african-governance

“The Emancipation of women is not an act of charity, the result of a humanitarian or compassionate attitude. The liberation of women is a fundamental necessity for the revolution, a guarantee of its continuity and a precondition for its victory.” Speech delivered in 1973 by Samora Machel, revolutionary leader of FRELIMO and first Head of State of Mozambique. He was killed 29 years ago today in a plane crash arranged by the apartheid South African government. A Luta Continua!

anonymous asked:

do you think good presidents actually existed in america? like carter for example.. but also im hesitant to say that bc its not as if imperialism or anything disappeared under any president

There are no “good presidents.” America is a fundamentally illegitimate settler-colonial state created via the genocide of Indigenous peoples and built with the stolen labor of enslaved Africans. As such, their governments & any representatives they elect are also illegitimate.

Dangerous Woman- Part 12

A/N: I actually enjoyed this part….

Warnings: Swearing/Fluff

Summary: You’ve caught the eye of Tony Stark to become the head lawyer for the Avengers. You never expected your life to change but fate has a funny way of turning everything upside down. 

Bucky x Reader 

Part 11/ Masterlist

Originally posted by thespoilerwitchblog

Keep reading

I missed The Daily Show this week, but watched the highlights. Christ. Trevor Noah pointing out that the deeply racist apartheid South African government 100% disavowed the Neo-Nazis, when even Trump won’t, was stunning. (I had no clue about that one.)

Partly why Noah is such a great host.

Occasionally he’ll casually drop in some story or anecdote from his childhood that makes your jaw drop.  

4

The Freedom Train and the Contagion of Liberty, 1947-1949

Seventy years ago this week, the Freedom Train began its trek across America, carrying a rolling exhibit of 126 historically important documents, including the Bill of Rights.

But as the train headed south, concerns grew about the insistence that there were would be no segregated viewing of the exhibits. Americans would see the documents “regardless of race, creed, or color” at the same time–or not at all.

Keep reading at  The Freedom Train and the Contagion of Liberty, 1947-1949 | Rediscovering Black History

In 1997 the South African government passed a law setting up, among other things, a marketplace for medicines based on affordable prices. Clause 15c relied on two practices agreed under the World Trade Organisation’s guidelines.

One, compulsory licensing, allows businesses in a country in a state of emergency to manufacture generic products paying only a royalty to the patent owner. The second, parallel importing, lets a nation import drugs made more cheaply in one country than in another.

Patent rights for the HIV cocktail would cost the South African health service an inconceivable $10,000 per Aids patient. Using the mechanisms under Clause 15c would reduce the costs by between 50 and 90 percent.

But the legislation was labelled ‘piracy’ by Pharma - the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America. This is a formidable alliance of the nation’s 100 biggest drugs companies. They claimed the South African law would violate patents and undermine profits on which research depended.

For a battle against a government led by the world’s most popular leader, Pharma needed political clout, and chose a consultancy called Podesta .Com.

It chose well. What was formerly Podesta Associates was founded by two brothers from Chicago, John and Anthony, and rated by Washingtonian magazine among the top 20 lobbying groups in the capital.

Both men were heavy-hitting Democrats, both had the President’s ear and were especially close to Gore. Both were members of President Clinton’s transition team when he took office in 1992. John remained at the White House, later becoming Chief of Staff, while Tony streamlined the company. ‘We Help You Change Outcomes’ was his slogan.

The Clinton administration, with John Podesta as Chief of Staff, went to war over South Africa’s anti-Aids drive. Trade Representative Charlene Barshevsky denied South Africa tariff breaks on its exports to the US. Gore told Nelson Mandela to his face that the US would not tolerate the legislation.

South Africa refused to back down, and the pharmaceutical companies intervened directly. They sued: led by Pharma, the massive Bristol Myers Squibb from the US, Britain’s SmithKline Beecham and Glaxo (through its South African subsiduary), Germany’s Bayer, Roche of Switzerland, France’s Rhne-Poulenc and a host of others.

