all the awards for this woman

anonymous asked:

Yes on the Noora thing. I know so many people are annoyed on how much screen time she is getting this season but I think the way Julie is telling Sana's story by having Noora as a contrast is so smart. Seriously that woman deserves all of the awards.

100% It’s amazing isn’t it?

I didn’t even realise how much alike Sana and Noora are until this season. And that’s the point. 

they both don’t drink, both aren’t the party type and they both spent the same amount of time with the pm girls 

yeeeeeet

they are treated completely differently. 

and that is the harsh truth in this society. We are all judged based on appearances, our religion, our gender, our race, our sexuality. 

even though in reality we are all the same, we all have hopes, dreams and people we love, we still get treated differently. 

and Julie is showing us this by introducing Noora as the focus in Sana’s narrative. 

Noora is very much like Sana, hell some might even consider her, as her mirror. 

but for some reason she continues to be treated differently and accepted easily when Sana isn’t. 

it sucks

but it is a lesson I am so happy Julie is teaching <3 

anonymous asked:

Why are you so anti La La Land?

I’m not anti-La La Land at all. I have nothing against it, it’s a cute movie and all. I just feel like movies like Moonlight are more deserving of all of the awards that La La Land has been sweeping up this awards season.

The reason why I want Moonlight to win so bad is because of its story. To have a movie about an African-American boy struggling with his sexuality while growing up is something I thought would never happen. It’s touching and relatable because it’s something that I went through growing up and to see someone that looks like me going through what I went through during my whole childhood really strikes a chord with me. Growing up African-American and gay is difficult because the stigma of showing yourself as weak or feminine is something still looked down upon in the African-American community if you’re a boy. You have to act as masculine as you can to prove yourselves to others or else you would get teased or picked on. Barry Jenkins telling of Chiron’s story through Moonlight paints a story of millions of African American males childhoods. Not only African American males but also other males of color as well.

When you compare that to a musical about a white woman wanting to be an actress and a white man wanting to save jazz, a genre deeply rooted in African-American culture and from slavery…she just doesn’t have the range compared to Moonlight, I’m sorry.

But none of this really matters anyway because we all know that La La Land is going to sweep at the Oscars just like it did with all the other major award shows this season so

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Constance Wu on Twitter: Men who sexually harass women [for an Oscar]! [Because] good acting performance matters more than humanity, human integrity! [Because] poor kid [really] needs the help!

@TheAcademy congrats on not learning from the past! Congrats on reinforcing the BTS mistreatment of women in [Hollywood]! Who cares [right]? Go Casey!

Boys! BUY [your] way out of trouble by settling out of court! Just do a good acting job, [that’s] all that matters! [Because] Art isn’t about humanity, right?

Here’s a thing I wrote during an convo w/ @PeterShinkoda about how Casey Affleck’s win will be a nod to Trump’s.

Right, he’s not running for Prez. He’s running for an award that honors a craft whose purpose is examining the dignity of the human experience & young women are deeply human. The absence of awards doesn’t diminish a great performance. That’s on the page, or screen, as it were… and the opportunity to even DO the part is a tremendous honor in and of itself. But the choices an awarding committee makes DOES increase the dignity of an award and brings light to the pursuit our craft seeks to honor. It signifies said committee’s awareness of the harmful oversights it may have unknowingly participated in the past, and the respect and dignity to learn from the past, not repeat it and not to use it as an excuse to reinforce the industry’s gross and often hidden mistreatment of women. Art doesn’t exist for the sake of awards, but awards do exist to honor all that art is trying to accomplish in life. So context matters. Because in acting, human life matters. It’s why art exists. I know it’s just an award but I guess I’m in this career, not for awards, but because the treatment of human life matters to me. So I stand the fuck up for it.

I’ve been counseled not to talk about this for career’s sake. F my career then, I’m a woman & human first. That’s what my craft is built on.

