african influences

The Appropriation of Black Culture in K-Pop/K-Hiphop

Okay so if you don’t know, a lot of k-pop and k-hip hop has a lot of African American influence in it. When I show music videos to my parents they are surprised at how black culture has expanded all over the world now.

But there is a difference between influence and Appropriation. There are a lot of black k-pop/hip hop fans, and we love to see how our culture influences others. But sometimes people cross the line.

For example earlier today FOMO Daily posted a video of Rae Sremmurd vs MOBB. Although I didn’t watch the video I read the comments. A lot of people were mad at how people get uncomfortable/upset when non-black people wear dreads. A lot of people tried to explain the reasoning but some people just weren’t understanding.

Yes, black people are going to get upset when non-blacks wear dreads, braids, etc. We as a people have always been made fun of for our big curly hair or our dreads, or our cornrows. We were told it looked nasty or unkept. But it those are ways we protect our hair from damage, etc. We are denied jobs for wearing our natural hair. We are discriminated against because of our hair. And just because you don’t see it happen or because it’s never happened to one of your black friends, that doesn’t mean it doesn’t happen. So when we see other people wearing it we’re gonna get pissed off. It’s not just a style that will come and go, it’s our culture. It’s like when people wear War Bonnets. That’s Native American culture not just a style. It’s disrespectful.

And going off of that, let’s talk about the word “nigga”. HELL YEA we’re gonna get pissed off when non-black people say it. Most people don’t even know the history of the word. During the slave trade people couldn’t pronounce the words “Nigeria” “Niger” and “Nigerian” so the word “Nigger” came about and was used as an offensive term towards blacks people. We took the word changed the spelling and gave it a new meaning. So no, if you’re not black don’t say “nigga”. How hard is it to refrain from saying one word??

There is a lot of controversy with idols saying “Nigga”. The only thing they have to do is apologize and admit they were wrong for saying it.

So we have no problem with the influence. In fact it’s very exciting and cool to see how our culture has touched all parts of the world. But there’s always a line that shouldn’t be crossed.

- From your fave unapologetically black admin, Zar 💕

Revelation (Hamilsquad x Reader)

A/N: Hey, my babies. Mama is home!! I just want to thank you all once again (WE HIT 1K) and remind y’all of the AskHam happening tomorrow. You can hit my inbox up with asks starting tonight and I’ll get started tomorrow (or tonight if I get too excited to wait). I have been working on this request for the LONGEST TIME…I am excited to share it. I do think it could be better but…here it is anyway! Let me know what you think?

Warning(s): Cursing; A bit of sauciness; A bit of Google translated French

WC: 2265+

Relevant Fact: The Alvin Ailey School of Dance (located in New York) was founded by choreogrpaher Alvin Ailey in 1969 and their dance numbers are heavily influenced by African-American spirituals, sermons and gospel. 

Links: These videos were used as inspiration and are not mine: Fix Me Jesus and Needed Me


I stand in the wings of the stage, my nerves all over the place. It’s almost time for my duet with Tony and I am about to panic. It’s the first part of the show, “Pilgrim of Sorrow”, and Tony and I are doing the “Fix Me Jesus” portion of the song. I don’t doubt that he and I can successfully execute this duet with minimal error, we’ve been practicing for weeks. I’m just afraid of what my boys will think.

This is their first time seeing me dance. They know that I do dance heavily influenced by African-American spirituals, sermons, gospel and things of that nature, but they don’t know what all of that exactly entails. Besides…I didn’t exactly tell them that I was doing a duet. Knowing them, this may not end well.

The song before ours ends and the stage goes black, giving us just enough time to get into position. The lights go up and the song begins. Luckily, the house is dark so I can’t see into the audience. My mind goes completely blank and I focus on Tony and I’s movements.

The dance itself is slow. Not in a sensual way, but in a way that is technical but graceful. Our bodies seem to depend on each other for each movement we make. The dance is an act of teamwork so there has to be some level of chemistry and comfort. For the message of this song to resonate, it must be as if we are one. The different moves we make carry an emotion that we have to focus to get across.

When it gets to the part I am sure the boys will hate, I don’t hesitate in executing it fully. When Tony hinges backward I do the same and he walks backward on his hands, guiding me into a sitting position. I reach upward, as if trying to grasp at something, then Tony pushes me upward. My right leg is on relevé and the left is extended upward.

Tony spins me around slowly until I am facing him and he lays back, suspending me in the air with his arms still on my waist and his legs holding mine up. I contract into him twice before rising up and kicking backward. After that, the rest of the song goes by fairly quickly for me, as does the rest of the show, and the next thing I know I am being shoved into a yellow dress and hat for the last three numbers.

We breeze through them and the final bows are taken. When the curtains close we all file off the stage and pack for home. We congratulate each other and tease each other and say farewell until practice next week. Upon exiting the backstage area and entering the lobby, a few people linger to ask for autographs.

