allegory black

The Great Shipwreck of Life

In your skin

To die a little death

This time there’s no code word

When everyday frays in hollow ends

Dream sweet love submissive


My secret friend

Oh take me to the river

My secret friend

So we can swim forever….

____________

To the brave and the petrified

We all fall down

To the slave and the civilised

We all fall down

To the lovers we left behind

The bad days, the good nights

In the great shipwreck of life

We all fall down

Born we are

Between the hard black rock

And the code of the immortal

Torn from cars

From the flames of the brave

And the bosom we can’t return to

We light up the bars of the world

With the decadent essence of innocence

Free but sharp

We can be the satellite guiding through the dark….

To the great and the petrified

We all fall down

To the slaves and the civilized

We all fall down

To the lovers we left behind

The bad days, the good nights

In the great shipwreck of life

We all fall down….

_______

Inspired by songs of  wonderful IAMX “My secret friend” and “The Great Shipwreck of Life”

For one person that i really love and i love his art. Accept that you are not bad. You are amazing!

Spongebob Discourse

The “Texas” episode is clearly meant as an allegory for hardworking black women (Sandy) in STEM who come from poor backgrounds trying to make a name for themselves in an affluent white town. 

Throughout her stay, Sandy is on the receiving end of microaggressions including her accent, her traditions and her physical appearance. Her teeth, as well as her supposedly low intelligence, were even a punchline in SpongeBob’s short stint as a comedian. 

Fed up with this treatment and longing for home, Sandy decides to abandon this toxic environment and return to the eponymous Texas. But realizing that they might be found out as racists, SpongeBob (a white/white passing sponge) and Patrick (a white who doesn’t tan well) attempt to get her to stay so she can fulfill the diversity quota. 

But this quickly goes downhill when Patrick resorts to those microaggressions we discussed earlier, and calls Texas “D*mb”. Taking a note from her Pa (mentioned in the worm episode), Sandy harnesses the powers of physics to turn that bus around and request for Patrick “What did you just say?” (Please note that this speaks volumes about Sandy’s character, as she didn’t immediately resort to violence but at least TRIED to be calm) 

here’s the thing. fiction does not exist in a vaccuum. there is no such thing as a narrative untouched by real history. the omnic crisis in overwatch is about sentient robots used for labor and shown to be mistreated uprising against humankind for it. unintentional or not, this part of the lore is an allegory to black history in the united states. the fact that omnics are further discriminated against in both lore and in ingame interactions does solidify this.

there are characters ingame that comment on it. torbjorn has the line, “If you ask me, the Brits have their heads on straight!Omnic rights? Pah!” it is a narrative about sentient human-like beings used for labor having an uprising for rights. it’s about these people, being denied their rights, being discriminated against by people in the lore and ingame characters that you play as.

that reflects black history. this is a narrative that mirrors antiblackness and racism as a whole. and racism exists everywhere. it is not a us-centric issue. portraying omnics as the bad guys on top of letting characters make anti-omnic comments with no backlash or punishment (and portraying these characters as heroes, no less) is just racist. it is. it does not matter that the head writer of the narrative is asian, anyone is capable of writing a racist and antiblack narrative.

Allegory of Music by Filippino Lippi (between 1475 and 1500) 
Gemäldegalerie, Berlin. The “Allegory of Music” is a popular theme in painting. Lippi uses symbols popular during the High Renaissance, many of which refer to Greek mythology. original | edit

Allegory 

First attested in English in 1382, the word allegory comes from Latin allegoria, the latinisation of the Greek ἀλληγορία (allegoria), “veiled language, figurative,” which in turn comes from both ἄλλος (allos), “another, different” and ἀγορεύω (agoreuo), “to harangue, to speak in the assembly” which originate from ἀγορά (agora), “assembly”.
As a literary device, an allegory in its most general sense is an extended metaphor. Allegory has been used widely throughout the histories of all forms of art, largely because it readily illustrates complex ideas and concepts in ways that are comprehensible to its viewers, readers, or listeners. Allegories are typically used as literary devices or rhetorical devices that convey hidden meanings through symbolic figures, actions, imagery, and/or events, which together create the moral, spiritual, or political meaning the author wishes to convey. One of the best known examples is Plato’s Allegory of the Cave, a part of his larger work The Republic. In this allegory, there are a group of people who have lived chained in a cave all of their lives, facing a blank wall (514a-b). The people watch shadows projected on the wall by things passing in front of a fire behind them and begin to ascribe forms to these shadows, using language to identify their world (514c-515a). According to the allegory, the shadows are as close as the prisoners get to viewing reality, until one of them finds his way into the outside world where he sees the actual objects that produced the shadows. He tries to tell the people in the cave of his discovery, but they do not believe him and vehemently resist his efforts to free them so they can see for themselves (516e-518a). This allegory is, on a basic level, about a philosopher who upon finding greater knowledge outside the cave of human understanding, seeks to share it as is his duty, and the foolishness of those who would ignore him because they think themselves educated enough.