  • What she says: I'm fine
  • What she means: LIN MANUEL MIRANDA WROTE A BEAUTIFUL SONG ABOUT A YOUNG WOMAN FROM A RARELY REPRESENTED HERITAGE TAKING CHARGE OF HER OWN LIFE AND JOURNEY. THE AWARD SHOW HYPED HIM UP AND WERE ALL ROOTING FOR HIM. INSTEAD THE AWARD WENT TO LA LA LAND A TRIBUTE TO LA, A MOVIE TRIBUTE TO HOLLYWOOD, JAZZ AND LA WITHOUT ANY HISPANIC OR ENOUGH BLACK REPRESENTATION. LA LA LAND IS PRETTY AND FUN AND INSPIRING BUT NOT ~BOLD~ AND NOT THE KIND WE NEED. WHAT WAS GOING ON IN THEIR HEADS. LIN MANUEL MIRANDA AND DISNEY WERE ROBBED.
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This is Chaka Khan appreciation. Without Chaka, we might never have heard of the (still-underrated) Rufus. We would’ve never had Kanye’s “Through The Wire.” We would’ve just missed so much. Whether you call here Yvette Marie Stevens (her birth name) or Chaka Adunne Aduffe Hodarhi Karifi (adding the Khan after marriage), the name she received when she became a member of the Black Panther Party and friends with Fred Hampton, you’d have to acknowledge that lovers of music owe her so much. 11 solo albums. Another 11 with Rufus. A career that spans more than 42 years. 10 Grammy Awards. 22 Grammy Nominations. When you look at this pictures, know that you’re looking at greatness. I mean, even after all that, she’s so bad that a 60-plus-year-old Chaka Khan looks like a lot like a 31 year old Nicki Minaj. (You’ve been told: it don’t crack.)  Her beauty, her hair, the face, the energy, the presence–these things would define a mere mortal. But Chaka is no mere mortal: she is every woman, and her musical and artistic accomplishments are so great that even her beauty cannot distract you from her talent for long. She’s been quoted as saying, “I’ve always struggled so much just to appreciate myself.” That one quote explains so much. But Chaka–Yvette– and this is no substitute, but you should know: we appreciate you, for who you are and what you’ve done. Let me tell you something good: you are one of the best ever to do it. Chicago stand up. Everybody stand up.

Miley Cyrus bastardized and profited from hood culture, and when she was done, went back to her lily white lilypad. White women are always rewarded redemption regardless of the rebellious phases that they go through. They can make a “mistake” and when it’s all said and done the white community will still let them back in with open arms.

The black community is the exact opposite. Black women are not awarded the benefit of the doubt. We can’t make mistakes and rely on our community to receive us with open arms. If a black woman slips up and gets pregnant by a “thug” or goes through a “promiscuous” phase, she is damned forever. Look at Ciara. To this day, Ciara can’t breathe without the fuckboy coalition bringing up Future. Blac Chyna will always be the DC stripper, even though she is no longer a stripper and she is now a successful business woman. Karrueche’s success will always be overlooked because Chris Brown and his brigrade wont leave her be. Black women have to walk around with a scarlet letter because the black community does not believe that we are worthy of redemption.

Thats the main reason why I practice #blackgirlsolidarity. Non-black women don’t get it and they never will. Becky and Consuela and nem can twerk on stage and sing about getting higher than 100° F. Black women can not. We don’t have that privilege of going through a “phase”. We have to sit down with our hands between our thighs in fear of being ostrasized for any mistake that we make. So Miley can get the fuck on. I don’t know her…

Creator of #OscarsSoWhite isn’t taking credit for this year’s historic wins

  • For an awards ceremony that’s been rightfully derided in recent years for refusing to acknowledge the work of artists of color, Sunday night’s show was an important step in the right direction.
  • But April Reign, the woman who coined the phrase #OscarsSoWhite, the hashtag that encapsulated that criticism, isn’t taking all the credit.
  • She’s underscoring an important point. #OscarsSoWhite highlighted an enduring problem in Hollywood, namely that filmmakers and actors of color weren’t recognized for their achievements by the industry at large. 
  • That fed into a lack of representation that has real consequences, ranging from young kids’ self-esteem to policy making
  • But at its very core, the goal of diversifying representation in Hollywood is to allow the work of artists of color to be judged on the same platform as white people’s art. 
  • In the case of Moonlight’s wins, it shows that the stories of black boys are important and worthy of being told. And in this political climate, that’s more important than ever. Read more (2/27/17 9:13 AM)

follow @the-movemnt

Bea Gaddy knew what it was like to be down on her luck. Coming from a family of domestic violence, Bea went between low-paying jobs to homelessness and living on welfare. Her luck took a turn for the better in 1981 when she purchased a 50-cent lottery ticket and won $290. Instead of spending this on herself, she decided she would feed the hungry on Thanksgiving. This would become known as the “Thanks for Giving” feast and year after year, people were touched by Bea’s kindness and would follow in her footsteps.

