all of these looked better in photoshop

anonymous asked:

do you have an idea of a checklist for learning how to create digital art? like i know practice is essential, but i don't really know where to start or where to go from there. thanks so much xox

I think I can toss some stuff out here that might be of use.  Assuming an artist learning digital art starts from the beginning–owning a tablet & drawing program but not knowing how to use them–here’s an inconveniently long list of stuff that could help them.

TL;DR: 1, mess around till you’re used to drawing digitally. 2, study and create ad infinitum. 3, a bunch of tips that are pretty hard to TLDR so you should probably just go over em.  Step 2 is basically what you asked me NOT to tell you (“practice”!), but unfortunately it’s all I know how to do :,(

1) If you own a tablet that you plug into your computer (i.e., you don’t draw directly on the screen), feel free to spend a few weeks or even a month+ just getting used to it.  When you first start out, it’s really freaky drawing in one place and seeing things appear somewhere else, but trust me in that you won’t even notice the disconnect after a few months of consistent digital drawing.  I’ve been painting digitally for about 2 years now, and it’s actually slightly easier for me to draw digitally than traditionally.  [If you have a cintiq, or you use an iPad with Procreate, or something similar, then you probably don’t have to spend as much time in step 1.]

Keep in mind that it doesn’t matter how good you were with traditional drawing when you start digital; the mental disconnect you have will make it very difficult to think about proportions, values, edges, colors, etc.  You’ll probably notice yourself making mistakes that you wouldn’t normally make on paper.  Don’t worry about them, just keep drawing as you usually would.  Digital you will catch up to traditional you in time.  

For now, get used to blending colors, drawing somewhat steady lines that go in the correct direction, and fooling around with brushes and brush settings.  If you come across a brush that you like (easy to work with + pleasing results), it may help to stick with it as you continue to learn.  Digital doodles and sketches are good for this stage; though try to keep doing traditional work so your base art skills don’t atrophy.  

If you’re just starting out with Photoshop or Sai or Krita or whatever software you’re using, you’re gonna be intimidated by all the funky buttons and settings that you first see.  If it makes you feel any better, I use maybe 0.1% of the tools that Photoshop offers me.  When you start, all you need to worry about is the brush tool and control-z, maybe the eraser too.

2) Do studies as well as pieces from imagination.  You can move into step 2 as early as you please; you don’t have to wait until you think you’ve become “skillful” at digital drawing (in fact, this step is what will probably help you become the most comfortable with digital).  It’s alright if your colors are icky looking and your values are off (tip, occasionally turn the saturation of your drawing to 0 to check the values), because as long as you keep studying reality and appealing art & continually learn from your mistakes, you’ll get better. 

Always remember to study or at least appreciate the qualities of art you enjoy.  It’s the same thing that people always tell writers–you have to read a lot to write well.  You probably shouldn’t shield yourself from the influence of other artists; while you may think that this action would help you develop artistically in the manner most true to yourself, in reality the vast majority of the process of learning art will be honing in on what you find visually pleasant so that you may, in turn, express your artistic taste in your work.  If you look at other people’s art, you can pick out tiny aspects of it that you like and incorporate that into your style.  It’s a bit trickier to build a style without the “help” of other artists, though you can always turn to nature for help. On that note, I also recommend referencing nature as much as you can, because we as human beings are sort of wired to find natural designs, colors, and structures beautiful.  Look at nature for the universally beautiful, and look at art for the subjectively beautiful (i.e., enjoyed uniquely by you).

If you find yourself getting burnt out pretty quickly, then just paint/draw simple and small things for period of half an hour to 1 ½ hours a day (and switch back to traditional).  You can spend this time mapping out proportions, creating thumbnails of values/colors, drawing linework, or whatever.  Add complexity to your pieces as the months go by, and if you already have a decent foundation in drawing aim to create somewhat finished pieces after maybe four months to a year.  Please note that the second part of that sentence was something I completely made up out of my head, because I’m trying to quantify pretty unquantifiable concepts such as a “decent foundation in drawing” and a “somewhat finished” piece of art.  If you find it unrealistic, or just too easy of a goal, disregard it entirely.  It can take you half a decade to learn to make finished digital art, or you can get it down in a couple months.

