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Arrow 3x16 - The Offer

I don’t know about you guys, but I am glad hiatus is over.All that theorising, the speculation, the agonizing wait is finally over and we can get down to the serious business of the meaty part of this season. This show excels at its final third, so I am excited for this upcoming batch of episodes, even as I know that things are about to get a whole lot worse for Oliver and his friends.

As for ‘The Offer’ – I. LOVED. THIS. EPISODE. Guys, guys!! Wasn’t it amazing? I feel like the fandom has suddenly taken a dip in the Lazarus Pit and emerged fresh, rejuvenated and filled with hope. I don’t know if it was because we had so few spoilers for this episode – and that literally NONE of the Olicity scenes were spoiled, THANK YOU ARROW PEEPS! – or because the Oliver and Felicity of it all was so season 2 classic that it’s not even funny, but this episode was a ray (sorry!) of sunshine in an otherwise overwhelmingly dark season. It’s like someone else said – it felt like a “flirt embargo” had been lifted and suddenly we were showered with all the goodness we have wanted all season long. I don’t expect this happy mood to last (this is Arrow, after all), but this week, I am in a very good place.

Let’s get into this.

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It was 40 years ago today, more or less, that my book about the Beatles first came out. While working on it, I asked all the Beatles for an example of their writing, some scrap that I could use to identify each hand. I also picked up hand-scribbled lyrics from the floor of Abbey Road, stuff that otherwise would have been burned by the cleaners.

Some time early in 1967 I was visiting George Harrison at his bungalow in Esher when he gave me a few lines of what appeared to be a poem.

I’m happy to say that it’s only a
dream -
when I come across people like you.
It’s only a dream and you make it
obscene
with the things that you think and
you do.
You’re so unaware of the pain that
I bear
and jealous for what you can’t do
there’s times when I feel that you
haven’t a hope
but I also know that isn’t true -

On the reverse side, in Brian Epstein’s hand, were instructions on how to reach Epstein’s country house in Sussex. Six months later, George gave me a better example of his handiwork - the original handwritten lyrics to “Blue Jay Way”, which was on the Magical Mystery Tour album. I used this in the first edition of the book, in 1968, and forgot all about his piece of unfinished poetry, just shoved it in a drawer. I came across it again last year, when working on a new, updated edition of the original book, and decided to include it, thinking it might amuse Beatles fans, or be of use to some brain box researching the band.

I sent a copy to Pattie Boyd, who was married to George at the time. She agreed it was George’s handwriting, and sounded like him, but she had no knowledge of it. I also sent it to Olivia, his widow, and to Paul McCartney, but neither had seen it before. I said in the book that I thought it sounded like typical teenage angst, written perhaps when George was in his late teens or early 20s, after some girl done him wrong. It’s interesting now, after all these years, as it shows that George was writing away creatively, if privately, from an early age, long before he was allowed, or had enough confidence, to contribute his own songs to Beatles albums.

Last week, I handed it over to the British Library, where it has joined the 10 or so other handwritten lyrics by John and Paul on display in the manuscript room, next to Magna Carta, Shakespeare, Beethoven, Wordsworth, Austen. It’s not there on any great poetic or musical merits, but because it is the only example the BL has of a manuscript in George’s hand. I presumed, as people studied it in the BL, or read the words in the book, that eventually some late-middle-aged woman would come forward and say “It was me, I’m the girl in George’s poem”. But I’ve now had second thoughts. I’ve decided that it’s not about a girl, but a boy. And that boy was John Lennon.

When George first joined the Quarrymen - the precursor of the Beatles - in 1958, he was just 15, possibly only 14 (no one knows the exact date), the youngest and least mature member of the skiffle group. He idolised John. John was the macho, dominant, strutting leader. George the callow boy. We all know John could be cruel, as he boasted later about his awful behaviour, making fun of cripples, drawing sick cartoons, saying horrible things. He clearly caused pain to many people who loved him - girls especially, but presumably also to George and perhaps even to Paul, his so-called best friends.

George had been invited into the group and eventually became greatly admired. Despite his tender years, he was an excellent guitarist, far better than John, who was probably quite jealous of his instrumental skills as well as his hard work and determination to improve them - something John could not always be bothered with.

The first six lines of George’s poem can therefore be read as referring to John. As for the last two lines, this could be George thinking, as many people did at the time, that John, for all his obvious originality, wouldn’t get anywhere in life - he’d muck around, end up dossing like his father Fred had done. John himself feared he hadn’t a hope of getting a normal job or earning a living. If, however, my revised interpretation of the poem is correct, then George was one person who did have faith in John.