The “Thanks for Giving” feast was first held on a sidewalk with Bea providing and cooking all of the food. With the popularity growing, more and more diners wanted to attend and local grocers and farms started to provide food. Over the forthcoming years, Bea was awarded with a number of awards including Unsung Hero Award, Afro American Woman of the Year and Baltimore City Council Award. She passed away on 3 October, 2001, due to breast cancer.

4

Ava DuVernay announces queer directors Cheryl Dunye and Aurora Guerrero for ‘Queen Sugar’

  • Filmmaker Ava DuVernay made headlines when she hired all-female directors for the first season of Queen Sugar
  • And now, she’s making even more: 
  • Two of the directors for the show’s 2nd season, Cheryl Dunye and Aurora Guerrero, are award-winning filmmakers and also queer women of color.
  • Dunye is a black lesbian filmmaker best known for the 1996 film The Watermelon Woman, the first feature film directed by a black lesbian.
  • Guerrero is a queer Chicana filmmaker whose 2012 feature Mosquita y Mari follows two high school girls who fall in love with one another while navigating life in Latino Los Angeles. Read more (3/20/17 11:30 AM)

follow @the-movemnt

Suck it, ya filthy, fake Redcoat!

LTL, FTP and all that Jazz. Compared to some of the stories here mine is fairly tame, but considering my age at the time, the effort I had put into the whole affair and the resulting payoff, I would consider this pro enough to fit in here.

I’ve lived in Germany almost my entire life, yet through a twist of fate, I grew up learning the English language as a native speaker, since my father emigrated to Germany from the USA. As such, I’ve always had an American accent when speaking English and I’ve never met anyone who thought they felt the need to complain about it. Every time a teacher asked why I spoke English so well I replied that I am a US National by birth because my Father is from the US. All my teachers seemed quite impressed, except this one Hag, half a lifetime ago… If there ever was an award for creepy Anglophilia, she’d be neck deep in honors and certificates. Instead of encouraging me to speak more so that the other students could learn proper pronunciation from an actual native speaker, like many other English teachers at my school back then did, this woman thought it necessary to berate me for “speaking in such a horrible and filthy manner” and “cure [me] of that insufferable atrocity of an accent.” Mind you, these were actual quotes from this woman. My dad was no help at all. He was fairly ignorant about me being bullied by one of my own teachers, and even went so far as to yell at me to “suck it up and respect my elders”. So, yeah, I stuck it up. It didn’t help that I also wrote in American English (you know, color instead of color, tire instead of tyre, cookie instead of biscuit, that sort of thing) and the Hag had the audacity to write these “mistakes” up as double errors, meaning I got twice points deducted for spelling errors that weren’t even actual errors! I was so fed up with this woman and it wasn’t even two months into the school year.

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Here are some LGBT movies I’ve watched !!

Top picks (in alphabetical order)

Big Eden (2000)
Gay artist Henry moves from NYC to small hometown to take care of sick grandfather. A really sweet, heartwarming story. Bonus points for no homophobia (!!) plot line & a gay native american man, Pike, who is adorable and crushes on Henry.

Brokeback Mountain (2005)
Who hasn’t seen this? Two shepherds and their tumultuous love story over the years. 

But I’m a Cheerleader (1999)
Girl gets sent to a boot camp meant to alter her sexuality. Funny and aesthetic and really cheesy but worth the watch.

Carol (2015)
A young woman in her 20s, Therese Belivet is a clerk working in a Manhattan department store and dreaming of a more fulfilling life when she meets Carol, an alluring woman trapped in a loveless, convenient marriage. 

First Girl I Loved (2016)
Girl falls in love with the most popular girl from her school. Bonus points for a nuanced and realistic portrayal of teenagers.

The Way He Looks (Hoje Eu Quero Voltar Sozinho, 2014)
Brazilian coming-of-age drama about a blind boy who falls in love with his classmate. Based on a short film called “I don’t want to go back alone”, which you can find on youtube.

Holding The Man (2015)
In the 1970s, two teen boys in Australia fight all obstacles thrown their way and refuse to renounce the love they feel for each other. Based on Australia’s “most famous gay biography”.

I Killed My Mother (J’ai Tué Ma Mère, 2009) 
Biographical drama. Directorial debut of Quebecois actor Xavier Dolan, which he also wrote, produced and starred in. My favourite film by him.

