alcohol-advertising

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42 Below Vodka - brewed right here in Sydney, New Zealand

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I’ve loved every iteration of Laphroaig’s “Opinions Welcome” campaign, so much so that it’s a rare campaign to convince me to buy/try the product in question. 

Here we have a more sprawling and lilting take on this premise, which gives a touch of gravitas while keeping a hint of the dry humour that makes this message work.

P.s. For better or worse, it lives up to it’s advertising.

Rules On Advertising (Summary)

- links between alcohol advertising and peoples awareness and attitudes to drinking.

*Alcohol ads must not be directed at people under 18 or contain anything that is likely to appeal to them by reflecting youth culture, by linking alcohol with irresponsible behaviour, social success or sexual attractiveness.

*TV and Radio advertising rules - alcohol ads are banned from appearing in and around programmes commissioned for or principally targeted at audiences below 18.

*Can’t be used to enhance confidence - success of a social event, capable of changing mood or behaviour.

Traffic Monsoon
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Traffic Monsoon – why does it work?

Traffic Monsoon is now one of the most visited sites in the world, and that’s without a huge following from the Americas.  Why is that, and why is that something you should be interested in?

Since January, 2015, this site has shot up and broken through into the top 1000 sites visited world wide, yet a relatively small percentage of their traffic is from the…

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Rules on Alcohol Advertising

Alcohol advertising

Alcohol advertising is often a sensitive topic. Societal concerns about alcohol, in particular problems such as binge and underage drinking, mean that it is rarely out of the headlines. With these issues high on the political agenda close scrutiny has been given to those factors that may influence the amount of alcohol we consume.

The UK advertising rules for alcohol are amongst the strictest in the world. The rules are based upon evidence that points to a link between alcohol advertising and people’s awareness and attitudes to drinking. Accordingly the rules, independently enforced by the ASA, were significantly tightened in 2005 and were again re-evaluated and subject to full public consultation in 2009.

The stringent rules, which apply across all media and are mandatory, place a particular emphasis on protecting young people; alcohol ads must not be directed at people under 18 or contain anything that is likely to appeal to them by reflecting youth culture or by linking alcohol with irresponsible behaviour, social success or sexual attractiveness.

The TV and radio advertising rules contain strict controls about the placement and content of alcohol advertising. Alcohol ads are banned from appearing in and around programmes commissioned for or principally targeted at audiences below the age of 18, as well as programmes likely to appeal particularly to audiences below the age of 18.

As shown by the example adjudications below, the ASA has been robust in applying these rules on those rare occasions when advertisers get it wrong:

Budge Brands Ltd t/a Premier Estates Wine – A tweet and videos that appeared on the advertiser’s website promoting wine presented a woman in a degrading manner which was likely to cause serious or widespread offence as well as linking alcohol with sexual activity.

Diageo Great Britain Ltd t/a Parrot Bay – A TV ad, for an alcoholic frozen cocktail drink featured a colourful animated parrot in a tropical setting. The ad, particularly the parrot character and its behaviour was likely to appeal strongly to children and was therefore irresponsible.
Beverage Brands (UK) Ltd – The Facebook page for the alcoholic drink, WKD showed various ads that broke the rules because they implied alcohol could enhance confidence, was integral to the success of a social event, or was capable of changing mood or behaviour.

ASA investigations, pro-active monitoring of alcohol advertisements and ongoing advice, guidance and training for industry help to maintain high compliance rates with the strict rules.

In May 2013 the ASA welcomed research by our co-regulatory partner, Ofcom, into children’s exposure to alcohol advertising on TV.  The research was commissioned in light of the Government’s Alcohol Strategy.

In response to that research the ASA investigated audience data, provided by Ofcom, and took action against broadcasters that breached the scheduling rules, examples are provided below:

Channel Four Television Corporation t/a Film4 - We told Film 4 to ensure they took more care when scheduling alcohol ads in the future.

Paramount UK Partnership t/a Comedy Central - We were concerned that an alcohol ad was broadcast in a film principally directed at audiences below the age of 18 years.

Discovery Communications Europe Ltd t/a Discovery - We told Discovery to follow the BCAP Guidance Note 4 and use the 10 to 15 audience index for forecasting the likely appeal of a programme to audiences below the age of 18 years.

In December 2013 the Broadcast Committee of Advertising Practice, our sister body that writes and maintains the advertising rules for broadcast, published a new, strengthened, guidance note on the scheduling of TV advertisements to help broadcasters identify which television programmes should exclude ads for alcohol and other age restricted products.

https://www.asa.org.uk/News-resources/Hot-Topics/Alcohol.aspx?gclid=CNqnnf2u6MkCFSMHwwod8K8Kmg#.VnWI3hqLSgR

Lorraine Kelly "Grills"Charlotte Crosby On Live TV!

Lorraine Kelly “Grills”Charlotte Crosby On Live TV!

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Lorraine Kelly has been critasized on social media after she “grilled” Geordie Shore star Charlotte Crosby about wetting the bed live on TV. Charlotte is not a strage to showing herself up on TV, with having sex on TV,Peeing the bed,partying and plenty plenty more. During the interview Lorraine on her show yesterday, Kelly was accused of “grilling and bully” Charlotte as one person said on…

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Smoking and Drinking...and Advertising, Done by a Woman

Not just any woman – these ads were done by Diane Rothschild, a true advertising tour de force. Many of her ads are legendary, including this one from the 1990s she created for for J&B Scotch Whiskey.

One of very few women in the One Club Creative Hall of Fame, Ms. Rothschild passed away in 2007…from lung cancer. Upon learning she had the disease, she began planning a print campaign for the Lung Cancer Alliance. The hard-hitting campaign began running shortly after her death.

Her brilliance will forever be an inspiration. ~ @AdvertGirl