african knowledge

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Unlike Oprah’s network, which broadcasts talk shows, soaps and sitcoms, Beyonce’s is likely to have an educational focus instead … platform is said to create content designed to celebrate African and American studies.

American School system won’t include black history in the books? So Bey is here. #Love it!

Basically the era where being thicker than a midget was a crime just because Africans happen to be thick. Sarah (Saartije) Baartman was a Khoisan (South African) woman who performed under the name “Hottentot Venus” in 19th century England and France. She is the original video vixen: discovered at home in South Africa during her late teens, she was offered money and fame in Europe as a singer and dancer. Little did she know that she would be exploited and put on display for everyone to gaze at her large butt, long clitoris/labia, small waist, big breast and kinky hair– all traits that are very common amongst Khoisan women. As her shows attracted more fans, she was forced against her will to have sex with men AND WOMEN who gave enough money to her exploiters. Sarah got none of the money, as she was once promised. After her act got old, she was forced into prostitution, where she died of std’s and alcoholism. The obsession with Saartije lasted after her death as well. For more than 100 years, visitors and “scientist” were able to examine her dissected body parts in Paris museums. The 19th century shapewear, the “bustle” was inspired by her in order to give european women her unique physique. Yes, an old school booty pop. On behalf of Nelson Mandela’s request, Paris returned Saartije’s remains to South Africa in 2002. Black men, it’s time that you start respecting the black woman’s body, because this act of objectifying it was taught to you. #sarahbaartman

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93 years ago on this day May 31, 1921, the Tulsa Race Riot began. It is marked as the deadliest race riot in the history of the U.S. & destroyed what was known as, Black Wall Street.

Black Wall Street was the wealthiest black community in the United States, full of black owned businesses consisting of: 

movie theaters 
dental offices
independent newspapers
restaurants
grocery stores
a bank
post offices
a bus system
schools
airplanes
law offices 
its own hospital.

Racial tension boiled over on May 30, 1921 when a white woman accused a black boy of sexual assault. Late that night, a mob of nearly 10,000 white men launched an all out assault on Black Wall Street systematically burning down every home & business. 

Attacks came from both the ground and the sky as the mobs used planes from World War I to drop firebombs and shoot at residents. African Americans that were captured were held in internment camps around the city by local police & National Guard units.

Blacks who were injured during the 16 hour attack couldn’t seek medical care because the mobs torched the only black hospital in the city.

The attack left about 10,000 African Americans homeless and 35 city blocks burned to the ground. In total, 1,256 houses & 191 businesses (including churches, a middle school & a hospital) were burned. 

In the aftermath, it was estimated that 300 African Americans were killed and many of their bodies were buried in unmarked graves.

The Tulsa Race Riot was taught for the 1st time in Tulsa public schools in 2012. #NeverForget #BlackWallStreet #BlackHistory

A lone African-American student waits for class to start at a newly integrated high school. Robert W. Kelley. Clinton, Tennessee, 1956

That’s courage right there. If anyone asks what it looks like. #Love it!

We have to Teach our young Black Girls what it means to be a Black woman at a young age. We have to understand that whether we like it or not, they will encounter racism. They will encounter a school system that takes away their roots. They need to know the royalty that they come from. They must be taught the importance of embracing their Black Gifts. They need to learn about our revolutionary warrior queens so that they will be able to survive in this White Man’s World. They need to know that to be a Black Woman in your natural state is to have become a Goddess.

Written by @KingKwajo

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Following the Civil War, black Americans, through employment as musicians playing European music in military bands, developed new musical styles such as ragtime and what would become known as jazz. In developing this latter musical form, African Americans contributed knowledge of the sophisticated polyrhythmic structure of the dance and folk music of peoples across western and sub-Saharan Africa. Together, these musical forms had a wide-ranging and profound influence over the development of music within the United States and around the world during the 20th century.

Remembering the influence of black artists in American music.

atlantablackstar.com
10 Black Scholars Who Debunked Eurocentric Propaganda - Atlanta Black Star

Dr. Cheikh Anta Diop Senegalese-born Cheikh Anta Diop (1923 – 1986) received his doctorate degree from the University of Paris and was a brilliant historian, anthropologist, physicist and politician and one of the most prominent and proficient black scholars in the history of African civilization. Contrary to the long-standing European myth of a Caucasian Egypt,  Diop’s …

forharriet.com
15 Books About Black Women's History Everyone Should Read

Educate yourself.