3) Fun fact, there’s not really a step 3 as you stay in 2 forever, always studying and creating.  But there’s a few other things about digital art that you ought to know, so here they are:

• If your computer doesn’t make a fuss about it, I’d recommend working on a decently large canvas (at least 3000 by 3000; I personally prefer 6000 by 6000). You’ll get less defined edges and colors if you go below 1000 by 1000, from my experience.

• If you have a tablet with pressure sensitivity (you probably should otherwise digital painting is kinda hellish), go to your brush settings and set ‘transfer’ to ‘pen pressure.’  This is what makes it possible to blend.  

• If you’re having trouble matching colors while studying, you can always color pick the ref (in photoshop: bring the pic into PS and use the eye dropper tool) and compare its colors to your colors.  Some people add too much red to their skin tones, some people draw their highlights with overly desaturated colors, some people make trees and grass in their landscapes too green; whatever the case, take note of and correct errors that you consistently make.  

• Get used to using the transform/warp/liquify tools (liquify is technically a filter but you get what I mean).  They’re lifesavers for fixing proportion mistakes that you’ve only noticed 8 hours into a piece. 

• Give layers a shot.  I only work on one layer, but I’ve heard from people who divide their piece up into multiple layers that they’re damn useful (until you draw on the wrong one). 

• Flip your canvas horizontally every once in a while to make sure stuff hasn’t gone awry. 

• Screw around with color modes; they can do some really fancy things that are difficult to duplicate with normal digital painting, let alone traditional.  On the topic of colors, don’t be afraid to use somewhat desaturated colors (near the center of the color picker square in PS). There are some very aesthetically pleasing color combinations that you can make out of somewhat dulled colors.

• If you’re using PS, bind ‘step backward’ to control Z, not ‘undo.’  This is under keyboard shortcuts.  Set up a bunch of shortcuts that are the most convenient for you–personally, I only keep my left hand near the lower left region of my keyboard (my right hand is away from the keyboard and off to the right, drawing on the tablet), so I have all of my necessary shortcuts in that area.

This was a bit longer than I expected, but I figure that someone out there can get something out of it.  Cheers to you, if you do.

4

Ships page is finally up!

Go to my blog and click Ships (shown in the first picture), then you choose one of the characters in your ship (second picture) and then there’s a list of ships. Click on the ship you’re looking for and it goes to that tag on my blog. I’m working on better icons but photoshop isnt my best skill.

I also have a page up for heroes

if you’re just trying to find any and all posts when one specific character.

3

Trouble, trouble, trouble.

100 Photography Tips - Eric Kim

I read this multiple times a week.

