alchemical manuscript

8

Hello, all my lovely followers! Long time no see! Sorry for the prolonged lack of original posts, but I’ve been crazy busy at my new job as Library Technician at Smithsonian Libraries (@smithsonianlibraries)! I’m working primarily at the Cullman Library in the Natural History Museum, which houses the Smithsonian’s special collections relating to natural history, although I’ve also spent some time at the Dibner Library, which is home to special collections relating to the physical sciences.

Although I’ve only been there for two months, I’ve had the opportunity to do and see some amazing things! From a shelving unit for miniature books to a well-loved 13th century Armenian manuscript (MSS 1675B), the Libraries are truly full of wonders great and small. One of my favorites is the volvelle, or rotating calculator, found in a 16th century alchemical manuscript (MSS 867B)– I just love it when books are interactive! Expect more from that one in the future.

During the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries a considerable number of alchemical adepts made their way from place to place throughout Europe, appearing and disappearing apparently at will. According to popular tradition, these adepts were immortal, and kept themselves alive by means of the mysterious medicine that was one of the goals of alchemical aspiration. It is asserted that some lived hundreds of years, taking no food except this elixir, a few drops of which would preserve their youth for a long period of time. That such mysterious men did exist there can be little doubt, as their presence is attested by scores of reliable witnesses.
Manly P. Hall, “The Secret Teachings of All Ages”

Manly P. Hall. Collection of Alchemical Manuscripts. Box No. 4. 1600.

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child Fic: New Valentines

By @ijustwalkintomordor

4.1K words, G rated

Scorpius knows his dad is lonely, so he convinces Albus to help set him up with the new smokey-eyed potions professor. If Scorpius has his way they’ll all have a happy Valentine’s Day. 

Keep reading

anonymous asked:

Having seen the play, i'm surprised how much hate CC receives. I think people had their own headcanons that CC didn't follow or is just hate for the sake of hate like it happens with many things in social media. Or is because it's not the same reading the script and watching the play. Anyway, I have a question for you. The only part that i never expected was JKR giving Draco a somehow redemption storyline. (1)

           She was very adamant in the past to keep telling people (mainly teen girls) that they shouldn’t romanticized him and it’s unhealthy to believe that a special girl is going to change him. Then CC comes and she does exactly that. She gives him a sad storyline with his sick wife that made him a better person, an excuse for his past actions (if you’re alone you can go dark) and even uses Cedric to prove that anyone could be like Draco and in the end she makes him a part of the group.(2)      

This is exactly what she stood against for many years. Do you think she just gave up trying and gave Draco fans what they always wanted? I’m not asking if you agree with Draco’s storyline or not, that’s irrelevant. I’m asking why you think JKR did something that contradicts all her past comments about Draco. Sorry for the 3 part message.            


I agree about your reasons for people being negative about CC, headcanons, the same hate for hate’s sake that’s always been a big part of fandom. (Back when I was on livejournal I started a community where members were meant to be positive about Harry Potter and people freaked out. Like, all of fandom wasn’t big enough for them, then needed to infiltrate my one little community with their Slytherin appologist/anti-JKR/anti-Gryffindor nonsense as well.)

ANYWAY,

It is really funny about Draco, isn’t it? I was honest to god shocked, but in a really good way. I 100% agree with JKR about people needing to take a step back and look at book Draco for who he really was. (And it wasn’t just teens, it’s adult women in their 30s and 40s too. I just think JKR couldn’t imagine that she’d have to point out to grown women that a racist, over-entitled bully might not be the best character to romanticise.) The reaction to her Pottermore post on Draco was fucking ridiculous and left me embarrassed to be part of Drarry fandom.  Develop your own headcanon if you like, but then don’t blame JKR when she reminds you that it’s a headcanon and that Draco wasn’t that much of a sweetheart in the books.

The Pottermore article does say that he changed after the war and refused to “follow the same old pure-blood line”. And the idea that Astoria supported the softening of Draco’s bigotry also comes directly from JKR in the Pottermore article: “Astoria refused to raise their grandson Scorpius in the belief that Muggles were scum, family gatherings were often fraught with tension.” So she never said that we were meant to view him as Lucius 2. She also says that he was in a large part the result of his upbringing. That’s not just in the play.

Also this: “I see in his hobbies further confirmation of his dual nature. The collection of Dark artefacts harks back to family history, even though he keeps them in glass cases and does not use them. However, his strange interest in alchemical manuscripts, from which he never attempts to make a Philosopher’s Stone, hints at a wish for something other than wealth, perhaps even the wish to be a better man. I have high hopes that he will raise Scorpius to be a much kinder and more tolerant Malfoy than he was in his own youth.“ & “There is, after all - and at the risk of re-kindling unhealthy fantasies - some unextinguished good at the heart of Draco.“

So JKR was never insistent that Draco was irredeemably bad or dark-hearted. The man we see in the play doesn’t really contradict anything she’s previously said. (Draco does become friends with Harry, kind-of-a-little-bit, but they aren’t best friends.)

That said, I also think there was an element of giving Draco fans what they’d always wanted. She’s incredibly giving that way, despite all the neverending shit she gets from fandomers. There are a lot of things in the play that feel like gifts to me: The “Ron and Hermione are in love in every reality” thread felt like an apology for the Wonderland interview. Harry’s journey felt like a response to all the people who complained that Harry didn’t show enough evidence of trauma. Harry’s conversation with Dumbledore was something a lot of people needed to see. And the friendship between Albus and Scorpius was something I think a whole, whole lot of us hoped for.

However his strange interest in alchemical manuscripts, from which he never attempts to make a philosopher’s stone, hints at a wish for something other than wealth, perhaps even the wish to be a better man. I have high hopes that he will raise Scorpius to be a much kinder and more tolerant Malfoy than he was in his own youth.
—  JKR on one of the nicest things she’s ever said about Draco Malfoy. And that is saying something, because it still makes me grind my teeth. 
9

For all serious students of hermetic science and alchemy:

I want to comment on this exquisite “standard edition” of what has been dubbed The Philosopher’s Stone by Hellfire Club Books. This is a facsimile of an alchemical manuscript supposedly written in the hand of none other than the infamous Edward Kelly. Perhaps not surprisingly, the book opens with a short introduction describing Kelly’s death. I’ve always been skeptical of that story myself.

The work refers to itself as “Science to Become Happy”. It was written sometime around 1597 and contains a plethora of alchemical instructions. Many of the symbols and phrases will be familiar to any devoted student, but others will likely warrant years of study and prayer/meditation before attempting to be deciphered.

Very notably, the publisher’s name appears nowhere on the book, it is literally just the covers and the manuscript, with not even a copyright indication. It is refreshing to see a publisher of such high quality appear to be humble before the majesty of the manuscript, with its work enhancing, not distracting from the original.

Thank you for making this valuable work available to the world.

I’m at the public library looking at the computer catalog, and the last person had futilely searched the catalog for “The Turba Philosophorum”

which is apparently one of the most ancient alchemical texts in existence. I’d never heard of it.

I have so many questions - who were they? did they eventually find the ancient mystical alchemical manuscript they were looking for? did they need it to help them complete their ritual? was an ancient wizard using this very computer before I arrived

2

I see in his hobbies further confirmation of his dual nature. The collection of Dark artefacts harks back to family history, even though he keeps them in glass cases and does not use them. However, his strange interest in alchemical manuscripts, from which he never attempts to make a Philosopher’s Stone, hints at a wish for something other than wealth, perhaps even the wish to be a better man.