all the evidence

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They don’t care where they’re headed as long as they’re together~ (with that said, they’re probably going home)

[ Yannow fugo’s different suits, like, green fugo and red-pink fugo?

well, you know how strawberries change colours when rippening?

They go green-white-red [look at the image from right to left]

So, what I’m saying is:

This was fugo’s first suit, 

then before the red one he went through a white-suit phase that he destroyed all evidence from, bc white suits are already Ugly, imagine one with holes]

anonymous asked:

do you think theres any remote chance that the crew is going to pull ame/dot out of thin air? even after them having no meaningful interactions or even..talking to each other recently, im really paranoid about something happening between them

There’s just waaaay too much Lapidot evidence now imo, so I feel it’s gonna be Lapidot or nothing - especially if this whole “Lapis squeezes Peridot’s hand in the trailer” business turns out to be legit.

And even if it isn’t, A//me//dot just doesn’t make any sense from a storytelling point of view, in my opinion.  Just… no.  God, no.

I could be wrong, of course, but I truly don’t think we’ve got anything at all to be concerned about.  Absolutely all of the evidence (both in and out of canon) is firmly in our favour.

anonymous asked:

Look I love your blog and Naruto, but why're you so angry bout everything Kishi does? I get the whole 'i criticise it because I love it' thing, but I, even as a female, do not give a damn about the female characters' progress or any other characters', as long as there is a good story. Sakura is a widely hated character? big whoop. Side characters are misrepresented? big whoop. Whatever, it's fantasy. Kishi has flaws, but why do you act like he's the worst mangaka to ever exist?

Well first of all, I love to complain and I love to argue. Those are two hallmarks of my personality. I also love literary analysis and meta. There’s something very vindicating about seeing a problem, collecting all the evidence that proves it exists, and then presenting said evidence in easy-to-follow essay form - in this case on my blog. It’s cathartic. And I don’t just do this with Naruto either - I do it with everything. 

The problem is these flaws you’re saying you don’t care about compromise the quality of the story, at least for me. I hold the story to a certain standard because I’m invested in it and I want it to uphold the quality I know it’s capable of. When the writers make decisions that negatively effect the power of the story it’s disappointing and it bothers me. Then when I see other people spouting a bunch of shit about characters that’s easily refuted the kill bill sirens start going off in my head and the next minute I’m furiously typing in righteous anger. And I’m not saying I’m always right or anything, there are opinions I’ve posted on this blog in the past that don’t necessarily reflect my opinions today. But I just like it when people…..use their noodles before making me read things like “Sakura is useless and annoying” with my own two eyes. 

Also I don’t act like Kishimoto is the worst mangaka in the world but I also don’t really…..read any other mangas and this is a naruto blog so obviously my criticisms are going to be kishi-centric. I also have a lot of shit in my repertoire of “things the naruto franchise has done to disappoint me” that I could say about Ikemoto so my apologies if I haven’t been firing off enough of those. And like I know you mean well, but what exactly is it you like about my blog if meta criticizing the writing isn’t the kind of content you enjoy seeing? thatshinobilife dot tumblr dot com would not even be a url on my radar if I were in your position. 

I don’t care who you are, if you complain about the amount of attention Black Lives Matter and Black issues get you are antiblack. “But Native Americans!” “But Asians!” Shut up. Tearing down Black people does not help any other community. Yes it can be frustrating when issues you care about don’t get enough focus, but I promise it’s not Black people’s activism that’s getting in your way. Do your own work and don’t act entitled to what gains Black activists have achieved. You’re not as progressive or nice as you think you are if you’re willing to use Black people as a scapegoat.

me: why is jeremy shada always hinting at klance being canon, why did “good job samurai” and “heh like that” end in the oral embodiment of the winky emoji, why did the bonding moment happen, why was the soundtrack for the bonding moment titled “To Go Home” while the softest part of the song played as keith and lance stared into each other’s eyes, why is lance’s birthday on national elevator day AND why did the elevator scene even happen, why did the season 2 poster have lance winking at keith, why did keith feel a connection with blue when the other paladins have never felt connections with other lions except their own, why was keith so worried for lance when lance was in the healing pod after saving coran from the bomb in season 1, why did lance recognise keith only by his mullet, why is lance even growing a mullet in that season 3 sneak peak photo, why is lance piloting the red lion, why is—

dreamworks

Avatar Aang, Feminist Icon?

