showed him mature?????? Like, in the span of 2.5 hours we watched Thor go from “douche-bag, my actions have no consequences, I do what I want” dudebro to “responsible, respectful, funny, I take responsibility for my actions and learn from them” dudebro???? HELL YES FINALLY. AND they didn’t give him his hammer back at the end because - guess what?? - he’s the Lord God of Thunder and he doesn’t fucking NEED it. Omg, he’s just raw POWER there by the end holy fuck.

• This movie listened to the fans and gave us what we deserve - good character development for EVERYONE. Thor, Hulk, Valkyrie, the Executioner, Odin, Loki, Bruce got some development, heck - they even fleshed out Hela’s character without cornering her into the stereotypical “Woman Scorned” trope!

Now, hear me out on that. It looks at first glance like she is the “Woman Scorned,” and yes - she was scorned by Odin. But! Instead of her motivation being simply, “I was burned so now I will exact my revenge,” (cinematically setting her up to fail) she plays the long game. Hela waits. She waits because she knows Odin will die one day, and I don’t know if any of you noticed, but she didn’t waste any time thinking of a new revenge plot when she got back to Asgard.

She just picked right up where she left off before Odin banished her. His banishing her was a blip on her radar, it *didn’t phase her at all.* It was nothing to her. I mean, yeah she was pissed, who wouldn’t be? But she wasn’t pulling any of this shit to get revenge on the Asgardians. She wouldn’t have touched them if they had submitted to her rule. She was not there for revenge, she was there to finish what she started. To have Asgard be the ruling land of the entire universe, beyond the nine realms, with her on the throne.

AND SHE WAS WINNING!!!! Thor had to literally kick-start the Nordic apocalypse, the very thing he was initially trying to prevent, just to stop her! Like, my Death Wife is a force not to be reckoned with, she will beat your ass without a thought. And she loves Fenris, what a good mom 😍

• There was no happy, tied up with a bow ending!!!! I just said this, but I’m gonna say it again, they had to purposefully trigger Ragnarok and burn Asgard to the ground in order to defeat Hela. There was no magic “Get out of jail free” card to win here. Losing was their only option: either lose to Hela or lose to the start of Ragnarok. Consequences from actions in past movies were felt. Hard. That’s so rare to see in a superhero movie. I am here 👏 for 👏 it 👏

• Hi, yes. Could Hela please crush me? It would be an honor. Hela is a brutal fighter and I’m LIVING FOR IT. She held nothing back, she single-handedly took out the entire Asgardian army!!! Homegirl lived up to her title holy shit yessss. First, Wonder Woman, then Atomic Blonde, and now Thor: Ragnarok. 2017 is delivering the most bad ass women on the big screen!!

• Speaking of, CAN WE TALK ABOUT VALKYRIE???? Like, homegirl can get it. What a woman, I love her. She straight up annihilated that scavenger group while absolutely shitfaced. She has authority on this chaos-ridden planet, you can see it when she talks to the Grandmaster. He respects her! She’s good, and she knows it. Yes! Let women be proud of and flaunt their skills in combat!

   ° Thor wanted be a Valkyrie when he grew up, if that ain’t the cutest shit…..He has such respect and admiration for her, you can see it in the way he speaks about and acts toward her. Fanboy!Thor is pure.   

• No Romance!!!! Bless

• ASGARD’S NOT A PLACE IT’S A PEOPLE 😢😢😢😭😭😭😭

• Omg the sibling dynamic was strong. We got to see some growth here between Thor and Loki, bless.

     ° Thor just throwing random shit at his brother to see if he’s actually physically there.
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     ° ‎Loki turning himself into Thor’s favorite animal (a SNAKE btw) just so he could go “surprise!” and stab him.
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     ° ‎Loki having MULTIPLE opportunities to ditch Thor and leave him and Asgard to burn yet coming back at the last second every single time to help his bro??? (With the ulterior motive of having the spotlight to himself, but come on!) 
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     ° ‎Thor outsmarting Loki (CHARACTER GROWTH LOOK WHO’S NOT A STUPID JOCK) at every turn and knowing he can’t fully trust Loki but also knowing that Loki’s NEVER going to provide help unless he gets something out of it? And knowing how to *play* Loki right back. Knowing how to trick the trickster into helping by playing the dick older brother “You’re a trickster, you won’t help” card. He knows Loki’ll want to prove him wrong.  
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      ‎° GET. HELP.
      ‎
      ° ‎ExcuUse you Marvel. Where’s my bro hug?!?!?!?

• Bruce!!! My smol anxious green bean with 7 PhDs, I will protect you!

• Thor trying his best to help Bruce through a panic attack with his limited knowledge of Natasha’s lullaby.

• Canon proof that the Hulk isn’t some dumb rage machine! He’s smart, has a sense of humor, shows restraint, can string full sentences and thoughts together. Why would anyone expect otherwise? The guy lives in the head of BRUCE BANNER. What? You think he didn’t pick anything up? Geeezeee.

• The new brotp is Hulk and Valkyrie, I will fight anyone who says otherwise.

• Fuck Strange. He didn’t need to be there. The shoehorning was real. Ughhh.

• R.I.P. Tony’s pants 

Thor: Ragnarok a.k.a. my longest “Yeah Boi” ever. 
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10/10, Marvel’s getting it’s MCU groove back. This movie reminded me so much of the “Thor: God of Thunder” comics by Aaron and Ribic. It’s so good and it’s so unforgiving. Ugh! I want more!!!! The critics got it right, you guys. This movie is so good. 

You deserve some good in your life, so go see Thor: Ragnarok. You will leave a happy bean and feeling like you can conquer any obstacle in your life.