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First Artificial Insemination Was An Ethical Nightmare

During the first successful artificial insemination in 1884, a woman was chloroformed in front of six medical students and the “most attractive” student gave his semen. She had come to Dr. William Pancoast due to her inability to conceive. Pancoast worked with her, but eventually determined it was her husband’s low sperm count that was the issue. Rather than do something like, I don’t know, tell them? The doctor instead decided to do a surprise artificial insemination! Neither the husband nor the wife was told. She became pregnant after one last “treatment” with Dr. Pancoast and gave birth to a healthy baby boy nine months later.

When the child was born, Pancoast told the husband the truth of the child’s parentage. They mutually decided not to tell the woman – who had carried the child in her body for nine months – what had happened. Great ethics, Mr. Doctor! In fact, no one besides the six medical students, Dr. Pancoast, and the husband knew what they had done because everyone swore an oath of secrecy.

Twenty-five years later, one of the medical students contacts the now-grown baby. He wants to write an article about what had happened. For science and the advancement of medicine and all that. The child was a 25-year-old businessman living in New York, the medical student kindly informed him of the details of his conception, before going off to publish that article. His letter in Medical World describing the case hit the newsstands in 1909. And as far as anyone knows, that’s how the poor mother found out her child’s parentage.

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Nearly 60 percent of Americans admit knowing nothing at all about Sikhs. That lack of knowledge comes at a deadly cost. In the wake of recent incidents from the 2012 Oak Creek Massacre to a shooting of a Sikh man in Washington this March, the Sikh community is taking a more vocal stand against hate.

This month, the National Sikh Campaign, an advocacy group led by former political strategists, launched a $1.3 million awareness campaign, “We are Sikhs.” Funded entirely by grass-roots donations, the campaign’s ads will air nationally on CNN and Fox News as well as on TV channels in central California — home to nearly 50 percent of the Sikh American population — and online.

The ad, which aims to tackle misperceptions of Sikhism, shows Sikh men and women speaking about how values of their faith — tolerance, religious freedom and gender equality — align with American values. According to Gurwin Singh Ahuja, the executive director of the National Sikh Campaign, “These are core values of the United States, yet we’re often perceived as anti-American or as religious extremists. Our community is hurt by bigotry and ignorance, which is, in many ways, compounded by our own silence. To change these perceptions, I felt we had an obligation to share our stories with our neighbors.”

Why American Sikhs Think They Need A Publicity Campaign

JK Rowling gets so much hate for lack of racial representation in Fantastic Beasts, but from what I’ve seen it’s mostly non-British people who complain about it. You do realise that JKR is English, as am I, and we don’t get told anything at all about American history? Like ever? She could have researched, but that doesn’t mean she gets to change the entire cast just for you. You guys wouldn’t be happy if she did anyway. Stop thinking you’re entitled to say who to cast in movies based on HER books and HER world.