“Who’s your favorite character?” I hear that question come up a lot over Avatar: The Last Airbender, a show particularly near and dear to me. Iroh and Toph get tossed around a lot. Zuko is very popular. Sokka has his fans. But something I’ve noticed? Aang very rarely gets the pick. When he comes up, it’s usually in that “Oh, and also…” kind of way. Which is strange, I think, considering he’s the main character, the titular airbender, of the entire show.

I never really thought much about it until a couple weeks ago when I finished my annual re-watch of the series and found myself, for the first time, specifically focused on Aang’s arc. Somehow, I never really paid that much attention to him before. I mean sure, he’s front and center in most episodes, fighting or practicing or learning big spiritual secrets, and yet, he always feels a little overshadowed. Katara takes care of the group. Sokka makes the plans. Zuko has the big, heroic Joseph Campbell journey. Aang…goofs around. He listens and follows and plays with Momo. And yes, at the end his story gets bigger and louder, but even then I feel like a lot of it dodges the spotlight. And here’s why:

Avatar casts the least traditionally-masculine hero you could possibly write as the star of a fantasy war story. Because of that, we don’t see Aang naturally for everything he is, so we look elsewhere.

To show what I mean, I want to talk about some of the show’s other characters, and I want to start with Zuko. Zuko is the hero we’re looking for. He’s tall and hot and complicated. He perseveres in the face of constant setbacks. He uses two swords and shoots fire out of his hands. He trains with a wise old man on ship decks and mountaintops. Occasionally he yells at the sky. He’s got the whole 180-degree moral turn beat for beat, right down to the scars and the sins-of-the-father confrontation scene. And if you were going into battle, some epic affair with battalions of armor-clad infantry, Zuko is the man you’d want leading the charge, Aragorn style. We love Zuko. Because Zuko does what he’s supposed to do.

Now let’s look at Katara. Katara doesn’t do what she’s supposed to do. She doesn’t care about your traditionally gender dynamics because she’s too busy fighting pirates and firebenders, planning military operations with the highest ranking generals in the Earth Kingdom, and dismantling the entire patriarchal structure of the Northern Water Tribe. Somewhere in her spare time she also manages to become one of the greatest waterbenders in the world, train the Avatar, defeat the princess of the Fire Nation in the middle of Sozin’s Comet and take care of the entire rest of the cast for an entire year living in tents and caves. Katara is a badass, and we love that.

So what about Aang? When we meet Aang, he is twelve years old. He is small and his voice hasn’t changed yet. His hobbies include dancing, baking and braiding necklaces with pink flowers. He loves animals. He doesn’t eat meat. He despises violence and spends nine tenths of every fight ducking and dodging. His only “weapon” is a blunt staff, used more for recreation than combat. Through the show, Aang receives most of his training from two young women – Katara and Toph – whom he gives absolute respect, even to the point of reverence. When he questions their instruction, it comes from a place of discomfort or anxiety, never superiority. He defers to women, young women, in matters of strategy and combat. Then he makes a joke at his own expense and goes off to feed his pet lemur.

Now there’s a perfectly reasonable explanation for all this, and it’s the one that shielded Aang from the heroic limelight in my eyes for ten years. The reasoning goes like this: Aang is a child. He has no presumptuous authority complex, no masculinity anxiety, no self-consciousness about his preferred pastimes, because he’s twelve. He’s still the hero, but he’s the prepubescent hero, the hero who can’t lead the charge himself because he’s just not old enough. The problem is, that reasoning just doesn’t hold up when you look at him in the context of the rest of the show.

Let’s look at Azula. Aside from the Avatar himself, Zuko’s sister is arguably the strongest bender in the entire show. We could debate Toph and Ozai all day, but when you look at all Azula does, the evidence is pretty damning. Let’s make a list, shall we?