1. Just because someone has an expensive camera doesn’t mean that they’re a good photographer.
2. Always shoot in RAW. Always.
3. Prime lenses help you learn to be a better photographer.
4. Photo editing is an art in itself
5. The rule of thirds works 99% of the time.
6. Macro photography isn’t for everybody.
7. UV filters work just as well as lens caps.
8. Go outside and shoot photos rather than spending hours a day on photography forums.
9. Capture the beauty in the mundane and you have a winning photograph.
10. Film isn’t better than digital.
11. Digital isn’t better than film.
12. There is no “magic” camera or lens.
13. Better lenses don’t give you better photos.
14. Spend less time looking at other people’s work and more time shooting your own.
15. Don’t take your DSLR to parties.
16. Being a photographer is sexy.
17. Making your photos b/w doesn’t automatically make them “artsy”
18. People will always discredit your work if you tell them you “photoshop” your images. Rather, tell them that you process them in the “digital darkroom”.
19. You don’t need to take a photo of everything.
20. Have at least 2 backups of all your images. Like they say in war, two is one, one is none.
21. Ditch the neck strap and get a handstrap.
22. Get closer when taking your photos, they often turn out better.
23. Be a part of a scene while taking a photo; not a voyeur.
24. Taking a photo crouched often make your photos look more interesting.
25. Worry less about technical aspects and focus more on compositional aspects of photography.
26. Tape up any logos on your camera with black gaffers tape- it brings a lot less attention to you.
27. Always underexpose by 2/3rds of a stop when shooting in broad daylight.
28. The more photos you take, the better you get.
29. Don’t be afraid to take several photos of the same scene at different exposures, angles, or apertures.
30. Only show your best photos.
31. A point-and-shoot is still a camera.
32. Join an online photography forum.
33. Critique the works of others.
34. Think before you shoot.
35. A good photo shouldn’t require explanation (although background information often adds to an image). *
36. Alcohol and photography do not mix well.
37. Draw inspiration from other photographers but never worship them.
38. Grain is beautiful.
39. Ditch the photo backpack and get a messenger bag. It makes getting your lenses and camera a whole lot easier.
40. Simplicity is key.
41. The definition of photography is: “painting with light.” Use light in your favor.
42. Find your style of photography and stick with it.
43. Having a second monitor is the best thing ever for photo processing.
44. Silver EFEX pro is the best b/w converter.
45. Carry your camera with you everywhere. Everywhere.
46. Never let photography get in the way of enjoying life.
47. Don’t pamper your camera. Use and abuse it.
48. Take straight photos.
49. Shoot with confidence.
50. Photography and juxtaposition are best friends.
51. Print out your photos big. They will make you happy.
52. Give your photos to friends.
53. Give them to strangers.
54. Don’t forget to frame them.
55. Costco prints are cheap and look great.
56. Go out and take photos with (a) friend(s).
57. Join a photo club or start one for yourself.
58. Photos make great presents.
59. Taking photos of strangers is thrilling.
60. Candid>Posed.
61. Natural light is the best light.
62. 35mm (on full frame) is the best “walk-around” focal length.
63. Don’t be afraid to bump up your ISO when necessary.
64. You don’t need to always bring a tripod with you everywhere you go (hell, I don’t even own one).
65. It is always better to underexpose than overexpose.
66. Shooting photos of homeless people in an attempt to be “artsy” is exploitation.
67. You will find the best photo opportunities in the least likely situations.
68. Photos are always more interesting with the human element included.
69. You can’t “photoshop” bad images into good ones.
70. Nowadays everybody is a photographer.
71. You don’t need to fly to Paris to get good photos; the best photo opportunities are in your backyard.
72. People with DSLRS who shoot portraits with their grip pointed downwards look like morons.
73. Cameras as tools, not toys.
74. In terms of composition, photography and painting aren’t much different.
75. Photography isn’t a hobby- it’s a lifestyle.
76. Make photos, not excuses.
77. Be original in your photography. Don’t try to copy the style of others.
78. The best photographs tell stories that begs the viewer for more.
79. Any cameras but black ones draw too much attention.
80. The more gear you carry around with you the less you will enjoy photography.
81. Good self-portraits are harder to take than they seem.
82. Laughter always draws out peoples’ true character in a photograph.
83. Don’t look suspicious when taking photos- blend in with the environment.
84. Landscape photography can become dull after a while.
85. Have fun while taking photos.
86. Never delete any of your photos.
87. Be respectful when taking photos of people or places.
88. When taking candid photos of people in the street, it is easier to use a wide-angle than a telephoto lens.
89. Travel and photography are the perfect pair.
90. Learn how to read a histogram.
91. A noisy photo is better than a blurry one.
92. Don’t be afraid to take photos in the rain.
93. Learn how to enjoy the moment, rather than relentlessly trying to capture the perfect picture of it.
94. Never take photos on an empty stomach.
95. You will discover a lot about yourself through your photography.
96. Never hoard your photographic insight- share it with the world.
97. Never stop taking photos
98. Photography is more than simply taking photos, it is a philosophy of life
99. Capture the decisive moment
100. Write your own list.

10

I’m so in love with you
And I hope you know
Darling, your love is more
Than worth its weight in gold
We’ve come so far my dear
Look how we’ve grown
And I wanna stay with you
Until we’re grey and old

To: @lydias-martin . Happy birthday, baby.

I’ve got my swim trunks, and my flippie-floppies

for @legividivici, hope you like it!! <3 (ao3)


The last place Clarke expected to run into anyone she knows is the literal middle of the ocean, but the cruise ship has barely left port before she spots a familiar head of tousled curls ahead of her in the crowd.

