alan clayson

For Harrison it is clearly a great relief to have found such a partnership of [relative] equals to which he can repair [The Traveling Wilburys]… Despite making a spectacular comeback with Cloud Nine in 1987, he remains an ensemble player at heart.

Between us on the desk is a copy of the new biography on Harrison called The Quiet One, by Alan Clayson. It is wrapped in a plain white cover. Harrison has not read it. ‘This Italian guy called Red Ronnie just gave it to me,’ he says picking it up gingerly. 'I don’t know who this writer is. All he knows about me is what he’s read in the papers or heard in interviews. He doesn’t know me. There was another one last year. God knows why these people bother, to make some money I suppose, because it’s not important to history to have a stranger’s version of what my life is supposed to be. There have been far too many Beatles books and it’s depressing when you read a load of nasty things and even if you read about good things, it doesn’t serve any purpose. I expect that I’ll just leave it lying around the house and then my wife can read all the extra-marital affairs I’m supposed to have had and all the drugs I’m supposed to have taken.’

—  David Sinclair, UK columnist, interviews George Harrison, c. October 1990

Olivia, George and Dhani Harrison, Heathrow Airport, August 1988. Photo © Mirrorpix/Newscom.

“Then there’s the other gutter snipers that come along. There’s a bunch of newspapers in England, in particular, which just write anything that comes into their heads – any sordid little story they want to come up with about anybody. And they pursue it. In one way, if you can rise above that, they can still say nasty things about me but I don’t really read the papers and I certainly don’t let it affect me because I know what I am myself.
On the other hand, I think occasionally they need to be put into their place too. It’s certainly not harmful to have a little attack on them occasionally. Because most of it’s brainless. I view it more as a situation where they are read by so many people that it’s like a plot the keep these people’s consciousness down. That’s the moral shame of it all. That’s what I don’t like – where it’s real ignorance that doesn’t do our society any good. That’s why the gossip papers are the Devil’s Radio. It’s not really an attack on them – it’s just to remind them… and me, because I can gossip just like the rest… just to remind us all that gossip isn’t really good – it’s such a negative thing.” - George Harrison, 1988 [x]

“Between us on the desk is a copy of the new biography on Harrison called The Quiet One, by Alan Clayson. It is wrapped in a plain white cover. Harrison has not read it. ‘This Italian guy called Red Ronnie just gave it to me,’ he says picking it up gingerly. ‘I don’t know who this writer is. All he knows about me is what he’s read in the papers or heard in interviews. He doesn’t know me. There was another one last year. God knows why these people bother, to make some money I suppose, because it’s not important to history to have a stranger’s version of what my life is supposed to be. There have been far too many Beatles books and it’s depressing when you read a load of nasty things and even if you read about good things, it doesn’t serve any purpose. I expect that I’ll just leave it lying around the house and then my wife can read all the extra-marital affairs I’m supposed to have had and all the drugs I’m supposed to have taken.’” - David Sinclair, UK columnist, interviews George Harrison, c. October 1990 [x]

“Some media coverage of the documentary [Living in the Material World] has concentrated on George [Harrison]’s attraction to women and the difficulties that caused.
‘I don’t actually read those papers,’ says Olivia, who describes her husband as 'a very creative person, a very charismatic person, and just a fascinating guy’.” - Liverpool Echo, 26 September 2011 [x]

“'My dad was always, "Don’t be famous. Don’t envy this. Be a musician, but don’t be famous. You lose all your freedom and you can’t do anything. You have to live a different life,”’ [Dhani] Harrison recalled. 'We were both private people, and he did a really great job of keeping me out of the press all my life.’“ - New York Times Syndicate, 15 March 2013

Between us on the desk is a copy of the new biography on Harrison called The Quiet One, by Alan Clayson. It is wrapped in a plain white cover. Harrison has not read it. ‘This Italian guy called Red Ronnie just gave it to me,’ he says picking it up gingerly. ‘I don’t know who this writer is. All he knows about me is what he’s read in the papers or heard in interviews. He doesn’t know me. There was another one last year. God knows why these people bother, to make some money I suppose, because it’s not important to history to have a stranger’s version of what my life is supposed to be. There have been far too many Beatles books and it’s depressing when you read a load of nasty things and even if you read about good things, it doesn’t serve any purpose. I expect that I’ll just leave it lying around the house and then my wife can read all the extra-marital affairs I’m supposed to have had and all the drugs I’m supposed to have taken.’
—  David Sinclair, UK columnist, interviews George Harrison, c. October 1990
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George & Ringo early to older photo set

“Although George was initially indifferent, even antipathetic, to Ringo, “the nasty one with the little grey streak of hair “ as he’d rhyme more than 20 years later, “Dislike someone and will not bend/Later they will become your friend.” -excerpted from “George Harrison” by Alan Clayson,

Happy Birthday Ringo!