albumenized

“Interno del Colosseo” by Giovanni Battista Altadonna

Italian, 1850s

albumen silver print from glass negative

Metropolitan Museum of Art

Stereoview scene of a group drinking tea in a room probably in a photography studio, British, c. 1860′s/1870′s.

Source: Rijksmuseum.

flickr

GEISHA AMONG THE BIG TREES by Okinawa Soba

<br /><i>Via Flickr:</i>
<br />As most of you know, it's hard to get these girls out of the studio, and into the woods for a nice photo session.  And usually, when a photographer does get them out on the beaten trail, he ends up zooming in on them anyway.

Note the ‘rickshaw guys (or yama-kago guys) blending into the trees like a couple of bugs on the bark. It must have been a nice crisp, day for photography. I can almost smell the forest.

Here’s the full 3-D version : www.flickr.com/photos/24443965@N08/2821967035/

This photo is a ca.1900 albumen half-stereoview by an unknown photographer working for the New Hampshire, USA photographer and publisher, Ben Kilburn. Old Ben never made it to Japan, but the guy he sent out did a fine job, and is responsible for a fine group of views published by Kilburn in 1901. This view is “different” because the photographer was well known for tight, closely cropped portraits and groups.

All of Kilburn’s JAPAN , KOREA, and CHINA views were by this same photographer.

Here are some more by the same photographer. For some reason, although I have more JAPAN views than KOREA views by this guy, I have posed more of the Korean ones. Still, there’s a few nice Japan in the group. www.flickr.com/search/?w=24443965@N08&q=Kilburn&m…

Carte de visite portrait of actress Kitty Dowd wearing a costume titled “The Devil’s Auction” probably taken in New York City, 1867. By J. Gurney and Son.

Source: Library of Congress.

“Fragment from Balustrade of the Temple of Athena Nike, Acropolis, Athens” by William James Stillman

c. 1882

albumen silver print from glass negative

Gillman Collection, Metropolitan Museum of Art

Stereoview portrait of a dog in sitting in a studio in Augusta, Maine, c. 1800′s. By Hanson and Kimball’s Stereoscopic Views.

Source: New York Public Library.

Foodstuffs in Morrowind and What They Taste Like

Ash Yams:  “Ash yam is a tough tuberous root vegetable…”

  These taste like sweet potatoes, although very grainy and with a tough outer skin that outlanders peel off before eating because it is both tough and bitter.  A true Dunmer would never dream of peeling off this skin.  They like it.

Bread:  

   Very common food, very basic.  Generally cooked in a wood-burning oven, the texture is baguette-like and extremely crusty.  The flavor itself is bland but palatable.  The amount of salt added to the dough depends on the region; water-rich areas tend to eat saltier bread.

Comberry:  "The comberry is a bush that produces a bitter berry, best known as the basis of the native comberry brandy, a rough but potent alcoholic beverage of Morrowind…”

   Similar in flavor to an unripe mulberry.  Except incredibly bitter, like you-just-licked-the-spout-of-a-well-used-Keurig bitter.  It sweetens during the fermentation process, however not by much.

Crab Meat"The mudcrab native to Vvardenfell is prized for its sweet crab meat…”

   Because mudcrabs are, at their smallest, the size of a large chihuahua, they usually produce enough meat to feed a modest family of three (elves don’t have many children).  Though all mudcrap meat is tough and chewy, the younger the crab the more tender the meat.

Hackle-Lo Leaf:  "Hackle-lo leaf is a tasty edible succulent leaf…”

   One of the most common vegetables eaten on Vvardenfell.  Though its shape and texture are similar to a fat kale leaf, its properties are more similar to a squash.  When left uncooked, it has a crispness and flavor like a cucumber.  Cooked, it tastes like sauteed zucchini.  Its versatility with spice and other foods is why it is preferred over other vegetables.

Hound Meat:  "Hound meat is the flesh of the nix-hound. The meat is sweet and tender…”

   Most similar to beef.  Nix-Hounds are much, MUCH leaner than cows, however, and so the meat they produce has a very low fat content.  Maybe that’s why all the Dunmer are so thin?  Or maybe they are constantly burning calories by scowling all the time?  Nirn may never know.