She loses sight of him before she can get a good look, so she chalks it up to her imagination. It’s entirely possible that Bellamy is on the same cruise she is– they did, after all, both just graduate, and therefore have the same budget and scheduling constraints– but she tells herself it probably isn’t him. And that even if it is him, it’s not like they’re going to run into each other.

So of course the next day she’s on one of the decks by the pool when a shadow falls over her and his voice says, “Is this chair taken?”

Clarke pushes her sunglasses up on top of her head and wrinkles her nose at him.

“I don’t know, I my tiara really ought to have a chair of its own.”

Bellamy smirks and sits on the edge of the chair, not moving her stuff– not yet– but settling in to bicker with her. As is their custom.

She and Bellamy were RAs in the same dorm two years ago, and they had differing ideas at first about how hands-on they needed to be with their freshmen. Despite the way they picked at each other, by the end of the year they’d become reluctant allies, his calling her ‘Princess’ taking on less of a sneer and more of a teasing edge, her comebacks laced with a smile. They had each other’s backs.

But she didn’t re-up her RA contract for her senior year, and he did, and they’re not the type of friends to outright admit they miss each other, so she hasn’t seen nearly as much of him in the past couple of semesters as she would like.

“You here with Wells?”

“And Raven,” she nods. “I was saving those seats for them, but I’m pretty sure they ditched me to have tiny cabin sex.”

“O and Lincoln ditched me pretty fast too. I think they’ve all forfeited their right to a saved seat,” he grins, passing her bag back to her. The way he lounges back in the chair, skin already browning, wind ruffling his hair, he looks like something straight out of an ad. Or Clarke’s fantasies. Either one, really.

Just because she used to think he was a Class-A dick (which he is, but not in the way she thought. In the fun way.) doesn’t mean she’s never noticed how great his hands are, or how he’s got perfect hair for pulling, or how there’s probably more than one way to wipe a smirk off his face.

“Sure, make yourself at home,” she grumbles. He grins at her and pulls his shirt off, which is– honestly just so unfair.

“Don’t mind if I do.”

Keep reading

2

HEY who wants shitty cell phone progress photos? Well here they are anyway. Mainly because I’m excited about it. >v>; I had’t put all the pieces together till today so I’m happy that it’s looking good! The knees (for now) work, but they’re annoying to put on so I didn’t bother for now. Photoshopped in the tattoo cause why not, and I’m not about to waste one of the real ones on a dress rehearsal. I’ll get better photos at the actual con and/or when the bow is done. This is probably 99% complete with time to spare to help my friend do his Mercy.

Also, yes, I added the D.Va selfie pose cause it occurred to me that maybe the first time I show my actual face around here I shouldn’t look like I want to murder the world. >_>;

A Beginner’s Guide to Prepping for Print

The Studioblr Collective | September 23rd, 2016

One of the most intimidating aspects of graphic design I was introduced to in school was preparing and sending my work to print. Before university I was used to just printing things as is on my tiny home printer or the closest photo studio, but in just the first month alone we were introduced to the so much new info on how to make sure our designs actually look like how we want them to.

Your graphics, typography, layouts etc may be amazing but they will all be rather ruined if the printed product comes out looking nothing like you want and there’s sadly no undo option for a bad print job.

CMYK not RGB:  A lot of the colours one creates in RGB are not achievable using standard four-colour process printing. In Photoshop you can easily switch to this mode via the Image>mode>CMYK color menu command to give you a more accurate representation of how your colours will print; but, it is always best to create your document from the start in CMYK colour mode to ensure you have a better idea of how your colours are going to print.

Resolution: Make sure all graphics in your print layout are sufficient quality for printing. 300 DPI is the preferred minimum resolution for print graphics. When working with low resolution images that cannot be avoided, lowering the scale of the image improves the quality slightly.

