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“WHAAAT?! WHITE PEOPLE DO NOT APPROPRIATE OTHER CULTURES THAT’S CRAZY. REVERSE RACISM REVERSE RACISM! AND EVEN IF THEY DID THIS IS A FREE COUNTRY I CAN WEAR WHATEVER. THAT DOESN’T MAKE ME DISRESPECTFUL! SO WHAT. AHAJJABGAnigganigganiggaHABBALAYGEVBWB! I HAVE LOTS OF DIFFERENT COLORED FRIENDS! FUK U BRO! I CAN DO WHATEVERTR.”

White privilege is just a play-word so they don’t have to say racism/white supremacy, which supports privilege. White supremacy is what supports the privilege. White supremacy means power. So, to talk about privilege, without talking about white supremacy is like playing games.
—  Dr. Frances Cress Welsing, African-American psychiatrist
“I want to set forth this proposition, which will be easier to reject than refute: Black people will never gain full equality in this country. Even those herculean efforts we hail as successful will produce no more than temporary ‘peaks of progress,’ short-lived victories that slide into irrelevance as racial patterns adapt in ways that maintain white dominance. This is a hard-to-accept fact that all history verifies. We must acknowledge it, not as a sign of submission, but as an act of ultimate defiance.”

—Derrick Bell, “Faces at the Bottom of the Well”, p.12, 1992
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Derrick Albert Bell, Jr. (November 6, 1930 – October 5, 2011) was the first tenured African-American Professor of Law at Harvard Law School and is largely credited as one of the originators of critical race theory (CRT). He was a Visiting Professor at New York University School of Law from 1991 until his death. He was also a former Dean of the University of Oregon School of Law.

HI!

My name is Sammie, I am a research assistant working with Drs. Karen Suyemoto  and Tahirah Abdullah , psychology professors at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. On the behalf of my team, we would like to invite you to participate in our study.

We are currently conducting a much needed study examining experiences of racism, and reactions to these experiences. This study is an online survey that will take about 30-45 minutes.

To participate in this study, (1) you must be over 18, (2) understand written English, and (3) identify as a person of color or racial minority. Participation is completely voluntary and you can stop at any time without risk of any negative consequences. As a “thank you” for completing the survey, you are eligible (1) to be entered into a raffle for one of several $200 gift cards, or (2) choose to have the researchers make a $10 donation to an organization advocating for social justice.

If you are interested in participating in our study, please visit tinyurl.com/race-study. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact us at aart@umb.edu.

We want to thank you in advance for your time and consideration.

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Equality for All Races in Sports, Except Native Americans

“Only with your help can we stop racism in sports.” - a PSA brought to you by the Redskins.

More about George Washington Carver:

  • Carver was born into slavery
  • Carver attempted to enroll at Highland College in Kansas but was rejected because of his skin colour
  • Carver saved money and enrolled at Simpson College in Iowa where he excelled in academic subjects and impressed many.
  • Carver was a talented artist.
  • Etta Budd was the name of his art teacher. She encouraged Carver to study Botany at Iowa State Agricultural College in Ames.
  • Carver was the first black student at that institution.
  • Carver impressed his professors and encouraged him to remain as a graduate student.
  • Carver obtained his Master of Agriculture degree in 1896.
  • Carver believed that he could use his training as an agricultural chemist to help improve the lives of poor Southern farmers.
  • The products Carver derived from peanuts range from cosmetics to dyes. 
  • Carver also developed products from other plant products.

George Washington Carver: artist, chemist, botanist, educator, and inventor.

(American Chemical Society Page about George Washington Carver)