Azula completely mastered lightning, the highest level firebending technique, in her spare time on a boat, under the instruction of two old women who can’t even bend.

Azula led the drill assault on Ba Sing Sae, one of the most important Fire Nation operations of the entire war, and almost succeeded in conquering the whole Earth Kingdom.

Azula then bested the Kyoshi Warriors, one of the strongest non-bender fighting groups in the entire world, successfully infiltrated the Earth Kingdom in disguise, befriended its monarch, learned of the enemy’s most secret operation, emotionally manipulated her older brother, overthrew the captain of the secret police and did conquer the Earth Kingdom, something three Fire Lords, numerous technological monstrosities, and countless generals, including her uncle, failed to do in a century.

And she did this all when she was fourteen.

That last part is easy to forget. Azula seems so much her brother’s peer, we forget she’s the same age as Katara. And that means that when we first meet Azula, she’s only a year older than Aang is at the end of the series. So to dismiss Aang’s autonomy, maturity or capability because of his age is ridiculous, understanding that he and Azula could have been in the same preschool class.

We must then accept Aang for what he truly is: the hero of the story, the leader of the charge, who repeatedly displays restraint and meekness, not because of his age, not because of his upbringing, not because of some character flaw, but because he chooses too. We clamor for strong female characters, and for excellent reason. But nobody every calls for more weak male characters. Not weak in a negative sense, but weak in a sense that he listens when heroes talk. He negotiates when heroes fight. And when heroes are sharpening their blades, planning their strategies and stringing along their hetero love interests, Aang is making jewelry, feeding Appa, and wearing that flower crown he got from a travelling band of hippies. If all Aang’s hobbies and habits were transposed onto Toph or Katara, we’d see it as a weakening of their characters. But with Aang it’s cute, because he’s a child. Only it isn’t, because he’s not.

Even in his relationship with Katara, a landmark piece of any traditional protagonist’s identity, Aang defies expectations. From the moment he wakes up in episode one, he is infatuated with the young woman who would become his oldest teacher and closest friend. Throughout season one we see many examples of his puppy love expressing itself, usually to no avail. But there’s one episode in particular that I always thought a little odd, and that’s Jet.

In Jet, Katara has an infatuation of her own. The titular vigilante outlaw sweeps her off her feet, literally, with his stunning hair, his masterful swordsmanship and his apparent selflessness. You’d think this would elicit some kind of jealousy from Aang. There’s no way he’s ignorant of what’s happening, as Sokka sarcastically refers to Jet as Katara’s boyfriend directly in Aang’s presence, and she doesn’t even dispute it. But even then, we never see any kind of rivalry manifest in Aang. Rather, he seems in full support of it. He repeatedly praises Jet, impressed by his leadership and carefree attitude. Despite his overwhelming affection for Katara, he evaluates both her and Jet on their own merits as people. There is no sense of ownership or macho competition.

Contrast this with Zuko’s reaction to a similar scenario in season three’s The Beach. Zuko goes to a party with his girlfriend, and at that party he sees her talking to another guy. His reaction? Throwing the challenger into the wall, shattering a vase, yelling at Mai, and storming out. This may seem a little extreme, but it’s also what we’d expect to an extent. Zuko is being challenged. He feels threatened in his station as a man, and he responds physically, asserting his strength and dominance as best he can.

I could go on and on. I could talk about how the first time Aang trains with a dedicated waterbending master, he tries to quit because of sexist double standards, only changing his mind after Katara’s urging. I could talk about how Aang is cast as a woman in the Fire Nation’s propaganda theatre piece bashing him and his friends. Because in a patriarchal society, the worst thing a man can be is feminine. I could talk about the only times Aang causes any kind of real destruction in the Avatar state, it’s not even him, since he doesn’t gain control of the skill until the show’s closing moments. Every time he is powerless in his own power and guilt-ridden right after, until the very end when he finally gains control, and what does he do with all that potential? He raises the rivers, and puts the fires out.