Nelson Mandela was born on July 18, 1918, near the South African town of Qunu. He lived a fairly prosperous life as a child, attending private schools and then college. He finished college while working as a law clerk in Johannesburg.⠀
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After the elections in 1948, the apartheid political system became the law of the land in South Africa. Under this system, the country was divided along racial lines, with one area known as White South Africa, another as Black South Africa, and so on. Everything having to do with government, including voting, education and so forth, was divided along racial lines. As a result, whites controlled every aspect of the South African government.⠀
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Mandela started working peacefully against apartheid, but he was arrested for the first time in 1956, accused of treason along with 150 others. All were eventually set free, but the arrest had an effect. By the 1960s, influenced by his time in prison and other events like the Sharpeville Massacre, Mandela’s peaceful ideas changed. He led an armed resistance that used techniques such as the destruction of government property to fight against apartheid. It was for these acts that he was arrested and imprisoned in 1962.⠀
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Why did Mandela get so much attention? Part of it has to do with Mandela’s leadership position in the armed struggle. But another part of it has to do with his wife, Winnie Mandela. While Nelson was in prison, Winnie campaigned very publicly for his release, and her pleas resonated around the world.⠀
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The breakthrough came in 1989, when then-president P.W. Botha lost his office due to a stroke he suffered. Botha’s replacement, F.W. De Klerk, released Nelson Mandela from prison in 1990. De Klerk then oversaw the dismantling of the apartheid system. De Klerk and Mandela shared the Nobel Peace Prize in 1993 for their combined efforts to end apartheid.⠀
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Because Mandela had so much public recognition in 1994’s new democratic South Africa, he was elected president in the first free election. https://www.instagram.com/p/BWtYEbgFply/

theguardian.com
Intellectual property laws demand a 21st-century solution
The health and wellbeing of people should be put before corporate profits
By Joseph Stiglitz

When the South African government attempted to amend its laws in 1997 to avail itself of affordable generic medicines for the treatment of HIV/Aids, the full legal might of the global pharmaceutical industry bore down on the country, delaying implementation and extracting a high human cost. South Africa eventually won its case, but the government learned its lesson: it did not try again to put its citizens’ health and wellbeing into its own hands by challenging the conventional global intellectual property (IP) regime.

Until now. The South African cabinet is preparing to finalise an IP policy that promises to expand access to medicines substantially. South Africa will now undoubtedly face all manner of bilateral and multilateral pressure from wealthy countries. But the government is right, and other developing and emerging economies should follow in its footsteps.

Over the last two decades, there has been serious pushback from the developing world against the current IP regime. In large part, this is because wealthy countries have sought to impose a one-size-fits-all model on the world, by influencing the rule-making process at the World Trade Organization (WTO) and forcing their will via trade agreements.

The IP standards advanced countries favour typically are designed not to maximise innovation and scientific progress, but to maximise the profits of big pharmaceutical companies and others able to sway trade negotiations. No surprise, then, that large developing countries with substantial industrial bases – such as South Africa, India and Brazil – are leading the counterattack.

These countries are mainly taking aim at the most visible manifestation of IP injustice: the accessibility of essential medicines. In India, a 2005 amendment created a unique mechanism to restore balance and fairness to patenting standards, thereby safeguarding access. Overcoming several challenges in domestic and international proceedings, the law has been found to comply with WTO standards. In Brazil, early action by the government to treat people with HIV/Aids resulted in several successful negotiations, lowering drug prices considerably.

(Continue Reading)

3

September 12th 1977: Steve Biko dies

On this day in 1977, South African anti-apartheid activist Steve Bantu Biko died aged 30 while in police custody in Pretoria. Biko founded the Black Consciousness Movement and coined the famous phrase “black is beautiful”. He had been a target long before his arrest on August 18th 1977, having been censored and ‘banned’ by the apartheid government in 1973 and had his movement in his country restricted. Upon his arrest, Biko was brutally tortured and beaten during police interrogations which lasted almost 24 hours, eventually dying from head injuries on September 12th. The police claimed he died due to a hunger strike, but it was clear his death was caused by police violence after his arrest. The authorities’ flimsy protestations of innocence fooled very few, and the truth about Biko’s death caused widespread outrage. His killers were never bought to justice, but due to his high-profile Biko’s family were able to secure financial compensation from the South African government. He was a hero of black South Africans for his activism, but since his tragic death Steve Biko has also become a martyr for his cause and a symbol of the anti-apartheid movement.