Kill Your Darlings (2013)
Biographical drama/thriller. A murder in 1944 draws together the great poets of the beat generation. Peep Daniel Radcliffe and Dane DeHaan.

Laurence Anyways (2012)
A drama that charts ten years in the relationship of a transgender woman’s relationship with her lover. Directed by Xavier Dolan.

Maurice (1987)
The story of a gay man in the early 20th century. A really sweet film with bonus points for being a gay period drama that - spoilers - has a happy ending.

Moonlight (2016) (see title card)
A chronicle of the childhood, adolescence and burgeoning adulthood of a young black man growing up in a rough neighborhood of Miami. First lgbt film (and film with all-black cast) to win Best Picture at the Academy Awards 2017.

Pride (2014)
U.K. gay activists work to help miners during their lengthy strike of the National Union of Mineworkers in the summer of 1984. A truly feel-good movie every one should watch.

The Handmaiden (2016)
A woman is hired as a handmaiden to a Japanese heiress, but secretly she is involved in a plot to defraud her. It’s been called a “South Korean Gothic Lesbian Revenge Thriller”. Just watch it. Trust me. 

The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975)
A cult-classic and must-watch. Need I say more?


Rest of movies in alphabetical order under cut, with some commentary by yrs truly (me. a gay.)

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me when my horoscope is right

youtube

“Life is better when you share the ride.”

“June” is the story of a woman who becomes more connected to her community through ridesharing. Chromosphere was approached by Academy Award-winning director John Kahrs and Lyft to provide complete design and animation services for this project. We worked directly with John from the earliest concept designs through to the final frames, making sure that everything we did enhanced the story that he wanted to tell.

In the beginning we see only a small slice of the world around June in Chicago’s southside, but by the end we are taken on a whirlwind journey through all of Chicago’s diverse and colorful neighborhoods. For visualizing these environments we first tapped designer Théo Guignard whose rich color sensibilities brought out the beauty in every single place June visits.

One of our biggest challenges was to design, build, and rig June, our central character. She needed to be appealing and fit in with our graphic style, but also have the ability to exhibit subtle emotions. For her design, as well as all of the other characters in the film, we enlisted Tiffany Ford to capture her personality. Tiffany’s designs have an authentic and specific feel that is often hard to come by in mainstream animation.

To bring the characters to life we had to assemble a team of animators who could embrace the visual style of the short and also understand the subtlety of acting required to make the piece feel authentic. Leading this team was Nelson Boles, who lent his extremely sophisticated sensibilities to June’s movements and facial expressions.

The final product is a vibrant mix of 2D and 3D assembled by our skilled team of international compositors and animators. We’re incredibly proud to have been a part of this beautiful project. Check out our full production credits below:

CREATIVE DIRECTOR
Kevin Dart

DIRECTOR OF PRODUCTION
Myles Shioda

DESIGN
Théo Guignard
Arthur Chaumay
Tiffany Ford
Jasmin Lai
Emily Paik
Sylvia Liu

CG
Pedro Vergani
Feed Me Light: Felipe Hansen, Denis Bodart, Denis Bouyer, Richard Kazuo Maegaki
Mattias Bjurström
Theresa Latzko

ANIMATION
Nelson Boles
Claudio Salas
Alex Grigg
Jonathan Djob Nkondo
Bill Northcott
Vitaliy Strokous

LIGHTING & RENDERING
Camille Perrin

COMPOSITING
Stéphane Coëdel
Rob Ward
H. Kristen Campbell
Alasdair Brotherston

ADDITIONAL HELP FROM
Nate Funaro
Keiko Murayama
Rachel Chu
Jim Levasseur

To be honest, I was bothered by Jacob and Queenie being a couple, because it uses that average-looking-guy gets the most-stunning-woman-around trope that I hate. It’s supposed to make you think that love sees no appearances, that the internal beauty is what really matters and so on. But have you noticed how that never happens the other way around?? How it’s never the average-looking-girl with the most-gorgeous-guy? I see those couples in movies and all I see is they telling boys to think women are prizes and every guy should expect being awarded a pretty one if they’re nice, because they deserve no less. Had they make Jacob the model-worthy gorgeous and Queenie the average-looking and people would probably be calling this couple “unlikely” instead of “cute”, I promise you.