Say hello to the second tallest mountain in America: Mount St. Elias in Wrangell-St. Elias National Park & Preserve in Alaska. Standing over 18,000 feet tall, it towers over Icy Bay, which gets its name from the glaciers that run down Mount St. Elias’s slopes. It’s just one of the many amazing natural sights in America’s largest national park. Photo by Bryan Petrtyl, National Park Service.

9

星野道夫が愛した地『アラスカ』を行く ~ワイズマン編~

調査地へ向かう途中での2泊。一人でスノーシューハイクしたりオーロラ撮ったり向こうの家族と仲良くなったり…。ただただ幸せ。

夢のような時間でした。

一枚目 【焦点距離】300mm【ISO】64【SS】1/640【F値】/6.3

二段目左【焦点距離】16mm【ISO】64【SS】1/100【F値】/8  

二段右目【焦点距離】85mm【ISO】100【SS】1/100【F値】/8  

四枚目【焦点距離】20mm【ISO】64【SS】1/500【F値】/6.3  

四段目左【焦点距離】20mm【ISO】64【SS】1/125【F値】/6.3  

四段目中【焦点距離】20mm【ISO】160【SS】1/40【F値】/5.6  

四段目右【焦点距離】15mm【ISO】800【SS】1/2.5【F値】/3.5  

八枚目【焦点距離】20mm【ISO】110【SS】1/40【F値】/5.6  

九枚目【焦点距離】20mm【ISO】3200【SS】1.6【F値】/1.8  

instagram

Ride along with an Alaskan dog team

Most American school children learn that Japan attacked Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, leading us to join World War II. This week marks the 75th anniversary of Japanese-Americans being subsequently rounded up and interned as suspected enemies of the state. But there’s another tragic and untold story of American citizens who were also interned during the war. I’m a member of the Ahtna tribe of Alaska and I’ve spent the better part of 30 years uncovering and putting together fragments of a story that deserves to be told.

In June 1942, Japan invaded and occupied Kiska and Attu, the westernmost islands of Alaska’s Aleutian Chain, an archipelago of 69 islands stretching some 1,200 miles across the North Pacific Ocean toward Russia’s Kamchatka Peninsula. From a strategic perspective, Japan wanted to close what they perceived as America’s back door to the Far East. For thousands of years, the islands have been inhabited by a resourceful indigenous people called Aleuts. During the Russian-American Period (1733 to 1867), when Alaska was a colonial possession of Russia, Russian fur-seekers decimated Aleut populations through warfare, disease, and slavery.

Shortly after Japan’s invasion, American naval personnel arrived with orders to round up and evacuate Aleuts from the Aleutian Chain and the Pribilof Islands to internment camps almost 2,000 miles away near Juneau. Stewardship of the internment camps would fall under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services (USF&WS). Furthermore, orders included the burning of the villages to the ground, including their beloved churches, as part of a “scorched earth” policy. The Army’s stated purpose was to protect the Aleuts, who were American citizens, from the dangers of war. But one officer told astonished Aleuts that it was, as he put it, “Because ya’ll look like Japs and we wouldn’t want to shoot you.” That exchange is part of a documentary video called Aleut Evacuation.

The Other WWII American-Internment Atrocity

Photo: National Archives, General Records of the Department of the Navy