aldabra atoll

September 4, 2016 - White-throated Rail (Dryolimnas cuvieri)

These rails are found throughout Madagascar, with a flightless subspecies on Aldabra Atoll in the Seychelles. Another subspecies once lived on Assumption Island, but was driven to extinction by introduced predators in the early 20th century. They eat a variety of invertebrates, including mollusks, ghost crabs, and insects. They may also follow tortoises to pick insects from their shells, or catch those stirred up by their footsteps. Nesting on the ground, they build loose twig nests in depressions on rocks, or sturdier bowl-shaped nests in vegetation. Both parents feed the chicks for about two weeks, then become aggressive toward them.

Blacktip reef sharks lounge in just centimeters of bath-warm water and wait for the tide to refill the lagoon at the remote atoll of Aldabra. To keep oxygenated water running over the gills they all face snout first into the current, dorsal fins breaking the surface in unison like the sails of the long lost fleet.-Thomas Peschak for National Geographic

Photo by @thomaspeschak Aldabra Giant Tortoises seek shade under one of the few small trees that survive in this harsh landscape. Aldabra Atoll is situated in the western Indian Ocean and is part of the Seychelles archipelago. 100 years ago giant tortoise numbers were down to a few thousand, but a ban on harvesting and other conservation measures have allowed this population to rebound to over 100,000. Shot on assignment for @natgeo for a upcoming story on the resurrection of Seychelles biodiversity. @seychellesislandfoundation @sif #seychelles #tortoises #conservation #shade #sun #hot by natgeo

Photograph by @thomaspeschak Blacktip reef sharks lounge in just centimeters of bath-warm water and wait for the tide to refill the lagoon at the remote atoll of Aldabra. To keep oxygenated water running over the gills they all face snout first into the current, dorsal fins breaking the surface in unison like the sails of a long lost fleet. To cram as many sharks as possible into the frame I used a small ladder to get an elevated view and voila …… sometimes all that it takes to turn a mediocre image into a good picture is a very small shift in perspective.
Not all sharks sit out the low tide on the flats, some escape to the adjacent mangroves. To see a unique underwater photograph of a blacktip shark swimming amongst submerged trees please follow @thomaspeschak and check my feed in one hour.
#seychelles #sif #aldabra #sharks #photooftheday #picoftheday

Shot on assignment for @natgeo magazine for the story “Return to the Seychelles” just published in the March 2016 issue. by natgeo