Kwama Eggs:  "Kwama eggs are a rich, nutritious foodstuff…”

  Large kwama eggs are the size of ostrich eggs, and small kwama eggs are the size of bigger-than-average-jumbo chicken eggs.  Whatever the case they’re bigger than a chicken egg, and if you wanted to scramble them for breakfast you’d just have to crack one open for a heaping plate.  The taste is yolky, but the yolk-to-albumen ratio is pretty even.  A waxier texture, it squeaks on your teeth when eaten.

Marshmerrow"The sweet pulp of marshmerrow reeds is a delectable foodstuff…”

   Fruity and sweet, it is served both raw and cooked.  The taste is honestly kinda like a marshmallow (believe it or not), but with an almost peachy undertone.  The raw, watery pulp is eaten with a spoon, but when cooked, it’s eaten with a fork.  To use the wrong utensil is a grave social mistake, as is every other action done by outlanders.  Like existing.

Rat Meat:  "Rat meat is tough and greasy, with an unpleasant odor and taste. Nonetheless, it is cheap, abundant, and nutritious, and palatable when cooked in a stew and masked by strong strong spices.”

   Texture is most like pork.  Eating rat meat in a stew is like eating the little meatballs in Spaghetti-O’s; you can eat it just fine when you don’t think about it.  It has high tryptophan content, so it makes you sleepy, just like eating turkey does.

Saltrice:  “Saltrice is another of the tasty and nutritious foodstuffs…”

   Though fibrous, it becomes easier to chew the longer you cook it, often by boiling (Dunmer need their colons cleansed, too).  Similar in flavor to cabbage, it is eaten both raw and cooked, usually as an additive to stews.

Scrib Jelly:   “…Crushed scribs produce a nutritious but sour-tasting gelatin… that the natives eat with gusto.”

   This is nothing like sweet pectin fruit jellies.  It’s like pork-bone-yellow-nasty-meat-gelatin.  But the coagulative properties come from the chitin (pronounced KITE-in) shell of scribs.  They don’t have bones.  It’s definitely an acquired taste, and it does grow on you with each successive mouthful.  The texture is like that of thick refried beans, and the flavor is that of mild buttermilk.

Scrib Jerky:  “Scribs cut into strips and dried in the sun are called scrib jerky… tastes scarcely worse when spoiled than when fresh, and are a practical foodstuff for the hardy native traveler.”

   Very chewy, very dry.  But all around not bad.  One of the most versatile foods in terms of flavors, it ranges from sweet to savory.  Scrib jerky produced in traditional dry-rub methods is incredibly salty and rather spicy, and is eaten regularly among the ashlanders.  In modern cities, the meat is marinated first in a usually sweet sauce, and it produces a more tender jerky, but it doesn’t last as long.

Scuttle:  “Scuttle is Vvardenfell’s favorite local dish. This cheese-like, greasy substance made from the flesh of local beetles is remarkably tasty…”

      Eaten with a knife and fork, it is generally reserved for those in the upper class, though all but the poorest Dunmer will find a way to eat it at least twice a year on special occasions.  A robust dish, it is comparable in texture to paneer.  The flavor is spicy, and it tastes like a Masala dish. 

Trama Root:  "A calming tea with modest magical properties is brewed from the thick, bitter-tasting root of the trama shrub…”

   Most similar in taste to Oolong tea.  Almost a smokey flavor, but definitely a woody undertone.  Perhaps more like an overtone.  No one eats the trama root itself, except for confused and inferior outlanders.  But the tea is good and is drank throughout the day, especially in the evening.

Trees covered with snow. Holes drilled in card to fasten into book. Handwritten on card front: “Winter scene at Tamarack Mines, near Red Jacket, Mich., near Calumet.”

  • Courtesy of the Burton Historical Collection, Detroit Public Library

Portrait of general Winfield Scott, c. 1860′s. Probably one of the last photographs taken of him shortly before his death in 1866.

Source: Library of Congress.

Carte de visite view of a busy street in the Montmartre section of Paris, France, c. 1865.

Source: Rijksmuseum.