after-1945

4

About the historical importance of Nazi punching

The above pictures show the most famous Nazi-punching in German history. On the 7th of November 1968 Beate Klarsfeld, a French-German journalist and professional Nazi hunter, punched (well, slapped, rather) a disgusting Nazi right on the eye.

And this particular Nazi was no other than Kurt Georg Kiesinger, the federal chancellor of Germany at the time (which is the German head of government). Kiesinger joined the Nazi party NSDAP in 1933 and from 1940 on was deputy director of the department of broadcast politics in the Nazi State Department / Foreign Office.

After 1945 he managed to cover up his Nazi career and was elected as the third federal chancellor of Germany in 1966. Naturally, he tried to enforce reactionary and elitist policies, proceeding violently against the many protests at that time.

With the help of a forged press card Beate Klarsfeld gained entry to the party convention of the CDU (German conservative party) in 1968 and, in front of hundreds of politicians and journalists, punched the chancellor on the eye while yelling: “Nazi Kiesinger, abtreten!” (Nazi Kiesinger, resign!). She had to be forcibly removed from the building.

Because of this incident Kiesinger’s Nazi past became widely known among the German citizens, which prevented his re-election in 1969. Instead the social democrat Willy Brandt was elected new chancellor of Germany, who until this day is known as Germany’s most progressive chancellor, and who - as a member of the social democratic party  - had been persecuted by the Nazis, had to flee 1933 from the Nazi regime and had lived in exile until 1945.

tl;dr: Try to be as bad-ass as Beate Klarsfeld and punch Nazis on the eye, always, even especially if they’re high ranking politicians!

anonymous asked:

what is your opinion of taking the last of the species in the wild and putting them into zoos with the goal of eventually reintroducing there future offspring back into the wild

Very interesting question, theres examples where this worked but also some where this didnt worked

Where it worked

Przewalski’s horse (Equus ferus

After 1945 only two captive populations of the Prezwalki’s horse in zoos remained, in Munich and in Prague. By the end of the 1950s, only 12 individual Przewalski’s horses were left in the world. In 1977, the Foundation for the Preservation and Protection of the Przewalski horse was founded in Rotterda, the Foundation started a program of exchange between captive populations in zoos throughout the world to reduce inbreeding, and later began a breeding program of its own. As a result of such efforts, the extant herd has retained a far greater genetic diversity than its genetic bottleneck made likely.

In 1992, sixteen horses were released into the wild in Mongolia, followed by additional animals later on. One of the areas to which they were reintroduced became Khustain Nuruu National Park in 1998. Another reintroduction site is Great Gobi B Strictly Protected Area, located at the fringes of the Gobi desert. Lastly, in 2004 and 2005, 22 horses were released by the Association Takh to a third reintroduction site in the buffer zone of the Khar Us Nuur National Park, in the northern edge of the Gobi ecoregion.

Since 2011, Prague Zoo has transported twelve horses to Mongolia in three rounds and it plans to continue to return horses to the wild in the future. The Zoo has the longest uninterrupted history of breeding of Przewalski’s horses in the world and keeps the studbook of this species.

The reintroduced horses successfully reproduced, and the status of the animal was changed from “extinct in the wild” to “endangered” in 2005. On the IUCN Red List, they were reclassified from “extinct in the wild” to “critically endangered” after a reassessment in 2008 and from “critically endangered” to “endangered” after a 2011 reassessment.

California condor (Gymnogyps californianus

Condor numbers dramatically declined in the 20th century due to poaching, lead poisoning, and habitat destruction. A conservation plan was put in place by the United States government that led to the capture of all the remaining wild condors which was completed in 1987, with a total population of 27 individuals. These surviving birds were bred at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park and the Los Angeles Zoo. Numbers rose through captive breeding and, beginning in 1991, condors were reintroduced into the wild. The California condor is one of the world’s rarest bird species: as of December 2015 there are 435 condors living wild or in captivity.

Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx

The Phoenix Zoo and the Fauna and Flora Preservation Society of London are credited with saving the Arabian oryx from extinction. In 1962, these groups started the first captive-breeding herd in any zoo, at the Phoenix Zoo, sometimes referred to as “Operation Oryx”. Starting with 9 animals, the Phoenix Zoo has had over 240 successful births. From Phoenix, oryx were sent to other zoos and parks to start new herds.

