agvocacy

agricultureproud.com
Agriculture Proud

Agriculture, It’s more than part of life. It’s a passion, a lifestyle, a resilient community that works hard to feed the world!

Being Agriculture Proud is simply telling YOUR story. Why are you proud to be a part of Agriculture? Are you passionate about your job? If so, you should find no problem sharing this story with others.

How is this done?

  • Be real and authentic about your passion for Agriculture
  • Show the enthusiasm for your passion
  • Keep it simple and to the point
  • Make it a candid point of view (everything in life is not flowers and sunshine)
  • Stick to your experience. You can’t defend everyone
Coles announcement highlights need for Mandatory Code of Conduct

On the heels of Coles’ admission to the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) yesterday, Australian Dairy Farmers (ADF) has reiterated the need for stronger competition laws that will protect suppliers against the unjust activities of major retailers.

ADF President, Noel Campbell said that Coles’ announcement was a damning indictment against the supermarket giant, whose actions and continual denial over the past four years have had significant negative impacts on suppliers and dairy farmers affected by $1 per litre milk.

“Coles has misled Australian consumers and Parliament for too long on this issue,” Mr Campbell said.

“They have finally confirmed what ADF, and others, have long said about their unsustainable $1 per litre milk campaign. This admission does nothing to rectify the damage they have inflicted upon processors and dairy farmers, who have ultimately paid for their unsustainable price cuts.”

Mr Campbell said the announcement highlighted the need for a Mandatory Code of Conduct with significant penalties and a Supermarket Ombudsman to enforce the Code.

“Coles must pay suppliers, and ultimately farmers, a fair price for their hard work. They should not be able to force the costs of unsustainable price cuts onto farmers,” he said.

ADF looks forward to the findings of the Harper Review of Competition Law and Policy, with the hope that this will foster a fairer supply sector going forward and end unjust practices such as the $1 per litre campaign.

ADF thanked the ACCC for its persistence in pursuing Coles in this matter, and said it will be watching the court proceedings closely.

National Geographic Features Cattle Feedlots | Podcast

New Post: Ray Bowman and I discuss National Geographic Feature on Cattle Feedlots | #agchat #ranchlife #CAFO

Meat is murder. Meat—especially beef—is cigarettes and a Hummer rolled into one. For the sake of the animals, our own health, and the health of the planet, we must eat less of it.
Meat is delicious. Meat is nutritious. Global demand is soaring for good reason, and we must find a way to produce more of it.
In short, meat—especially beef—has become the stuff of fierce debate.
Robert Kunzig, National…

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reelroyreviews.com
Talk of the Town features Reel Roy Reviews, Vol. 2

Thanks to Jennifer Romano and Talk of the Town! Read here. Quote from yours truly: “As my blog rolls into another year of entertainment, rife with comic book adaptations, sequels, Oscar bait, arena shows, and theatrical productions big and small, sometimes I wonder if I am choking the life right from this hobby of mine. Can you imagine if every time you saw a film that your OCD tendencies forced you to rush home, throw some quippy hoo-ha on the internet, and wait eagerly for 3.5 comments to appear? Ah, well, it’s still too much fun to stop now—anticipate Volume THREE Roy’s Movie Migraine shortly.”

Industry farewells two “top blokes”

The Australian dairy industry has recently farewelled two long-standing leaders; dedicated dairy farmers; husbands; fathers; and grandfathers… But most of all, two “top blokes”.

Officially stepping down from their roles as Directors on the ADF Board at the end of 2014, together  Chris Griffin and Peter Evans have served over 70 remarkable years as dairy leaders.

ADF Chair, Noel Campbell said their presence will be missed.

“Their tireless efforts and unrelenting dedication to improving and promoting our great industry over many years has not gone unnoticed,” Mr Campbell said.

With more than 35 years experience in dairying on his farm at Westbury, Gippsland, Mr Griffin has led dairy through tough times of drought and the milk price wars. He has also opened our eyes to the possibilities of the future, in new markets, new technology and innovative on-farm practices.  

Chris Griffin on his Gippsland dairy farm, Victoria.

Mr Griffin, who has served as a member of the ADF Board since 2005, is the immediate past President of ADF, and former Chair of the ADIC, said the industry was full of people who care.

“People join these organisations because they are vehicles for getting things done… This is an industry in great hands and I’ll be watching with keen interest,” Mr Griffin said.

West Australian dairy farmer, Mr Evans has been active in farmers associations since 1978 and has held many notable industry positions, including having served on the ADF Board since 2007 and in the role of ADF Vice President from 2011 to 2012.

Most recently winner of the prestigious WA Milk Bottle Award for outstanding service to the dairy industry earlier this year, Mr Evans said he never considered himself to be a “political animal”.

“I never considered myself to be a political animal but because of poor politics in WA (at the time of industry deregulation), I found advocacy a great tool for getting things done.

“Now into my seventh year on the ADF Board, we are far from perfect but our policies are having better traction with Government than ever before,” Mr Evans said.

ADF wishes the retired Directors all the best as they look to spend more time with their families, travelling and on-farm.

Getting to know ADF Director, Simone Jolliffe

About Simone
Simone Jolliffe joined the Australian Dairy Farmers (ADF) Board in January 2014. Simone’s passion for agriculture was fostered by her family and a childhood spent on a cattle farm. Her interest in agriculture was further developed through her studies at the University of New England in Armidale, where she completed her Bachelor of Rural Science.

Raised on a beef property, Simone has embraced the commitment, intensity and challenges of dairy since joining her husband, Neil, on the Jolliffe farm in 2000. Situated on the Murrumbidgee River, near Wagga Wagga, NSW, Neil and Simone purchased the property in 2008. Farming with her husband and young family, Simone is involved in all aspects of the business from livestock and pastures, through to finances and human resource management.

