allies force

Ways to un-stick a stuck story
  • Do an outline, whatever way works best. Get yourself out of the word soup and know where the story is headed.
  • Conflicts and obstacles. Hurt the protagonist, put things in their way, this keeps the story interesting. An easy journey makes the story boring and boring is hard to write.
  • Change the POV. Sometimes all it takes to untangle a knotted story is to look at it through different eyes, be it through the sidekick, the antagonist, a minor character, whatever.
  • Know the characters. You can’t write a story if the characters are strangers to you. Know their likes, dislikes, fears, and most importantly, their motivation. This makes the path clearer.
  • Fill in holes. Writing doesn’t have to be linear; you can always go back and fill in plotholes, and add content and context.
  • Have flashbacks, hallucinations, dream sequences or foreshadowing events. These stir the story up, deviations from the expected course add a feeling of urgency and uncertainty to the narrative.
  • Introduce a new mystery. If there’s something that just doesn’t add up, a big question mark, the story becomes more compelling. Beware: this can also cause you to sink further into the mire.
  • Take something from your protagonist. A weapon, asset, ally or loved one. Force him to operate without it, it can reinvigorate a stale story.
  • Twists and betrayal. Maybe someone isn’t who they say they are or the protagonist is betrayed by someone he thought he could trust. This can shake the story up and get it rolling again.
  • Secrets. If someone has a deep, dark secret that they’re forced to lie about, it’s a good way to stir up some fresh conflict. New lies to cover up the old ones, the secret being revealed, and all the resulting chaos.
  • Kill someone. Make a character death that is productive to the plot, but not “just because”. If done well, it affects all the characters, stirs up the story and gets it moving.
  • Ill-advised character actions. Tension is created when a character we love does something we hate. Identify the thing the readers don’t want to happen, then engineer it so it happens worse than they imagined.
  • Create cliff-hangers. Keep the readers’ attention by putting the characters into new problems and make them wait for you to write your way out of it. This challenge can really bring out your creativity.
  • Raise the stakes. Make the consequences of failure worse, make the journey harder. Suddenly the protagonist’s goal is more than he expected, or he has to make an important choice.
  • Make the hero active. You can’t always wait for external influences on the characters, sometimes you have to make the hero take actions himself. Not necessarily to be successful, but active and complicit in the narrative.
  • Different threat levels. Make the conflicts on a physical level (“I’m about to be killed by a demon”), an emotional level (“But that demon was my true love”) and a philosophical level (“If I’m forced to kill my true love before they kill me, how can love ever succeed in the face of evil?”).
  • Figure out an ending. If you know where the story is going to end, it helps get the ball rolling towards that end, even if it’s not the same ending that you actually end up writing.
  • What if? What if the hero kills the antagonist now, gets captured, or goes insane? When you write down different questions like these, the answer to how to continue the story will present itself.
  • Start fresh or skip ahead. Delete the last five thousand words and try again. It’s terrifying at first, but frees you up for a fresh start to find a proper path. Or you can skip the part that’s putting you on edge – forget about that fidgety crap, you can do it later – and write the next scene. Whatever was in-between will come with time.
History of Gay Rights in Germany

1794: The Kingdom of Prussia abolishes the death penalty for sodomy

August 29, 1867: Karl Heinrich Ulrichs becomes the first self-proclaimed homosexual to speak out for the repeal of anti-gay laws at the  Congress of German Jurists in Munich.

1869: The term “homosexuality” appears for the first time in a German-Hungarian pamphlet written by human rights campaigner Karl-Maria Kertbeny

1871: Homosexuality is criminalized by Paragraph 175 of the Reich Criminal Code.

1907: Adolf Brand, member of a gay rights organization, publishes a piece “outing” the imperial cancellor of Germany, Prince Bernhard von Bülow. He is sued for libel and is sentenced to 18 months in prison.

1907-1909: The Harden-Eulenburg affair. Even more people are called gay and sue for libel.

