all around the moon

How to Safely Watch the Aug. 21 Solar Eclipse


On Aug. 21, 2017, a solar eclipse will be visible in North America. Throughout the continent, the Moon will cover part – or all – of the Sun’s super-bright face for part of the day.

Since it’s never safe to look at the partially eclipsed or uneclipsed Sun, everyone who plans to watch the eclipse needs a plan to watch it safely. One of the easiest ways to watch an eclipse is solar viewing glasses – but there are a few things to check to make sure your glasses are safe:

  •  Glasses should have an ISO 12312-2 certification
  • They should also have the manufacturer’s name and address, and you can check if the manufacturer has been verified by the American Astronomical Society
  • Make sure they have no scratches or damage

To use solar viewing glasses, make sure you put them on before looking up at the Sun, and look away before you remove them. Proper solar viewing glasses are extremely dark, and the landscape around you will be totally black when you put them on – all you should see is the Sun (and maybe some types of extremely bright lights if you have them nearby).

Never use solar viewing glasses while looking through a telescope, binoculars, camera viewfinder, or any other optical device. The concentrated solar rays will damage the filter and enter your eyes, causing serious injury. But you can use solar viewing glasses on top of your regular eyeglasses, if you use them!

If you don’t have solar viewing glasses, there are still ways to watch, like making your own pinhole projector. You can make a handheld box projector with just a few simple supplies – or simply hold any object with a small hole (like a piece of cardstock with a pinhole, or even a colander) above a piece of paper on the ground to project tiny images of the Sun.

Of course, you can also watch the entire eclipse online with us. Tune into nasa.gov/eclipselive starting at noon ET on Aug. 21! 

For people in the path of totality, there will be a few brief moments when it is safe to look directly at the eclipse. Only once the Moon has completely covered the Sun and there is no light shining through is it safe to look at the eclipse. Make sure you put your eclipse glasses back on or return to indirect viewing before the first flash of sunlight appears around the Moon’s edge.

You can look up the length of the total eclipse in your area to help you set a time for the appropriate length of time. Remember – this only applies to people within the path of totality.

Everyone else will need to use eclipse glasses or indirect viewing throughout the entire eclipse!

Photographing the Eclipse

Whether you’re an amateur photographer or a selfie master, try out these tips for photographing the eclipse.  

#1 — Safety first: Make sure you have the required solar filter to protect your camera.

#2 — Any camera is a good camera, whether it’s a high-end DSLR or a camera phone – a good eye and vision for the image you want to create is most important.

#3 — Look up, down, and all around. As the Moon slips in front of the Sun, the landscape will be bathed in long shadows, creating eerie lighting across the landscape. Light filtering through the overlapping leaves of trees, which creates natural pinholes, will also project mini eclipse replicas on the ground. Everywhere you can point your camera can yield exceptional imagery, so be sure to compose some wide-angle photos that can capture your eclipse experience.

#4 — Practice: Be sure you know the capabilities of your camera before Eclipse Day. Most cameras, and even many camera phones, have adjustable exposures, which can help you darken or lighten your image during the tricky eclipse lighting. Make sure you know how to manually focus the camera for crisp shots.

#5 —Upload your eclipse images to NASA’s Eclipse Flickr Gallery and relive the eclipse through other peoples’ images.

Learn all about the Aug. 21 eclipse at eclipse2017.nasa.gov, and follow @NASASun on Twitter and NASA Sun Science on Facebook for more. Watch the eclipse through the eyes of NASA at nasa.gov/eclipselive starting at 12 PM ET on Aug. 21.

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com

She laughed so hard—
so happy and loud
as she sprinkled
rainbow vibes
around,
and yet only
the moon
witnessed
all her
silent cries—
whenever
her heart
felt lonely
at night.
—  ma.c.a // Under the Stars
Our Asteroid-Bound Mission is Set to Slingshot Around Earth

NASA’s first spacecraft to travel to an asteroid will get a boost from Earth tomorrow, Sept. 22. 

Earth’s gravity is going to slingshot OSIRIS-REx toward its target, an asteroid named Bennu.

Asteroids are relatively small, inactive, rocky bodies that orbit around the Sun. Scientists think asteroids like Bennu may have collided with Earth a long time ago, seeding our planet with the organic compounds that made life possible. That means that there’s a good chance Bennu contains answers to fundamental questions about the origins of life and how our solar system came to be. We sent OSIRIS-REx on a journey to investigate.