Print Layout: Used extensively in programs like InDesign:

  1. Trim Line: The finished size of the piece.
  2. Live Area: The area that is considered safe to keep any important information within ( if a graphics trim size in 8.25” x 10.25”, the live area might be 7.27” x 9.75”, this takes into consideration binding if the page is placed on the left or right of a spread, since you don’t want the graphic to be cut-off)
  3. Bleed Area: While the minimum bleed areas for a printed piece is 0.125” (⅛ of an inch), you may sometimes be required to use more than that. The bleed allows for elements at the edge of the live area to be extended out so as to ensure there is no space between where the graphic ends and where the paper is cut.
  4. Crop Marks: Indicates where to cut the paper.

File Formats: While most printers will accept multiple formats like TIFF and PDF, save all your files as PDF when handing them over to compress file sizes.

Rich Black vs 100K Black: When printing in colour, there are two different shades of black you can use:

  • Black – 100 K: Can be used for body copy and barcodes (looks a bit washed out in large blocks of print)
  • Rich Black – 40 C 40 M 40 Y 100 K: Should be used when using blocks of black

Ensure all instances of the colour black that is used, are accurate especially when printing large areas of the colour; whether using rich black or grey scale black, ensure objects are correct. For Adobe products, change the preferences to always display and always output blacks accurately.  (This is hard to see on your monitor as RGB screens show colours more vibrantly, test prints are always important for things like this.)

Photoshop:

  • In general, Photoshop usually only requires you to ensure the document is the proper resolution and the color profile is correct.
  • For high resolution prints, 600 PPI is ideal while 300-350 PPI should be the minimum.
  • If using filters or items which require RGB mode, then work in RGB and convert to CMYK as the final step before outputting the image. This step is dependent upon proper color settings.

InDesign:

  • Ensure your preferences are set to display and output blacks correctly.
  • Ensure you have proper bleeds for your document.
  • Try not to do any major adjustments to placed raster images (images that are not vector), they should be 100% and should not be rotated within InDesign. A minor adjustment may not cause issues, however large rotations and scaling of placed raster images can affect the output of those images.
  • Preflight! Preflight is the industry-standard term for quality checking your document before exporting and handing it off to your printer. InDesign’s Preflight panel helps by warning the user of problems that can prevent a book or document from printing or outputting as desired. Make sure to run this before exporting a files to check for missing fonts or files, RGB issues, over set text, low-resolution images and other various conditions. You can find Preflight in Window > Output > Preflight.

Illustrator

  • Create File in CMYK colour mode.
  • Ensure you have proper bleeds for your document.
  • Add Guides to show trim area or crop marks.
  • Rasterize all type.



Written by @herttz

Designed by @herttz

anonymous asked:

Hello, i want to start making aesthetics, but I have no idea where to start... like for example where do you find the images? a how do you make them smaller without them getting blurry and then how do you put them together.. and how do you change the backgrounds to different colors.. like i'm so lost.. can you give me some tips? i would be grateful :)*

how to make aesthetics like this

okay, so idk if i’m the best person to answer this, but i’ll be doing my best to put up an easy-to-understand tutorial for you. we’ll be going step-by-step :) all the stuff is under the cut since it was rather long

Keep reading

  • The Black Fairy: The police did find evidence of what happened to Belle. I just wanted to save you and Gideon the heartbreak. Look at these pictures.
  • Gold: She took up graphic design?
  • The Black Fairy: What? No, she's traveling the world. Here she is in front of the Eiffel Tower.
  • Gold: These are all clearly terrible Photoshop jobs. Did she make these? Her teacher must be awful.
  • The Black Fairy: No! These are all real! Look how much fun she's having without you.
  • Gold: Has she been doing this for the entire time she's been away? Because these wouldn't fool anybody.
  • The Black Fairy: Apparently not.

One of my all time favorite cartoons! I love the illustration style, the humor and the personality of each character, def recommend to watch this cartoon if you haven’t already! 

For this one, I tried a different technique this time, as you may know, I make my illustrations with Adobe Illustrator and my wacom tablet, but this time I decided to do the shadows in Photoshop, and I just loved how it turned out, I know I need a little bit more practice but looks so much better than doing vector shadows (looks more natural i guess) 

P.S. Don’t forget to enter in my art raffle! Go to my tumblr to see the rules and everything ;) You could win an amazing illustration like this one :p

oh… and does this illustration counts as Inktober? lol, I tried.