This is a super great list of great books. I encourage you to check it out. Here’s the first five books:

1.Ain’t I a Beauty Queen?: Black Women, Beauty, and the Politics of Race by Maxine Craig

2.Ar'n’t I a Woman?: Female Slaves in the Plantation South by Deborah Gray White

3.At the Dark End of the Street: Black Women, Rape, and Resistance–A New History of the Civil Rights Movement from Rosa Parks to the Rise of Black Power by Danielle McGuire

4.Beauty Shop Politics: African American Women’s Activism in the Beauty Industry by Tiffany Gill

5.But Some Of Us Are Brave: All the Women Are White, All the Blacks Are Men: Black Women’s Studies by Gloria T. Hull

Be mindful that when you increase your Knowledge and expand your awareness, you automatically function and think on a higher level than those around you who are not doing anything to better themselves. You may start to experience distance between you and the people you commonly associate with—friends, associates and family. This is natural; do not let it stop you. Soon you will attract people into your life that are also elevating themselves and you won’t feel lonely. There is a great African proverb that states, “You can not soar with the eagles when you walk amongst chickens.”
—  Naazir Ra, The Hidden Power

A few years ago I read a book by Merlin Stone called When God Was a Woman, in which she wrote that ‘in the beginning, people prayed to the Creatress of Life, the Mistress of Heaven. At the very dawn of religion, God was a woman…the female deity in the Near and Middle East was revered as Goddess—much as people today think of God…the original status of the Goddess was as supreme deity…the Great Goddess was regarded as immortal, changeless, omnipotent; and the concept of fatherhood had not yet been introduced into religious thought.’

As a critical thinker, I know that sometimes a lie is told when the truth is declared halfway or haphazardly. Stone, who happens to be a White female artist and college professor, never mentioned the racial make-up of the female divinities of the world’s earliest civilizations she wrote about. I don’t know understand how Stone could write a book about When God Was a Woman and then later write a book on Three Thousand Years of Racism, which focuses on uncovering evidence of racism imposed by Indo-Europeans after they conquered most of the same regions discussed in When God Was a Woman, and fail to connect the probability that the Goddesses she first wrote about were originally depicted as Black women. How can she admit that ‘historical, mythological and archaeological evidence suggests that it was these northern people who brought with them the concepts of light as good and dark as evil (very possibly the symbolism of their racial attitudes toward the darker people of the southern areas) and of a supreme male deity;’ but not admit that the Goddess of theses Black people was also Black before they and She were conquered by White people (i.e., Indo-Europeans). 

Whether this failing was accidental or intentional is irrelevant, yet one could assume that the Goddesses would originally resemble the people who worship them. According to Albert Churchward, ‘the earliest members of the human race appeared in the interior of the African continent about two million years ago, then from the region of the Great Lakes they spread over the entire continent. Groups of these early men wandered down the Nile Valley, settled in Egypt, and then later dispersed themselves to all parts of the world…As these early Africans wandered over the world, they differentiated into the various human subspecies that now inhabit our planet. The men who remained in the tropical and equatorial regions retained their dark complexions, whereas those that settled in the temperate zones lost a portion of their dusky pigmentation and developed a fairer skin.’ Provided that the original racial profile of the Nile, Indus, and Tigris-Euphrates River Valley as well as the Aegean civilizations has been clandestinely confirmed as Black/African, then the female divinities worshipped in these civilizations should also logically be Black/African. Accordingly, in the beginning, to revise Stone, God was a Black woman.”

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Black Men from the very beginning it was bestowed upon our hands to leave a legacy. We were the first men on earth; the first teachers, the first parents; we were the first. It is up to us to raise a generation of Strong Black Boys. It’s our duty to teach them exactly what it means to be a man because throughout our enslavement and brainwashing those lessons have been lost. Only we can raise a new generation of young Black Kings. Let’s leave our legacy of greatness just as we did before. Written By @KingKwajo