Aang isn’t what he’s supposed to be. He rejects every masculine expectation placed on his role, and in doing so he dodges center stage of his own show. It’s shocking to think about how many times I just forgot about Aang. Even at the end, when his voice has dropped and his abs have filled in, we miss it. Zuko’s coronation comes and we cheer with the crowd, psyched to see our hero crowned. Then the Fire Lord shakes his head, gestures behind him and declares “the real hero is the Avatar.” It’s like he’s talking to us. “Don’t you get it?” he asks. “Did you miss it? This is his story. But you forgot that. Because he was small. And silly. And he hated fighting. And he loved to dance. Look at him,” Zuko seems to say. “He’s your hero. Avatar Aang, defier of gender norms, champion of self-identity, feminist icon.”

i love this part enough that i wasn’t satisfied with the slow panning up of the ‘camera’ - i decided to copy and paste the images together to show the whole thing at once. thought i’d post it here in case others felt the same way (and also so i can find it again)

Guess who’s going to Disney World this weekend?

What? No, not the Chocobros… Me.

(Prompto, sweetie, sit right in the boat or you’re gonna fall out.)

Full-View!

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Ven… He was here…

im not here to make friends, which is good because historically my friends are all idiots
why lance (probably) won’t be the red paladin, and also why keith (probably) won’t be the black paladin

alright, so, chances are you’ve watched and rewatched the season three trailer multiple times. or, at least, i have. in it, we see lance in both the blue lion and the red lion, and we also see keith in the black lion. 

Keep reading

the boys get bullied
Justin, Travis and Griffin McElroy
the boys get bullied

the more i think about [talented and gifted], it was more of like a wedgie quarantine. like, these kids are not gonna survive. they are not gonna make it to middle school and we can’t lose another one.

from mbmbam 259: birthday surprise hole!~

The types as movie characters/plot
  • ESFP: The fun and outgoing main character that gets warped into a dramatic quest to fight off bad guys and save their best friend
  • ENFP: The hopelessly romantic princess with the over protective parents. Ends up running away in order to follow her dreams which disguising as a peasant.
  • ESTP: The hero that gets to finally show off their amazing skills from years of combat training. They save the town from destruction (and get the girl/boy)
  • ENTP: The asshole type character that tries hard to be disliked, but for some reason, you can't not like them. They end up learning some kind of moral lesson about love
  • ESFJ: The backbone of a family under the apocalypse. They are second-in-command and can be very vicious when their loved ones are hurt. Was probably a doctor as well.
  • ENFJ: The main character that sacrifices themselves too easily for their friends. They end up somehow not dying due to one of their friends pushing them out of the way. ENFJ lives on to be a ruler of some kind.
  • ESTJ: The lawyer character which has to help their best friend cover up some deep dark shit they did. Using wits and skilful people skills, they help their friend escape the law
  • ENTJ: A heart-wrenching story about an underprivileged child and their journey on to becoming a CEO of a huge modern company. Probably a documentary or biography
  • ISFP: A character that everyone thinks is dissociated from society, but ends up being the only one who can soften up the coldest character in the movie. They undergo a heart-warming friendship filled with metaphors and a tragic end.
  • INFP: The main character that discovers they have incredible super powers. Spends the whole movie getting away from the government and saving their friends.
  • ISTP: Probably that character that loses their family or friends during a disaster. Goes on an epic journey to be reunited with them again
  • INTP: Part of a space crew on a futuristic mission to explore the galaxy. The film focuses on realistic problems that a colonising ship would have and showcases the brilliant minds of engineers
  • ISFJ: A heart-warming romantic comedy about two tragic lovers. But there's some kind of twist like a supernatural occurrence separated them or something
  • INFJ: Some kind of fantasy journey with dragons and weird monsters. Ends up being some kind of psychological thriller with a cliff hanger.
  • ISTJ: A character that underwent some tragic event. Used this event to better themselves for mankind. Leads a double life as a successful person and a vigilante (Basically Batman.)
  • INTJ: That main character that everyone suspects is the murderer in a horror movie. Becomes the last one alive. Is actually the killer and at the end narrates how they succeeded. Ends on a cliff hangar hinting that they got rid of all evidence except for one.