“They had to kill him to prolong the life of apartheid”
- Nelson Mandela on Steve Biko

Black And Brilliant: 21 Celebs Who've Attended Ivy League Schools

The brilliant celebs who attended Ivy League schools.

Brian White

The actor and former stockbroker graduated from Dartmouth College, where he was a member of Beta Theta Pi fraternity.

Source: Essence

Shonda Rhimes

The television genius earned her bachelor’s at Dartmouth, where she joined the Black Underground Theater Association and directed and performed various productions.

Source: Essence

Toni Morrison

Morrison earned her master’s at Cornell after graduting from Howard with a B.A. in English.

Source: Essence

Lupita Nyong'o

Nyong'o graduated with a master’s from the Yale School of Drama, where she earned the Herschel Williams Prize for her acting.

Source: Essence

Bob Johnson

The BET founder earned his master’s in public affairs at Princeton University.

Source: Essence

Joy Bryant

Bryan attended Yale after graduating from the small, private Westminster School, a boarding school in Connecticut.

Source: Essence

Sanaa Lathan

Lathan earned her bachelor’s at the University of California, Berkley, before a graduating from Yale with a master’s in drama.

Source: Essence

Hill Harper

Harper has three Ivy League degrees. He graduated magna cum laude from Brown University, graduated cum laude with a Doctor of Jurisprudence degree from Harvard Law School, and received a master’s in public administration from Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government.

Source: Essence

Ryan Leslie

The recording artist earned a perfect score on his SATs, which landed him acceptance letters from Stanford, Harvard, and all four University of California campuses. He graduated from Harvard with a degree in government, focusing on macroeconomics and political science. He was selected as the Harvard Male Orator, one of four seniors to deliver orations to the graduating class.

Source: Essence

Rashida Jones

Jones initially planned to become a lawyer before studying philosophy and religion while at Harvard.

Source: Essence

Courtney B. Vance

The actor and Emmy winner earned his bachelor’s from Harvard University and later received his master’s at the Yale School of Drama.

Source: Essence

Angela Bassett

The Golden Globe-winning actress has a degree in African American studies from Yale. She also obtained her master’s from the Yale School of Drama.

Source: Essence

Tammi Terrell

During a brief hiatus from music, the late singer attended the University of Pennsylvania, where she studied pre-med.

Source: Essence

Aisha Tyler

Tyler graduated from Darmouth, where she was a member of The Tabard, a co-ed fraternity. She also co-founded and sang in the a cappella group, Dartmouth Rockapellas, an all-female group of singers spreading social awareness through music.

Source: Essence

Alicia Keys

The Grammy-winning singer graduated from the Professional Performing Arts School at 16 as valedictorian and later pursued an education at Columbia University. She left the school to focus on music after signing with Columbia Records.

Source: Essence

John Legend

The Grammy-winning singer was offered admission to Harvard, Georgetown, and Morehouse, but decided to attend the University of Pennslyvania, where he studied English with a focus on African American literature.

Source: Essence

Nikki Giovanni

The poet and activist attended graduate school at the University of Pennsylvania and Columbia University.

Source: Essence

Tyra Banks

Banks completed a nine-week program at Harvard Business School back in 2012, earning a certificate. She returned in 2014 for a non-degree certificate program while working on her beauty brand, Tyra Beauty.

Source: Essence

Tracee Ellis Ross

Ross earned a theatre degree from Brown.

Source: Essence

Yaya DaCosta

The runner up during America’s Next Top Model’s third season and star of Chicago Med, DaCosta has a degree in Africana Studies and International Relations from Brown University.

Source: Essence

Tatyana Ali

Ali earned a degree in African-American studies and government from Harvard.

Source: Essence

Track record of European Social Democracy viz. the Global South

”At the Sixth Congress of the Comintern in Moscow (July through September 1928), Social Democracy was high on the agenda. There Ercoli – Palmiro Togliatti, late head of the Italian Communist Party – made his detailed report on “Social Democracy and the Colonial Question”, to which reference has already been made…

“Most instructive is Togliatti’s documentation of Social Democracy’s specific record in, and policy toward, colonies. A summary of his documentation is essential context for all the discussion which follows:

“IN SYRIA, whose “complete independence” the Second International had once demanded, the French Socialist Party voted for the war appropriations for imperialist expeditions, during which French generals massacred the populations of Damascus and other towns.

