alli white

tips on being a good white ally and fighting culture appropriation!!
  • refer to a group of poc as a racist slur that was used against them
  • have no idea it was a racist slur in the first place
  • call an east asian a weeaboo 
  • be a piece of shit in general
  • congratulations you stopped those mean old colored folks!!! 

I’ll say it before and I’ll say it again:

You cannot challenge racism, on this level, by being nice to and reaching out to white supremacists.  Their entire ideology revolves around dehumanizing us.  It just does. not. work.  

You cannot fight fascism by prioritizing the feelings of fascists and letting them think they’re safe around you.  You don’t “get them on your side”.  Because treating them kindly and respecting them, gives them your silent approval and access to those of you who are way more vulnerable than you are and who cannot afford to feel safe enough to “debate” with these monsters. 

Our humanity is not a question or a debate topic, and by giving these people a platform you legitimize their views and help spread them to a larger audience. 

How to support the Black Lives Matter movement as a white ally

White allyship, though it may sound difficult, is a key part of the fight against white supremacy. To learn more about how white people can contribute to the Black Lives Matter movement, Mic spoke to Heather Cronk, the interim co-director of Showing Up for Racial Justice, a national network of groups and individuals that organizes white people in the fight for racial justice. 

There is a clear place for white people in this movement. 

  • Many white people Cronk encounters feel like the movement for black lives is “not for them” and that they “don’t see themselves in it,” she said. But, that’s simply not true.
  • “There’s a clear role for white folks to play as part of a multiracial movement for racial justice,” Cronk said in a phone interview. 
  • “Undermining and disentangling ourselves from white supremacy is something that benefits white people in addition to benefitting folks of color." 
  • But, Cronk stressed, "part of the work is trusting black leadership” to direct white allies in ways that are helpful to the movement. 
  • Cronk laid out a few easy ways for white people to start finding their place in the movement: 
  • Namely donating to a black-led organization and staying informed about the Black Lives Matter movement by reading works from writers of color. 

Start with deepening your relationships with black people and other people of color.

  • White people must also work on their relationships with people of color, especially organizers.
  • “One of the most important things you can do as a white person is to build deep relationships with folks of color who you know but haven’t had this relationship with or are doing organizing work in your community,” Cronk said. 
  • “That’s far more authentic than saying ‘I’m ready to do work now’ but not having relational context to that work. Being in deep and accountable relationships is essential to the work.”
  • While it may be uncomfortable to broach topics like police brutality with your friends of color, white people have to get past their own fears.
  • “Systems of oppression rely on silence in order to exist,” Cronk said. “It’s important to have that conversation rather than not have it, even if that means you tumble all over yourself and you look awkward." 

But don’t rely on your friends of color to educate you.

  • People of color often take on the emotional labor of racism, but not every person of color is willing to do educate white people about racism.
  • In that case, Cronk says, if you want to have talks about race with black friends, you should ask for their consent first and let them know that the conversation can be on their terms.
  • In the meantime, check out this curriculum for white allies looking to learn about race and this Black Lives Matter syllabus from New York University, complete with videos and movies to watch.

Your work needs to start with your own family.

  • Talking about racism at the holiday dinner table may be difficult, but it has to be done.
  • It’s important for white people to engage in anti-racist work to "come out” to their family and friends as people who are trying to fight white supremacy, as allies to black people and people of color.
  • “White folks who want to show solidarity with folks of color, yes you have to come out as being an anti-racist white person, and part of that is not opting out of that when it feels like it might be tough,” Cronk said. “That’s the privilege that allies to oppressed communities have.”

Becoming an ally will be hard work, but it’s worth it. Read more

follow @the-movemnt

huffingtonpost.com
Dear White People, Your Safety Pins Are Embarrassing
We don’t get to make ourselves feel better by putting on safety pins and self-designating ourselves as allies.

Let me explain something, white people: We just fucked up. Bad. We elected a racist demagogue who has promised to do serious harm to almost every person who isn’t a straight white male, and whose rhetoric has already stirred up hate crimes nationwide. White people were 70% of the voters in the 2016 election, and we’re the only demographic Trump won. It doesn’t matter why. What matters is there’s a white nationalist moving into the Oval Office, and white people — only white people — put him there.

We don’t get to make ourselves feel better by putting on safety pins and self-designating ourselves as allies.

And make no mistake, that’s what the safety pins are for. Making White people feel better. They’ll do little or nothing to reassure the marginalized populations they are allegedly there to reassure; marginalized people know full well the long history of white people calling themselves allies while doing nothing to help, or even inflicting harm on, non-white Americans.

… If you really need some way to show your support, if you just can’t bear to sit in your discomfort for even a little bit longer, here’s my suggestion: Instead of doing the thing white people invented to make ourselves feel better, follow the example of the people from the marginalized communities you want to support.

There are better, more active ways of showing support to marginalized communities. Volunteer, donate, get in touch and get involved!