1919: Magnus Hirschfeld co-founds the Institut für Sexualwissenschaft (Institute for Sex Research), a pioneer calling for the civil and social acceptance of gay and trans people.

1919: Anders als die Anderen (Different from the Others), one of the first explicitly gay films, premiers. Magnus Hirschfeld was a co-writer and funded its production.

October 16, 1929: A Reichstag Committee votes to repeal Paragraph 175. The Nazis’ rise to power prevents the implementation.

1931: Mädchen in Uniform, one of the first pro-lesbian films, is released.

1933: The Nazi party bans homosexual groups. Gay people are sent to concentration camps. Nazis burn the Institut für Sexualwissenschaften to the ground.

1937: First use of the pink triangle for gay men in concentration camps.

1945: After the liberation of concentration camps by the allied forces, gay people have to serve out the full term of there sentences under Paragraph 175.

1950: East Germany partially abolishes the Nazis’ emendations to Paragraph 175.

1968: East Germany decriminalizes homosexual acts for people over the age of 18.

1969: West Germany decriminalizes homosexual acts.

1974: General Gay Association, the second openly-LGBT rights organization in German history, is established.

1985: Herbert Rusche becomes the first openly-gay member of the Bundestag.

1987: Jutta Oesterle-Schwamm becomes the first lesbian member of the Bundestag.

1994: The Supreme Court rules that the age of consent for sex must be equalized.

2000: The Bundestag apologizes to gays and lesbians persecuted under the Nazi regime, and for “harm done to homosexual citizens up to 1969”.

2001: Same-Sex couples get the right to enter a civil partnership. Klaus Wowereit becomes the first openly-gay major of Berlin, making Berlin the largest city of the world with a gay major. Ole von Beust becomes the first openly-gay major of Hamburg.

2002: Same-sex stepchild adoption is legalized. Guido Westerwelle, leader of the FDP, becomes the first leader of a major party to come out as gay.

2009: Westerwelle becomes the first openly-gay member of the Federal Cabinet

2013: Barbara Hendricks becomes the first openly-lesbian member of the Federal Cabinet

March 22, 2017: The Bundestag votes in favor of rehabilitation for those presecuted under Paragraph 175.

June 30, 2017: Same-Sex marriage and adoption is legalized.

This is such a small thing in the sea of things I loved about Wonder Woman, but I would just like to point out that they fucking referenced the genocide of native Americans by white people as an example of all humans beings doing terrible things, even the “good guys” and I was honestly just blown away by that. Too often in World War I or II movies there’s a line in the sand drawn with the good and the evil and war is just never that simple. Americans came into World War I as “heroes” but they had literally just finished destroying an entire race. Too often War films forget that, especially superhero ones. I love Captain America to bits, but the cartoonish oversimplification of all Germans as evil and the Allied forces as all good is a dangerous one. It makes people forget that all humans have a capacity for evil. So it kind of blew my mind to see Wonder Woman touching on that in such a simple, elegant way.

6

Size matters not. Look at me. Judge me by my size do you? And, well, you should not… for my ally is the Force. And a powerful ally it is. Life creates it, makes it grow. Its energy surrounds us and binds us. Luminous beings are we, not this crude matter. You must feel the Force around you, here between you, me, the trees, the rocks… everywhere.

10

Size matters not. Look at me. Judge me by my size, do you? Hmm? Hmm. And well you should not. For my ally is the Force, and a powerful ally it is. Life creates it, makes it grow. Its energy surrounds us and binds us. Luminous beings are we, not this crude matter. You must feel the Force around you; here, between you, me, the tree, the rock, everywhere, yes. Even between the land and the ship.

Star Wars: Episode V - The Empire Strikes Back | 1980 | dir. Irvin Kershner

8

“Size matters not. Look at me. Judge me by my size, do you? Hmm? Hmm. And well you should not. For my ally is the Force, and a powerful ally it is. Life creates it, makes it grow. Its energy surrounds us and binds us. Luminous beings are we, not this crude matter. You must feel the Force around you; here, between you, me, the tree, the rock, everywhere, yes. Even between the land and the ship.”