“IN INDONESIA, the Dutch Socialists warned “their” government that a revolt was coming; and once it came, not only did they “not defend in parliament this bloody revolt”, they severely condemned the spirit of the revolt “whether it originated in Moscow or Canton”. When mass death sentences brutally suppressed the revolt, Dutch Socialists boasted of disapproving only death sentences “merely for propaganda”. That is, they approved death for workers and peasants who “gave cause”, i.e., who revolted.

“IN AFRICA, the record of British Social Democracy is too long to be covered in less than a book. The specific story of the Clement Atlee Labour Government from 1945 to 1951 has, however, been given in detail by Jack Woddis:

“IN SUDAN, the Labour Government sent warships to terrorize the population, instructing British authorities to “do everything necessary to maintain order”.

“IN KENYA, the Atlee Government record by itself is enough to damn Social Democracy once and for all. At Mombasa in 1947, the African Workers’ Federation and the Railway Staff Union called a general strike for higher wages and lower house rents. They were joined by hotel, shop and domestic workers. And what happened?

The Colonial Office under the Labour Government acted with the same ruthlessness as under any Tory Government. Police and troops were called in, the strike was suppressed, and the President of the African Workers’ Federation, Chege Kibachia, was banished without trial to a remote village in Northern Kenya.

“At Uplands Bacon Factory in September 1947, when another strike broke out the police were again called in. They fired on the workers; 3 dead, 22 arrested, including 20 sentenced to two years at hard labour.

“In September 1948, Makhan Singh, Secretary of the Labour Trade Union of East Africa, organised a Cost of Living Conference. Delegations came from more than 16 trade unions and associations, representing more then 10,000 African and Asian workers. The Labour “leaders” of Britain arrested Singh and deported him.

“During 1949 and 1950, new legislation was introduced into Kenya, of which the following six were typical:

1) A Wage-Freezing Bill, “The Compulsory Trade Testing and Wage Fixing Scheme”;

2) A Trade Union Registration Ordinance;

3) A “Slave Labour” Bill, introducing forced labour at starvation wages;

4) A Deportation Ordinance, giving Government increased power to deport;

5) A law banning strikes in “essential services”: all the Governor had to do to make any strike illegal was to add its industry to “essential services”;

6) The already-existing Emergency Powers Ordinance was amended to increase the Governor’s powers.

“The result, Woddis declared, was a series of attacks on Kenya’s trade unions, including the arrest of leaders of the East African Workers’ Federation, of the East African T.U.C., and an eventual ban on the latter on pretext that “it was not registered”.

“IN NIGERIA, official Social Democratic policy resulted in the shooting of coal miners at Enugu in 1949. 7,500 miners had struck for higher pay, allegedly a common Social Democratic demand. Outcome? 231 dead, 50 wounded. In the ensuing mass counter-demonstrations, further repressions and wholesale arrests took place.

“IN TANGANYIKA, strikes occurred in 1948 at Port Tanga, and in 1950 at Dar-es-Salaam, the latter involving the Dock Workers’ Union. The Labour Government promptly outlawed the union, confiscating all its funds and property, and arrested and imprisoned its leaders, During the same period, the leadership of African Cooks’ and Washermans’ Union of Tanganyika was removed as “unsatisfactory”.

“IN GHANA, a demonstration of unemployed ex-servicemen ended when police fired on it, killing three, In 1949 and 1950, a general strike as last push to independence saw mass arrests, including Dr. Kwame Nkrumah and others later part of Ghana’s first African Government.

“The colonial record of Harold Wilson’s Labour Government since 1964 is written in the names of countries it betrayed: Congo Kinshasa, Aden, Malaysia, British Guiana, South Africa, Southern Rhodesia, Southwest Africa, Bechuanaland – and on and on.

“Furthermore, these examples form a pattern by which Social Democracy in power fully reveals its real colonial policy: as in Wilson’s present Government, it does all in its power to make a mockery of such political independence as colonial countries had achieved despite all interference.

“Brutality, both economic and military, is the major weapon of Social Democracy’s colonialism, exactly the same – if not worse than – ANY imperialist government…

“Actually, brutal measures by Social Democracy against colonial peoples are quite logical considering what they accomplish for the metropolitan labor aristocracies whom Social Democracy represents. Precisely because the Labour Government had destroyed all attempts by colonial workers to improve their living standards, it could be recorded that

The economic position in Britain improved in 1952 because there was a world-wide fall in the price of food and raw materials which benefited the British economy.