One woman in particular says–

“Oh! The chemistry was visible, honey! I loved it! Is there anything going on between you and that young man,” she gushes. “I could swear there is! So much chemistry! I loved it, I really did.”

I smile at her kindly and sign her program. “I’m glad you enjoyed the show, ma’am. That means so much.”

She gives me a quick hug before running over to Keiley, the umbrella bearer for “Wade in the Water” and talking her ear off. I send her a small smile and shrug when she looks over to me with wide eyes. When I turn around, my boys are standing there. I give them a tired smile.

“Hey, guys. You ready to–”

I am cut off by Tony jumping on my back.

“I know good and damn well you weren’t leaving without telling me bye were you?”

I shove him off of me, chuckling. “Piss off, Tony. I see you every day. But hey, let me introduce you.”

He throws an arm over my shoulder as I introduce him to my boys.

“This Hercules, John, Alex, and Lafayette,” I say, smiling. “They’re my boyfriends.”

“Nice to meet you all,” Tony says, stretching his hand out. However, the boys just stare at him menacingly. Silent hostility rolls off of them in waves. Tony awkwardly places his hand at his side. “Tough crowd.”

I frown. “Yeah…well, you better get back to Sasha,” I say, pulling him into a hug. “See you next week.”

“Sure thing, sugar,” He says, hugging me back quickly before skipping off.

I turn back to the boys, my face turned up in confusion and annoyance.

“What’s with you guys? That was so rude,” I say, placing a hand on my hip. “Tony is a cool guy.”

“Let’s go,” Alexander grits out, taking my dance bag. I scowl, taking the bag back.

“What the hell is up with you,” I say. I glance at the boys. Their faces are stone cold. “What the hell is up with all of you?”

“Let’s go,” Alex says sharply, snatching the bag from me. He turns on his heel and exits the building, then John takes the other bag and follows him. Hercules and Lafayette escort me out of the dance hall behind them. I am placed in the backseat between Herc and Laf as John and Alex put my things away. When everyone is in the car, I immediately start trying to defuse the situation.

“Guys–”

“Save it,” John snaps. I roll my eyes, crossing my arms.

“You guys are being childish.”

“Childish? No,” Alex says, starting the car and peeling out of the parking lot. “We’re pissed, sweetheart. Fucking pissed.”

“Over what? I come off of the stage after a performance and you guys don’t even tell me if it was good or not. You just snap at me. If anyone should be pissed, it’s me,” I retort.

“How would you feel if some girl were all me at one of my shows,” Lafayette snaps. “And then sauntered up right in front of you after the show and was all over me then too?”

“So you guys are jealous. Oh my fucking–”

“Why would we be jealous? Just because some attractive guy was all over our girlfriend? Nah, we aren’t jealous,” John says sarcastically.

“Oh my God, guys! Come on. It isn’t that big of a deal! It was just a duet.”

“So why didn’t you tell that woman that there was nothing going on? When she asked, why didn’t you tell her that it was ‘just a duet’,” Hercules asks. His voice is low and steady. He is fucking livid.

“I don’t have to answer to some woman I barely know. Besides, if you were paying attention, the woman was talking a mile a minute.”

“No excuse. You should’ve said something! We came out to support you tonight, not to see you cuddled up with some dancer dude,” Alex nearly shouts.

“Don’t you dare fucking yell at me, Alexander Hamilton. I did nothing wrong,” I say, my anger rising. “It’s you all flying off of the handle over nothing. If you would let me explain–”

“Ne pas. There is no need,” Laf cuts in. “We know what we know.”

“But–”

“Leave it alone,” Herc says sternly. “You’ve done enough.”

I look up to him in disbelief. If anyone were to be on my side, I thought it would be Hercules. I glare at him before staring down at my lap in anger.

The rest of the car ride is silent.

When we get home, the boys file into the house with me behind them. Once inside, however, I storm past them and head for my room. Alexander grabs my arm.

“Where are you going? We need to talk.”

I snatch my arm from him. “Don’t grab me like that, Alexander. Besides, now you wanna hear what I have to say?”

“Yes,” Laf chimes in. “We want to know what’s going on with you and the danseur. Vous deux avez la chimie. Why is that?”

“It doesn’t matter why we have chemistry. What matters is that you guys don’t trust me,” I snap. “I tried to tell you what was up in the car but you weren’t hearing it. I’m done.”

“Baby, please,” John says, his voice seeimgly calm.

“Don’t ‘baby’ me. I wasn’t your baby when you were talking at me in the car now was I,” I say, crossing my arms. “All I wanted was for you all to see me do what I do and be proud!”

Each of them hung their heads, hopefully feeling properly chastised. I sigh.

“Don’t worry about coming to the next show,” I say, turning around and exiting the room.


