african-american-studies

The Gals in college.

 I’ve been asked this a 100 times so..

  1. Hope Solo –> School: Washington ; Major: Speech Communications
  2. Syd Leroux –> School: UCLA ; Major: History
  3. Cap America –> School: Monmouth ; Major: Special Education
  4. Becky Sauerbrunn –> School: UVA ; Major: English
  5. Kelley O’Hara –> School: Stanford ; Major: Science, Technology and Society
  6. Whitney Engen –> School: North Carolina ; Major: Political Science
  7. Shannon Boxx –> School: Notre Dame ; Major: Psychology/African-American Studies
  8. Amy Rodriguez –> School: USC ; Major: Psychology
  9. Heather O’Reilly –> School: North Carolina ; Major: Education
  10. Carli Lloyd –> School: Rutgers ; Major: Exercise Science and Sport Studies
  11. Ali Krieger –> School: Penn State ; Major: Advertisement/Public relations
  12. Lauren Holiday –> School: UCLA ; Major: Sociology
  13. Alex Morgan –> School: UC Berkeley ; Major: Political Economy
  14. Morgan Brian –> School: UVA ; Major: Kinesiology
  15. Megan Rapinoe –> School: Portland ; Major: Sociology
  16. Lori Chalupny –> School: North Carolina ; Major: Sociology
  17. Tobin Heath –> School: North Carolina ; Major: Communications
  18. Ashlyn Harris –> School: North Carolina ; Major: Communications
  19. Julie Johnston –> School: Santa Clara ; Major: Communications
  20. Abby Wambach –> School: Florida ; Major: Leisure Service Management
  21. Alyssa Naeher –> School: Penn State ; Major: Kinesiology
  22. Meghan Klingenberg –> School: North Carolina ; Major: Business Administration
  23. Christen Press –> School: Stanford ; Major: Communications/Psychology
  24. Emily Sonnett –> School: UVA ; Major: Sociology
  25. Kealia Ohai –> School: North Carolina ; Major: Journalism and mass communication
  26. Crystal Dunn –> School: North Carolina ; Major: Sociology
  27. Sam Mewis –> School: UCLA ; Major: English
  28. Casey Short –> School: Florida State ; Major: Criminology
  29. Andi Sullivan –> School: Stanford ; Major: Management Science and Engineering
  30. Jane Campbell –> School: Stanford ; Major: Psychology
  31. Rose Lavelle –> School: UW ; Major: Sociology
  32. Lindsey Horan –> SKIPPED COLLEGE TO GO PRO

The Assassination of the Black Male Image


by Earl Ofari Hutchinson


“A compelling expose of the truth behind society’s racial and sexual stereotypes of black men, this book offers a wide historical perspective and insights into such recent racially charged events as the Clarence Thomas hearings, the O.J. Simpson trial, and the Million Man March. Hutchinson brilliantly counters the image of black men as a population entrenched in crime, drugs, and violence.”

But only a few of those who dance and sing with us suspect the rawness of life out of which our laughing-crying tunes and quick dance-steps come; they do not know that our songs and dances are our banner of hope flung desperately up in the face of a world that has pushed us to the wall.
—  Richard Wright, “12 Million Black Voices”
youtube

ANGELA DAVIS ON VEGANISM AS PART OF A REVOLUTIONARY PERSPECTIVE

“Angela Davis is a political activist, academic scholar, and author. She emerged as a prominent counterculture activist and radical in the 1960s as a leader of the Communist Party USA, and had close relations with the Black Panther Party through her involvement in the Civil Rights Movement.

Her research interests are feminism, African-American studies, critical theory, Marxism, popular music, social consciousness, and the philosophy and history of punishment and prisons.”

Monster: The Autobiography of an L.A. Gang Member by Sanyika Shakur, Kody Scott “After pumping eight blasts from a sawed-off shotgun at a group of rival gang members, twelve-year-old Kody Scott was initiated into the L.A. gang the Crips. He quickly matured into one of the most formidable Crip combat soldiers, earning the name “Monster” for committing acts of brutality and violence that repulsed even his fellow gang members. When the inevitable jail term confined him to a maximum-security cell, a complete political and personal transformation followed: from Monster to Sanyika Shakur, black nationalist, member of the New Afrikan Independence Movement, and crusader against the causes of gangsterism. In a document that has been compared to The Autobiography of Malcolm X and Eldridge Cleaver’s Soul on Ice, Shakur makes palpable the despair and decay of America’s inner cities and gives eloquent voice to one aspect of the black ghetto experience today.” #books #monster #theautobiographyofanlagangmember #sanyikashakur #kodyscott #afrocentricbooks #afrocentricliterature #afrocentricstudies #africanamericanstudies #africanamericanliterature #africanamericanbooks #blackbooks #blackliterature #blackstudies