“What the author neglected to add was that colonial economies depend heavily for their incomes precisely on “the price of food and raw materials”, and the benefit to the British economy resulted because colonial economies had been rendered more lopsided than before.

“SUCH brutality never seems to upset the Western Left nearly as much as the selfsame instrument turned against “its own” workers in the streets “at home”, when for some reason or other the colonial cushion has either been removed by military defeat or not attained because of later arrival by the specific ruling class on the capitalist world scene.

“Yet, surely it must be clear by now that Social Democracy will use brutality as one effective modus operandi whenever necessary to ensure continued super-profits. Even though new forms of colonialism have had to be devised to meet the advance of the Liberation movement throughout the subjugated areas of the world, the casualties go on; brutality escalates.”

– From Labor Aristocracy: Mass Base of Social Democracy by H.W. Edwards (1978)

theguardian.com
How drug giants let millions die of Aids
Revealed: Ed Vulliamy reports from Washington on how the pursuit of profit by Western companies - and their political allies - stalled South Africa's fight against HIV, and sees the tragic cost in the townships.


In 1997 the South African government passed a law setting up, among other things, a marketplace for medicines based on affordable prices. Clause 15c relied on two practices agreed under the World Trade Organisation’s guidelines.

One, compulsory licensing, allows businesses in a country in a state of emergency to manufacture generic products paying only a royalty to the patent owner. The second, parallel importing, lets a nation import drugs made more cheaply in one country than in another.

Patent rights for the HIV cocktail would cost the South African health service an inconceivable $10,000 per Aids patient. Using the mechanisms under Clause 15c would reduce the costs by between 50 and 90 percent.

But the legislation was labelled ‘piracy’ by Pharma - the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America. This is a formidable alliance of the nation’s 100 biggest drugs companies. They claimed the South African law would violate patents and undermine profits on which research depended.

For a battle against a government led by the world’s most popular leader, Pharma needed political clout, and chose a consultancy called Podesta .Com.

It chose well. What was formerly Podesta Associates was founded by two brothers from Chicago, John and Anthony, and rated by Washingtonian magazine among the top 20 lobbying groups in the capital.

Both men were heavy-hitting Democrats, both had the President’s ear and were especially close to Gore. Both were members of President Clinton’s transition team when he took office in 1992. John remained at the White House, later becoming Chief of Staff, while Tony streamlined the company. ‘We Help You Change Outcomes’ was his slogan.

The Clinton administration, with John Podesta as Chief of Staff, went to war over South Africa’s anti-Aids drive. Trade Representative Charlene Barshevsky denied South Africa tariff breaks on its exports to the US. Gore told Nelson Mandela to his face that the US would not tolerate the legislation.

South Africa refused to back down, and the pharmaceutical companies intervened directly. They sued: led by Pharma, the massive Bristol Myers Squibb from the US, Britain’s SmithKline Beecham and Glaxo (through its South African subsiduary), Germany’s Bayer, Roche of Switzerland, France’s Rhne-Poulenc and a host of others.

(continue reading)

Vidoe.TV

Mogadishu rocked by twin car bombs

External image

More than 22 people have been killed in a double car bomb attack in the capital of Somalia.

Several others have been injured in the blasts in Mogadishu, according to police.

Inaa Lilaahi Wainaa ileyhi raajicuun, ugu yaraan 20 Qof ayaa geeriyootay dad intaas kabadan wey dhaawacmeen Qaraxa ka dhacay #Mogadishu pic.twitter.com/wv6FlV6V9o— Ismael Mukhtar Omar (@imukhtaar) 14 octobre 2017

Busy areas

The first explosion, in the city’s K5 Junction area which is lined with government offices, hotels and restaurants, destroyed several buildings and set dozens of vehicles on fire.

“It was a car bomb. Two civilians were killed,” said police major Siyad Farah, before adding that a suspect had been caught on suspicion of planting explosives.

About two hours later, a second blast shook the city’s Madina district.

Has anyone admitted staging the attacks?

Not yet. There was no immediate claim of responsibilitiy, although the Islamist al-Shabaab group has carried out regular attacks.

