Taylor Swift’s debut album Taylor Swift was released 10 years ago today.

It’s hard to remember a time before her outsize cultural influence, which spans not only country and pop music but Twitter, “good girls,” confessional writing, capitalism, the music streaming wars, “squad goals,” red lipstick, white feminism, tabloid culture, Tumblr memes, music videos, Coca Cola, and the unbearable creepiness of John Mayer.

In fact, it’s so hard to remember a moment in time that didn’t exist in the shadow of Swift’s unstoppable, bazillion-watt light that we might as well not even try. Let’s just walk through the last 10 years, dwell on the biggest, most Swiftian moments, and struggle once again to understand how — for better or for worse — we ever lived without her.


The Beatles gathered at EMI Studios (3 Abbey Rd, London) on the morning of Friday 8th August 1969 for one of the most famous photo shoots of their career. Photographer Ian Macmillan took the famous image that adorned their last-recorded album, Abbey Road. 

Prior to the shoot, Paul McCartney had sketched his ideas for the cover, to which Macmillan added a more detailed illustration. (image 1)

A policeman held the traffic as Macmillan, from a stepladder positioned in the middle of the road, took six shots as the group walked across the zebra crossing just outside the studio.

The baby from Nirvana’s ‘Nevermind’ album cover is all grown up. In honor of the album’s 25-year anniversary, he was paid $200 to recreate the image, which is the same amount his parents were paid when he was an infant. He wanted to be naked to stay true to the original, but the photographer talked him out of it. Source

Today Nirvana’s album “Nevermind”, released September 24, 1991, is celebrating its 24th anniversary.

Celebrate the album by giving it a listen.

Purchase on iTunes

Check out other albums release today

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Perfect in All Its Imperfections" Elliott Smith’s ‘Roman Candle’

Elliott Smith’s acoustic guitar creaks and squeaks like an old house on his debut, Roman Candle, released 20 years ago today (July 14). Of the five albums Smith made over the course of his nine-year solo career, his debut was the most lo-fi, both in aesthetic and in process. As Gonson explained in Pitckfork’s oral history of Smith’s career, Smith would spent hours writing the songs that’d become Roman Candle in the upstairs portion of the house they shared together on Taylor Street in Portland. When he was ready to record, he’d retreat to the basement, where “he was perched on a stool surrounded by garbage.” Needless to say, he recorded the songs that would become Roman Candle quite quickly.

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