I have the most vivid memories of being seven years old and my mom picking me up from my grandmother’s house. There were the three of us, a family tree in an ombré of mocha next to the caramel complexion of my mom and light-skinned, freckled me. I remember the sense of belonging, having nothing to do with the color of my skin. It was only outside the comforts of home that the world began to challenge those ideals. I took an African-American studies class at Northwestern where we explored colorism; it was the first time I could put a name to feeling too light in the black community, too mixed in the white community. For castings, I was labeled ‘ethnically ambiguous.’ Was I Latina? Sephardic? ‘Exotic Caucasian’? Add the freckles to the mix and it created quite the conundrum. To this day, my pet peeve is when my skin tone is changed and my freckles are airbrushed out of a photo shoot. For all my freckle-faced friends out there, I will share with you something my dad told me when I was younger: ‘A face without freckles is a night without stars.’

Nobody Knows My Name
by James Baldwin

“Told with Baldwin’s characteristically unflinching honesty, this collection of illuminating, deeply felt essays examines topics ranging from race relations in the United States to the role of the writer in society, and offers personal accounts of Richard Wright, Norman Mailer and other writers. ”

10

Y’all better quit sleeping and learn your history. The police forces in this country aren’t suddenly wilding out - they are doing WHAT THEY WERE ORIGINALLY CREATED TO DO. They are doing WHAT THEY HAVE ALWAYS DONE. And, soberly, they will continue to do WHAT WE ALLOW THEM TO DO until we fight back.

“I am a marked woman. In order for me to speak a truer word concerning myself, I must strip down through layers of attenuated meanings, made in excess, over time, assigned by a particular historical order and there await the marvels of my own inventiveness." 

-Hortense Spillers "Mama’s Baby, Papa’s Maybe” in Black, White and In Color: Essays on American Literature and Culture

The phenomenal Hortense Spillers, an indefatigable source of inspiration.

The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America
by Khalil Gibran Muhammad

“Lynch mobs, chain gangs, and popular views of black southern criminals that defined the Jim Crow South are well known. We know less about the role of the urban North in shaping views of race and crime in American society.

Following the 1890 census, the first to measure the generation of African Americans born after slavery, crime statistics, new migration and immigration trends, and symbolic references to America as the promised land of opportunity were woven into a cautionary tale about the exceptional threat black people posed to modern urban society. Excessive arrest rates and overrepresentation in northern prisons were seen by many whites liberals and conservatives, northerners and southerners as indisputable proof of blacks inferiority. In the heyday of separate but equal, what else but pathology could explain black failure in the land of opportunity ?

The idea of black criminality was crucial to the making of modern urban America, as were African Americans own ideas about race and crime. Chronicling the emergence of deeply embedded notions of black people as a dangerous race of criminals by explicit contrast to working-class whites and European immigrants, this fascinating book reveals the influence such ideas have had on urban development and social policies.”

( this is one of those books everyone should read, if for nothing else, the fact that you’ll rarely find a book that has this amount of information in one book)

The denigration of love in black experience, across classes, has become the breeding ground for nihilism, for despair, for ongoing terroristic violence and predatory opportunism… . [We thus must address] the meaning of love in black experience today, calling for a return to an ethic of love as the platform on which to renew a progressive anti-racist struggle, and offering a blueprint for black survival and self-determination.
—  Bell Hooks, In Salvation: Black People and Love
Racial “subjection” is quintessentially ideological. Everybody learns some combination, some version, of the rules of racial classification, and of her own racial identity, often without obvious teaching or conscious inculcation. Thus are we inserted in a comprehensively racialized social structure. Race becomes “common sense” - a way of comprehending, explaining, and acting in the world. A vast web of racial projects mediates between the discursive or representational means in which race is identified and signified on the one hand, and the institutional and organizational forms in which it is routinized and standardized on the other. These projects are the heart of the racial formation process.
—  Racial Formation in the United States - Michael Omi and Howard Winant

In 1987, more than 400 protesters marched at University of California, Berkeley, to call for the creation of a graduate program in African American Studies. November 6, 1987.

African American students at University of California, Berkeley, demand a graduate-level program in the Afro-American/Ethnic Studies department. Despite a concurrent weakening of institutional support for affirmative action in higher education, UC Berkeley students pressed forward on a multicultural agenda. In 1986, a student-led movement successfully convinced the Regents of the University of California to fight apartheid by divesting three billion dollars in their endowment and retirement stock portfolio of companies doing business with South Africa. A Ph.D. program in African Diaspora Studies was approved for African American Studies until 1996.

The Lost Cities of Africa
by Basil Davidson

“Combining archeological evidence and scholarly research, Davidson traces the exciting development of the rich kingdoms of the lost cities of Africa, fifteen hundred years before European ships first came to African shores.”

( I have issues with the title but this is a very good book)