Simone has been on the board of Dairy NSW since 2010, and became Deputy Chair in 2013. She is also the current Chair for the Inland Elite Dairy Network, and a mother to three school-aged children.

What challenges did you overcome shifting from beef farming to dairy farming when you married Neil?
The biggest challenge was the everyday commitment to dairy farming, most certainly the early morning starts! In terms of nutrition and livestock management, I was able to transfer these skills over quickly, however the human resource side has definitely been a challenge as the business has grown and we have engaged more staff.

Why is it important for you to be involved in all aspects of your dairy farm?
Neil and I are definitely a package deal, meaning that right from the outset we have always participated in joint decision-making. We also bring unique skills to the partnership.

After school I went on to further my studies at university, so I bring a different aspect when we’re reviewing decisions. Neil on the other hand, went straight from school to the farm. As a result, he has always had the hands-on experience and skills that I didn’t necessarily have when I began dairy farming.

This approach enables us to bring different perspectives to decision-making, contributing towards robust debate and ultimately, a business we are both proud of.

How important is grassroots support to ADF and the broader industry?
It’s the silver bullet! I ultimately think most things are grassroots driven – decisions don’t get made top-down without support from the grassroots level. That’s because ideas and original concepts are usually driven from a grassroots level, which are then refined through the process and improved upon, to ultimately be endorsed and implemented at a national level. We can’t lose that. It doesn’t matter wherever you are in agriculture, you cannot remove that grassroots culture and approach of individual thoughts, concepts and ideas.

You have previously described yourself as someone who is always prepared to “roll up your sleeves”, what does this mean and how do you think you apply this approach to your leadership role at ADF?
Once I’ve committed to something, I will do whatever it is that needs to be done. Developing DairyNSW’s Strategic Plan was an example of this, where I attended workshops in multiple NSW regions with an open ear to hearing the good and the bad from our stakeholders. Whilst there were many difficult conversations to be had, the most important part was being receptive to hearing the ugly truth – which I certainly did plenty of.

These awkward situations often take guts, yet they are so important to understanding and being able to address the real issues our farmers are faced with everyday. In this particular example, from the feedback I gathered, the DairyNSW Board felt positive that we were driving a strategic plan which encapsulated what our stakeholders wanted and we also had the right tools in place to accurately measure on delivering these outcomes.

What are some of the most important policy issues for ADF to focus on in 2015?
The National Farmers’ Federation (NFF) restructure is going to be really critical for us as an organisation, and it will be essential that we maintain engagement with NFF through this process. We need to have a clear understanding about what is imperative to our organisation and how this can be aligned with NFF.
In addition, we need to ensure there is effective consolidation of the last 12 month’s successful work, particularly around the China FTA outcome and ensuring it comes into fruition soon.

Being a busy mum, wife, dairy farmer and dedicated industry leader, how do you manage your time?
I am really well supported at home, with a very understanding husband and three very independent and capable children, who are very accepting of what mum does. I am also a ‘list girl’ who is meticulously organised knowing when things have to be done!

If you could impart a single line of advice onto Australian women working in dairy, what would it be?
Stand up and be counted.

It’s so important to ensure woman feel counted and not afraid to have an opinion or to speak up. Real results are achieved when different perspectives are considered – each of us has value to give.

I think dairy tends to be more accepting of the skills and knowledge women bring to the table than other commodities, and this has resulted in better gender balance representation at all levels from local discussion groups; to state and national levels.

We only have to look at DairyNSW’s 50/50 male and female split Board and two out of five of ADF’s Board Directors being female to see there is a huge amount of opportunity for women in dairy leadership roles.

goodreads.com
Goodreads | Susie Duncan Sexton's Blog - Got (almond) milk? Books, movies, politics, culture, and AGRIganda - February 04, 2015 12:37

New blog entry from Susie – quote: “Sometimes I feel the state of education/literature/culture, all the way around, is in the toilet. How does anybody ever get smart. In spite of it all I guess? I give up!” Read the rest at the link: https://www.goodreads.com/author_blog_posts/7817285-got-almond-milk-books-movies-politics-culture-and-agriganda

‪#‎vegan‬, ‪#‎kochbrothers‬, ‪#‎guncontrol‬, ‪#‎NRA‬, ‪#‎books‬, ‪#‎movies‬, ‪#‎wild‬, ‪#‎literature‬, ‪#‎warandpeace‬, ‪#‎religion‬, ‪#‎religiousfreedom‬, ‪#‎freedomfromreligion‬, ‪#‎agribusiness‬, ‪#‎factoryfarming‬, ‪#‎pigwrestling‬, ‪#‎vegetarian‬, ‪#‎animalrights‬, ‪#‎education‬, ‪#‎liberal‬, ‪#‎republican‬, ‪#‎democrat‬

Feeding the World - Starting at Home

Yesterday I had the privilege of presenting the Image Builder Award to the Webster, SD chapter of FFA during the state FFA convention in Brookings, SD.  What fun to spend some time in the company of teenagers who fit none of the stereotypes of their generation. Already they understand that the nutrition needs of the globe are theirs to shoulder for decades to come.

There’s a lot about this group that’s impressive. The leadership is young but articulate and commanding. As a body they are respectful, patriotic and charitable – not just through words, but deeds. The photo you see below is what they mean by “feeding the world, starting at home.”

 

 When I left the event, they had already packaged 53,000 meals. Meals that will feed people that cannot feed themselves. You see, when these kids put on those blue jackets, they put on so much more – an understanding that a good life is earned, then shared.

Not all of these kids will go on to be farmers, but they will all go on to contribute. If you are looking for a worthy organization to sponsor, maybe you can return the favor. http://paulsen.ag/IV99El