The al Qaeda-allied group is waging an insurgency to topple the weak, UN-backed government and its African Union allies and impose its own strick interpretation of Islam.

They frequently launch gun, grenade and bomb attacks in Mogadishu and other regions controlled by the federal government.

In recent years, the militants have lost most territory under their control to African Union peacekeepers and government troops.

What they are saying

“We know at least 20 civilians are dead while dozens of others are wounded,” – police officer Abdullah Nur.

“Gender ideology has become the perverse condition for cooperation and development…. I have noticed the existence of international programs that impose abortion and the sterilization of women. These policies are all more hideous because most African populations are defenseless, at the mercy of fanatical Western ideologues. The poor are asking for a little aid, and some people are cruel enough to poison their minds. Africa and Asia absolutely must protect their cultures and their own values. International agencies in fact have no right to practice this new Malthusian, brutal colonialism. Out of ignorance or complicity, African and Asian governments would be guilty of allowing their people to be euthanized. Mankind would lose much if these continents were to fall into the huge, formless magma of a globalization, which is directed toward an inhumane ideal that is in fact a hideous, barbaric oligarchy.”

- Cardinal Robert Sarah, God or Nothing

godzillaapproved  asked:

Hello from that earlier post about Haiti being ignored: why out of all the West Indian countries, is Haiti hated on the most by West Indians? Is it because of colorism, colonialising mindsets?

Yes colonization plays a role! I know between Haiti and the Dominican Republic they’re biggest problem with Haiti is that we embrace our African roots and blackness where as they prefer to associate with their Latin roots rather than acknowledging their African heritage. Haiti was the first black nation to defeat their colonizers. No other black nation has done that. Countries like U.S and France made sure to make an example out of Haiti for daring to be free simply bc they were African slaves. They couldn’t fathom that these African slaves could govern themselves so they made it difficult. Haiti has been at the butt of every joke for a long time and has always been the underdog yet we led the fight for black liberation. I think people simply don’t know their history about Haiti and prefer to believe what media and some white man wrote in a text book rather than learn facts. Colorism plays a huge role too. The Caribbean has a major colorism issue which is due to colonization. Lightening creams and movements trying to lighten the race. Someone once posted a photo of pictures of women from Jamaica, Trinidad, Bahamas, and Haiti. All women were light mixed looking except Haiti she was dark and people made a joke of that I don’t know why bc she was still beautiful but I guess she was too dark which can be seen as you know ugly and undesirable especially in these Caribbean islands. There’s deff colorism in Haiti but not to the extent of other islands I’d say. Idk for the most part I notice Haitians are very in touch with their African roots and accept their blackness!

anonymous asked:

Brother Diallo, how is it that the British making up less than one half of one percent of the world population were able to colonize nearly the entire world? You posted that picture showing that only 22 countries were untouched by the British. So how is it that Black folk who have way more numbers than the British can't take over the world? Do questions of majority or minority even matter?

Short Answer: Cuz Whites have unrelenting ill-intent and pathological aggression; and yes questions of majority and minority do matter.

Long Answer: Well, that’s kind of a complex question.

People tend to think that White folks simply took over the world, the showed up and just took shit over; but it was actually a long drawn out process, full of death and failure for the British.

But look at it like this; when you body is infected with a bacteria or virus that it has not immunity against, or a metastatic cancer; you health cells still way out number the diseases cells; but you still get sick as fuck, and it take time for your immune system to catch up.

That’s basically the history of British Imperialism.

Dr. Thom Hartmann literally stated that: “the Europeans impact on the world and other cultures has been much like a virus acting upon a body.” Dr. Hartmann is a White dude, a really White dude, so it ain’t just Black militants who’ve drawn this conclusion.

As for as Black folks being ill-prepared to face such an enemy:

Dr. John Henrik Clarke stated that; “the African had never encountered such an enemy, and enemy that would greet you in friendship, be welcomed in your home, sit and eat your food, then proceed to cut your throat, rape your wife, and enslave your children.” (Paraphrase)

So, that’s it in a nutshell, unquenchable ill-intent & aggression imposed on a world that had not encountered such a culture before, over whelmed the people.