Arabian oryx were hunted to extinction in the wild by 1972. By 1980, the number of Arabian oryx in captivity had increased to the point that reintroduction to the wild was started. The first release, to Oman, was attempted with oryx from the San Diego Wild Animal Park. Although numbers in Oman have declined, there are now wild populations in Saudi Arabia and Israel, as well. One of the largest populations is found in Mahazat as-Sayd Protected Area, a large, fenced reserve in Saudi Arabia, covering more than 2000 km2.

In June 2011, the Arabian oryx was relisted as vulnerable by the IUCN Red List. The IUCN estimated more than 1,000 Arabian oryx in the wild, with 6,000–7,000 held in captivity worldwide in zoos, preserves, and private collections.

Where it didnt work

Thylacin (Thylacinus cynocephalus)

The Thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus) was the largest known carnivorous marsupial of modern times. It is commonly known as the Tasmanian tiger or the Tasmanian wolf. Native to continental Australia, Tasmania and New Guinea, it is believed to have become extinct in the 20th century

The last captive thylacine, later referred to as “Benjamin”, was trapped in the Florentine Valley by Elias Churchill in 1933, and sent to the Hobart Zoo where it lived for three years. The thylacine died on 7 September 1936. It is believed to have died as the result of neglect—locked out of its sheltered sleeping quarters, it was exposed to a rare occurrence of extreme Tasmanian weather: extreme heat during the day and freezing temperatures at night.

Quagga (Equus quagga quagga

The Quagga was an extinct subspecies of plains zebra that lived in South Africa until the 19th century.

After the Dutch settlement of South Africa began, the quagga was heavily hunted as it competed with domesticated animals for forage. While some individuals were taken to zoos in Europe, breeding programs were unsuccessful. The last wild population lived in the Orange Free State, and the quagga was extinct in the wild by 1878. The last captive specimen died in Amsterdam on 12 August 1883.

So you see this can go either way but i would say overall if it helps the species im for it because nature conservation is very important to me

In the Heart of the Storm (Part 5)

Bucky x Reader

Summary – You are house-sitting for some friends on the Chesapeake Bay in the middle of a hurricane. Unbeknownst to you, you’re not alone. Takes place immediately following the events of Captain America: The Winter Soldier. 

Warnings – None

Word Count – 1,260

Notes – As usual, I’m taking a lot of liberties with Bucky in this fic.  None of us know just how much he actually remembers, or when those memories starting coming back.  I have a plan on where I want this fic to go, so I need him to remember certain things to get us there.  As always, I appreciate all of your feedback and questions!!!

Part 1  

Series Masterlist

Masterlist

Previously:

At the mention of the Helicarriers, his head shot up.  His eyes were wide, and you could practically see the memories flooding back into his mind. “Steve.  Oh my God, Steve.  Is he dead?”

“Steve?  Do you mean Steve Rogers, Captain America?”

With every word you spoke, his face seemed to crumple.  He looked down at his left arm in disgust as he flexed the metal fingers.  “What did I do?”

“Oh my God, you’re the guy that almost killed Captain America.”  You didn’t wait for him to confirm or deny your statement.  Without thinking about the consequences, you turned and ran for door behind you.


 

You made it to the back porch, your feet mere inches from the grass when a cold metal arm wrapped around your waist, pulling you up against a solid wall of muscle.  His right hand clamped over your mouth as he effortlessly carried your struggling form back into the house.  

Keep reading

2

Victory Day (9 May)

Victory Day is a holiday that commemorates the victory of the Soviet Union over Nazi Germany in the Great Patriotic War. It was first inaugurated in the 16 republics of the Soviet Union, following the signing of the German Instrument of Surrender late in the evening on 8 May 1945 (after midnight, thus on 9 May Moscow Time). The Soviet government announced the victory early on 9 May after the signing ceremony in Berlin. Though the official inauguration occurred in 1945 the holiday became a non-labour day only in 1965 and only in certain Soviet republics.

In East Germany, 8 May was observed as “Liberation Day” from 1950 to 1966, and was celebrated again on the 40th anniversary in 1985. In 1975, a Soviet-style “Victory Day” was celebrated on 9 May. Since 2002, the German state of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern has observed a commemoration day known as the “Day of Liberation from National Socialism, and the End of the Second World War”.