—  Hunter Davies, The Guardian (May 2009)

A previously unseen and unused lyric by George Harrison (image found at the BBC website)

>> It was 40 years ago today, more or less, that my book about the Beatles first came out. While working on it, I asked all the Beatles for an example of their writing, some scrap that I could use to identify each hand. I also picked up hand-scribbled lyrics from the floor of Abbey Road, stuff that otherwise would have been burned by the cleaners.

Some time early in 1967 I was visiting George Harrison at his bungalow in Esher when he gave me a few lines of what appeared to be a poem.

I’m happy to say that it’s only a
dream -
when I come across people like you.
It’s only a dream and you make it
obscene
with the things that you think and
you do.
You’re so unaware of the pain that
I bear
and jealous for what you can’t do
there’s times when I feel that you
haven’t a hope
but I also know that isn’t true -

On the reverse side, in Brian Epstein’s hand, were instructions on how to reach Epstein’s country house in Sussex. Six months later, George gave me a better example of his handiwork - the original handwritten lyrics to “Blue Jay Way”, which was on the Magical Mystery Tour album. I used this in the first edition of the book, in 1968, and forgot all about his piece of unfinished poetry, just shoved it in a drawer. I came across it again last year, when working on a new, updated edition of the original book, and decided to include it, thinking it might amuse Beatles fans, or be of use to some brain box researching the band.

I sent a copy to Pattie Boyd, who was married to George at the time. She agreed it was George’s handwriting, and sounded like him, but she had no knowledge of it. I also sent it to Olivia, his widow, and to Paul McCartney, but neither had seen it before. I said in the book that I thought it sounded like typical teenage angst, written perhaps when George was in his late teens or early 20s, after some girl done him wrong. It’s interesting now, after all these years, as it shows that George was writing away creatively, if privately, from an early age, long before he was allowed, or had enough confidence, to contribute his own songs to Beatles albums.

Last week, I handed it over to the British Library, where it has joined the 10 or so other handwritten lyrics by John and Paul on display in the manuscript room, next to Magna Carta, Shakespeare, Beethoven, Wordsworth, Austen. It’s not there on any great poetic or musical merits, but because it is the only example the BL has of a manuscript in George’s hand. I presumed, as people studied it in the BL, or read the words in the book, that eventually some late-middle-aged woman would come forward and say “It was me, I’m the girl in George’s poem”. But I’ve now had second thoughts. I’ve decided that it’s not about a girl, but a boy. And that boy was John Lennon.

When George first joined the Quarrymen - the precursor of the Beatles - in 1958, he was just 15, possibly only 14 (no one knows the exact date), the youngest and least mature member of the skiffle group. He idolised John. John was the macho, dominant, strutting leader. George the callow boy. We all know John could be cruel, as he boasted later about his awful behaviour, making fun of cripples, drawing sick cartoons, saying horrible things. He clearly caused pain to many people who loved him - girls especially, but presumably also to George and perhaps even to Paul, his so-called best friends.

George had been invited into the group and eventually became greatly admired. Despite his tender years, he was an excellent guitarist, far better than John, who was probably quite jealous of his instrumental skills as well as his hard work and determination to improve them - something John could not always be bothered with.

The first six lines of George’s poem can therefore be read as referring to John. As for the last two lines, this could be George thinking, as many people did at the time, that John, for all his obvious originality, wouldn’t get anywhere in life - he’d muck around, end up dossing like his father Fred had done. John himself feared he hadn’t a hope of getting a normal job or earning a living. If, however, my revised interpretation of the poem is correct, then George was one person who did have faith in John.“ - Hunter Davies, The Guardian, 16 May 2009 [x]

July 26

It’s a frantic day! (sorry for the delayed update)

FIFTH HARMONY IS NOMINATED FOR A VMA! They’re up for “Best Collaboration” for Work From Home!


Check out their reactions to the huge news!

A video posted by Michael Costello (@michaelcostello) on Jul 26, 2016 at 11:27am PDT

Vote for the girls HERE! (use a US IP, unlimited voting, just change your emails!)


They’re up in their last day of rehearsals before tour!

MERCH


Look at the stage!

The girls are all very excited to show us what they have prepared:


They made their way to the first tour stop in the evening!

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