Allegory of Fortune by Salvator Rosa (1658 - 1659)
The J. Paul Getty Museum. Representing Fortuna, the Goddess of luck, with the horn of plenty. Original | Edit

Allegory
First attested in English in 1382, the word allegory comes from Latin allegoria, the latinisation of the Greek ἀλληγορία (allegoria), “veiled language, figurative,” which in turn comes from both ἄλλος (allos), “another, different” and ἀγορεύω (agoreuo), “to harangue, to speak in the assembly” which originate from ἀγορά (agora), “assembly”.
As a literary device, an allegory in its most general sense is an extended metaphor. Allegory has been used widely throughout the histories of all forms of art, largely because it readily illustrates complex ideas and concepts in ways that are comprehensible to its viewers, readers, or listeners. Allegories are typically used as literary devices or rhetorical devices that convey hidden meanings through symbolic figures, actions, imagery, and/or events, which together create the moral, spiritual, or political meaning the author wishes to convey. One of the best known examples is Plato’s Allegory of the Cave, a part of his larger work The Republic. In this allegory, there are a group of people who have lived chained in a cave all of their lives, facing a blank wall (514a-b). The people watch shadows projected on the wall by things passing in front of a fire behind them and begin to ascribe forms to these shadows, using language to identify their world (514c-515a). According to the allegory, the shadows are as close as the prisoners get to viewing reality, until one of them finds his way into the outside world where he sees the actual objects that produced the shadows. He tries to tell the people in the cave of his discovery, but they do not believe him and vehemently resist his efforts to free them so they can see for themselves (516e-518a). This allegory is, on a basic level, about a philosopher who upon finding greater knowledge outside the cave of human understanding, seeks to share it as is his duty, and the foolishness of those who would ignore him because they think themselves educated enough.

What I wish for most in this season of giving, for you, for me, for posterity, in the deepest reaches of my heart, is that not one more overpriced low-quality paraffin nightmare Yankee candle ever again adorn the homes of our friends and loved ones.

Please. Stop polluting your life with ugly petrochemical byproduct garbage. These candles sell for 8 times what they’re worth. They’re trash. They’re the Walmart of home scents.

Love yourself more than this. Be kinder to yourself. Soy/vegetable/blends only. 

Trim your wicks, and be happy.

I love you, and you deserve this.

Zootopia looks like a great movie but It seems a little more confusing than it needs to be. Remember this movie is about institutionalized prejudice, which is already a little complicated for the child audience. Now I haven’t seen the movie but I’ve seen all the trailers and read all the spoilers and it seems like the movie never picks a side. It discusses stereotypes by showing how different species of animals are oppressed by being stereotyped. Except that would mean EVERY animal species is a racial minority.
Nick the fox is oppressed because he’s a predator, at the top of the food chain, so other animals consider him dangerous and sneaky a clear allegory for how black/Muslim men are treated

Then there’s Judy the bunny who is oppressed because she’s a prey animal. Other animals consider her to be cute and not much else, small and weak and fragile, and carrot-obsessed. This might be an analogy for how western Asian women are oppressed, fetish-ized, seen as submissive, cute, anime waifus.

Now don’t get me wrong different races can be oppressed in different ways, but There needs to be an ‘oppressive’ race, a species, or class, of animal that’s at the top, maybe resented by less privileged races of animals but overall holds the majority of authority and representation

But you can’t DO that if you establish that predator mammals AND prey mammals are both oppressed racial minorities. Now don’t get me wrong, minorities do hold prejudices against each other, but there’s still an 'authority’ race that fuels the prejudice and pits minorities against each other, trying to foster an attitude of “yeah I may be (insert minority here) but at least I’m not (insert different minority here) lol those guys are the worst,”

If they’re trying to make an accurate analogy there needs to be an animal or animal class that’s equivalent to white people. But I don’t know how they’re going to do that if the two big animal classes are Prey and Predator, but it’s clearly established that BOTH are treated as racial minorities and face equal prejudice.