After regaining their independence from the Soviet Union, the Baltic countries now commemorate the end of World War II on 8 May, the Victory in Europe Day. [Read More]

Grumman TBM Avenger torpedo bomber, flying from an offshore aircraft carrier, takes in an eagle eye view of Mount Suribachi on Iwo Jima, three weeks after D-day. March 1945.

(Photo source - Naval History and Heritage Command)

(Colorized by Irootoko Jr. from Japan)

2

In honour of Liberation Day in the Netherlands, let me tell you something about Willem Arondeus, homosexual activist, anti-fascist artist and writer and member of the Dutch Resistance during the occupation of Nazi Germany.

During the early Nazi occupation of the Netherlands, Willem realised that the demand by the Nazis that all Jewish people register with local authories was not, as the Nazis claimed, for their own safety, but to deport them to concentration camps. 

Willem was one of the first to join the Dutch Resistance and together with numerous other artists, he created an illegal periodical that called for mass resistance against the German occupation.

As a member of the Resistance Council – which also included other openly gay members – he put his artistic skills to use by forging tons of identity papers and recruiting new members. In March 1943, Willem led a group in bombing the Amsterdam Public Records Office in order to hinder the Nazis.

Willem dressed as a Nazi Army captain and with the group, he disabled the guards by drugging them and positioned the explosives, destroying thousands of files.

Within a week after the bombing, he and the other members were arrested and sentenced to death after a short trial. On July 1st 1942, Willem was executed. Shortly before his execution, however, he told his lawyer the following:

‘’Tell the people that homosexuals are not cowards.’’

In 1945, after the Dutch Liberation by the Allied forces, Willem was awarded a posthumous medal by the Dutch government and was reburied in a honorary cemetry.

2

“British pilot rescued after Pacific action. June 1945, on board a carrier of the British Pacific Fleet operating against the Japanese. A British naval pilot who was shot down close inshore was rescued by a Supermarine Walrus amphibian aircraft which landed under the guns of Japanese coastal batteries, picked up the Avenger pilot and returned him to the deck of the carrier.”

(IWM: A 29813, A 29719)

The Brandenburg Gate in Berlin, May 1945, after the allied seizure of the city at the end of the Second World War. Almost 200,000 soldiers died in the battle for the city, which ended after Adolf Hitler committed suicide and Germany surrendered. Soviet troops engaged in a brutal campaign of retribution for all that the Germans had done to the USSR. Over one million Berliners were left homeless after the fall of the city.

Dictatorship is not a weapon of capital (as if capital could replace it with other, less brutal weapons): dictatorship is one of its tendencies, a tendency realised whenever it is deemed necessary. A “return” to parliamentary democracy, as it occurred in Germany after 1945, indicates that dictatorship is useless for integrating the masses into the state (at least until the next time). The problem is therefore not that democracy ensures a more pliant domination than dictatorship: anyone would prefer being exploited in the Swedish mode to being abducted by the henchmen of Pinochet. But does one have the choice? Even the gentle democracy of Scandinavia would be turned into a dictatorship if circumstances demanded it. The state can only have one function, which it fulfils democratically or dictatorially. The fact that the former is less harsh does not mean that it is possible to reorient the state to dispense with the latter.
—  When Insurrections Die - Gilles Dauve
So I was rereading the Fantastic Beasts textbook...

… And there was something that got me wondering. Newt loves all of his Beasts. “None of the creatures in that case are dangerous!” Even including the erumpent and the Nundu (which his book describes as, “Possibly one of the most dangerous beast in the world.”). He cares so much about all of them. 

But according to the About the Author, Newt was also responsible for the creation of the Werewolf Registry. The thing that stopped Remus Lupin from being able to live like a real person for most of his life. 

Why would Newt create something so vile?

Why does Newt seem to hate werewolves? Unless…

We know this happened in 1947. After the franchise ends (1945). We know Newt and Tina are still alive and in the 90′s. But we know nothing about the futures of Queenie, Jacob, Leta, or Credence…

What if one of them gets killed by a werewolf? Maybe even a werewolf Newt had defended. Stood up for. Trusted.

Newt just wants to protect the Magical Creatures of the world. He doesn’t understand people as well, but he wants to protect them too. Just what would it take to break that?