One of the best ways to change the trajectory of a spacecraft is by using the gravity of a planet or large moon to catapult it. It sounds like science fiction, but this type of maneuver, called a gravity assist, is a fuel-efficient way of traveling through space.

We’re not using the slingshot to speed the spacecraft, we’re doing it to change its direction. That’s because the asteroid’s orbit is tilted six degrees in comparison to Earth’s orbit. When OSIRIS-REx swings by, Earth’s gravity will lift it up and sling it toward Bennu.

Spot the spacecraft

Because at its closest approach OSIRIS-REx will only be 11,000 miles above Earth, you can see it with a backyard telescope. For most observers, the spacecraft will appear between the constellations Cetus and Pisces, but its exact position in the sky will vary by location.

For specifics on locating and photographing OSIRIS-REx, visit our Spot the Spacecraft page.

Wave to OSIRIS-REx

After its closest approach, OSIRIS-REx flip around and look back at Earth, so here’s your chance to say hello! Take a picture of yourself or your group waving to OSIRIS-REx. Then share your photo using the hashtag #HelloOSIRISREx and tag the mission account on Twitter @OSIRISREx or Instagram @OSIRIS_REx.

To Bennu and back

In about a year from now, OSIRIS-REx will arrive at asteroid Bennu.

After it surveys and maps Bennu, OSIRIS-REx will “high-five” the asteroid with its robotic arm to collect a sample, which it will send to Earth. This asteroid sample will be the largest amount of space material transported to Earth since we brought back rocks from the Moon. High-fives all around!

If everything goes according to plan, on Sept. 24, 2023, the capsule containing the asteroid sample will make a soft landing in the Utah desert. That’s the end of the spacecraft’s seven-year-long journey to Bennu and back.

But the mission doesn’t stop there. On Earth, the sample material collected by OSIRIS-REx will be analyzed to determine the asteroid’s chemical composition. Scientists will look for organic compounds like amino acids and sugars — the building blocks for life. 

Bennu is approximately 4.5 billion years old. Our solar system is 4.6 billion years old. That means that Bennu is made up of some of the oldest stuff in our solar system. So samples from Bennu could tell us more about how our solar system evolved and possibly even how life began on Earth!
Learn more about asteroid Bennu, the OSIRIS-REx mission and the Earth gravity assist. 

Follow the mission on Facebook and Twitter for the latest updates. 

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com.

Now she shines [        ] like
the rose-fingered moon
rising after sundown, erasing all

stars around her, and pouring light equally
across the salt sea
and over densely flowered fields

lucent under dew.
—  Sappho, excerpt of To Atthis (tr. by Willis Barstone)

anonymous asked:

um excuse me but the sun is obviously a trans woman with body hair, that exist ya'know, she's in a relationship with her wife, the moon smh theyre butch lesbians

the moon and the sun have nothin to do with each other!! the moon is in a relationship with the ocean have u never heard of TIDES????? the sun. is. a. BEAR. 😡

6

So, a Water Tribe Betrothal Necklace is, traditionally, a hand-carved piece of jewelry given by a bride-to-be’s intended. It’s clear that a very traditional theme to have is a sense of roundness. This is shown by the first four necklaces shown.

The bottom two, Bolin’s, and Kya’s, differ highly from this, making them non-traditional. Now Bolin’s makes sense in the context we’re given from the show. Eska was shown to be slightly deranged and didn’t understand that Bolin wanted to get out of their relationship. The heavy-gothic themes help to show the dread, despair, and chain-like quality Bolin must feel. Despite this though, it still features a somewhat-round centerpiece like the traditional necklaces do.

But, Kya’s is also different. We found out via Word of God that Kya is LGBTA+. If she’s wearing a necklace, does this mean that her (assumed) wife carved it for her? Did Kya carve out one similarly for her wife? 

I like to assume that the design Kya wears also symbolizes how her relationship is non-traditional, just as her necklace is.

Also don’t picture Korra and/or Asami carving and giving the other a necklace.

10

Stormlight Archive

↳ Greater Roshar || The Outer Planets

An asteroid belt separates Ashyn, Roshar and Braize from ten massive gas giants. Each planet is designated by a Rosharan numeral. They are uninhabited and possess neither moons nor rings. 

The Cosmere Galaxy Project
Greater Roshar || Greater Roshar II || Scadrial || Nalthian System || Sel System || Shardworlds || Astronomy