The Process was also highly deceptive and systematic.  The West often arrived as friends, then begin to erode their victims defenses and plot against them.  There’s an old saying that “when a con man and an honest man do business the con man always wins.”

So, during the “first Thanksgiving” the Natives were just eating turkey, while the Pilgrims were eating turkey and plotting conquest.  

The West took over the world in segments, tribe by tribe, region by region, nation by nation; they would employ the help of some Natives against other Natives, then turn on the Natives that allied against them once they were able.  It’s was just pure evil, really fucking deplorable shit at the root of the Grand Western Conquest of the World.

Now, the rest of the world we not a peaceful utopia when Whites arrived….some regions were but…, whatever, but the nature of War and the mentality, and the cultures, and the pathogens that the West brought had never been experienced outside of Eurasia; we just were not ready.

There are also flaws withing African Cultures and Governing Systems that made…still make us particularly vulnerable to Western Aggression and Imperialism, but that’s just too much to get into here.

The good news is, Global White Domination started eroding the moment it was established. Western Empires are the news, and will be the shortest lived Empires in the world.  Check out Chalmers Johnson’s series on US/Western Imperialism; he breaks it all down.  Johnson was a White, Right-Wing, Cold-Warrior; so he ain’t about to sugarcoat shit to make Blacks feel better. 

The West is done!

The one problem is, how much of the world’s ecosystems will remain, will the planet be able to support complex lifeforms during and after the Fall of the West.

That’s why we, all of humanity need to accelerate the Fall of all of the Systems and Institutions of Global White Domination, not just watch it happen, we must also purge the Western Contamination of our indigenous cultures and practices or they might take the rest of us down with them. 

We are also  seeing the emergence of Whites who get it, who stand in opposition to Global White Domination, the are teaching among their communities and fighting for their own survival; so there’s a change for us and the rest of the lifeforms that inhabit earth. 

A Caboclo couple from Manaus in the state of Amazonas, Brazil.

The term Caboclo is the Brazilian equivalent to the Mexican racial concept of a Mestizo, or the Canadian racial designation of a Métis; a person of mixed Native American and European ancestry.

In the Brazilian national racial narrative the two main races focused on are whites and blacks, with those of Indigenous descent and culture often overshadowed. However, the Caboclo’s were Brazil’s first racially-mixed group, starting from the 16th century when the Portuguese king, Joseph I of Portugal, encouraged intermixing between Portuguese colonizers and Native Brazilian women. Much of the Caboclo population was centered in the Northeast of the country, until Brazil’s first and second rubber boom, when white and Caboclo people from that region were compulsorily drafted to harvest rubber in the Amazon. These people were not permitted to leave the Amazon and were forced to settle there permanently. This resulted in more miscegenation between people of European and Native descent, distinguishing it from the North-Eastern region where people of African and mixed black descent were far more common. For this reason, most of the Caboclo’s of today are located in the northern states of Brazil such as Amapá, Amazonas, Pará, and Tocantins.

As mentioned above, people of Amerindian and mixed Amerindian descent are often overshadowed in Brazilian society. This has gone as far as to cause erasure of the Caboclo’s by the Brazilian government. On the Brazilian census the official category for people of mixed-race ancestry is “pardo” (brown), and since most mixed-race people in Brazil are of European and African descent, certain government agencies group all pardos as Afro-Brazilians. Thus many Caboclo’s who have no African ancestry at all are presented as Afro-Brazilians, and issues concerning them alone as a racial minority group are ignored by the state in favor of the Afro-descended minority groups.  

youngyorubasage  asked:

Greetings, why do you think western media is obsessed with portraying Africa the way it does?

Cuz it validates Capitalism and White Domination.  

The corporate Western media seeks to show Africans as unfit or incapable of self-governance, show African nations as impoverished and unable to get beyond petty/tribal conflicts; which absolves the West of their past and ongoing crimes against Africans and Africans.

If Africans were not inherently dysfunctional then we’d have to look elsewhere to explain the conditions in much of Africa and we’d have to employ solutions beyond NGO & foreign nations intervention into Africa’s affairs.

Classic victim blaming scenario.   

Most Western media portrayals of Africa are Anti-African Propaganda.

Oh, and the West wants to sustain the rift between African and the African Diaspora; while reinforcing the inferiority of the African Diaspora by promoting they false inferiority African nations.