When I wake up the next day, it’s to the sound of our house bumping with music.

“What the hell,” I mutter as I slip on some pants and a bra and pad into the living room. I nearly die when I see the boys dancing to “Pon De Replay” with none other than Tony leading them through a simple routine. I shake my head, chuckling at the sight before me.

Hercules notices me first and grins, pausing the music.

“Why the fuck did you pause the music in my rehearsal, Mr. Mulligan,” Tony says, turning around. Noticing me, he smiles. “Oh, hey, girl. What’s good?”

“You tell me,” I say with a small smile. “What is this, guys?”

John steps forward. “Well…we felt bad about last night…,” He starts.

“So we got a hold of Tony and asked him to teach us some moves to make it up to you,” Lafayette finishes.

“We’re really sorry, baby,” Hercules adds.

“Really. We were acting like jackasses last night,” Alex says. “Mostly me.”

“I see…well. Make it up to me. Show me what you’ve got boys,” I say, taking a seat on the couch. Tony switches the song to “Can We Dance”.

I’m not sure what I was expecting but their routine is absolutely wonderful! The moves aren’t complicated but they are certainly more advanced than I would’ve thought they could handle. Tony taught them well! During one part of the song, the boys got a chance to showcase their own moves. It was clear that John was the most comfortable up there dancing but the others were great as well.

By the end of their mini-performance, I was grinning from ear to ear.

“So,” Alex says breathlessly. “What did you think?”

I look between each of the boys, watching their nerves build as I form my next words.

“I loved it,” I squeal. “Oh my gosh! It was so freaking cute!”

“Hold on, cute? My choreography was cute? I know not,” Tony complains, giving me bitch face.

“Lose the ‘tude, peasant,” I say, standing. “Yeah, it was cute.”

Tony purses his lips. “‘Ight. Since my shit was cute, why don’t you show your boys something hot?”

“Sit down, boys,” I say, glaring playfully at Tony.

They scramble to the couch. Tony smirks, changing the song.  “Needed Me” starts blaring through the speakers. I smirk back, turning to my boys as I start the number. I won’t lie, I did way more than what Tony taught in class a while back. But what can I say? I wanted to make them squirm in their seats.

Let’s just say that by the end of the song, the boys were in a rush to get Tony out of the front door.

“I am going! I’m going damn! I get all of you laid and fix your relationship and this is the thanks I get,” Tony shouts as he’s shoved to the door. “Oh my! Herc you’ve got quite the p–”

John slams the door in his face before he can finish that sentence.

“Well. I’m gonna go shower,” I say walking away.

“Oh no, Princess. You’re not going anywhere,” Hercules says, stalking towards me. The others follow suit, their eyes lustful. My eyes widen and I take off down the hallway.

“Get her!”

I turn the corner, hoping to make it to the bathroom before–

“Gotcha!”

“Aw man,” I whine, as John drags me back into the living room. He flops me on the couch and my boys gather in front of it, looking down at me.

“Tell us where you learned to dance like that, kitten,” Alex says.

My eyes flit between the four of them, not sure if I should answer or not.

“Speak up, babygirl,” John says. “He asked a question. We know you didn’t learn that at Alvin Ailey.”

I bite my lip. “Tony taught me the routine,” I say quietly. Laf looks confused.

“Tony?”

“Yeah…he and his boyfriend, Sasha, choreograph almost all of our hip hop routines. I do some and Keiley does some. We have another dance team outside of Ailey.”

“Hold on, Princess, you mean to tell me that Tony was gay this entire time?”

“I knew he was checking me out,” John exclaims. I laugh.

“Oh yeah, Tony is hella gay. I was the first person he came out to.  That’s why we’re so close.”

“Ohh,” They all say, their eyes widening with realization. They murmur amongst themselves about the turn of events and I try to slip away quietly. I almost make it around the corner but alas, the universe is against me today.

“Not so fast, little girl,” Laf says, pulling me to the middle of the floor before returning to the couch. Hercules flips on the stereo and takes a seat by Alex. John saunters over to me, a smirk playing at his lips.  

“Let’s give them another show, babygirl. Dance with me,” he whispers.

African Influence in Salvador

Salvador, capital of the state of Bahia, was the first major port and the capital of colonial Brazil for almost two centuries. The city lies between green tropical hills and broad beaches along the bay of Todos os Santos. It was built on two levels with administration buildings and residences constructed on the hills; forts, docks, and warehouses on the beaches. To this day the city is still divided into upper and lower cities. From 1500 to 1815 Salvador was the nation’s busiest port. A significant portion of the sugar from the northeast and gold and diamonds from the mines in the southeast passed through Salvador. It was a golden age for the town; magnificent homes and churches resplendent in gold decoration were built. Many of the city’s baroque churches, private homes, squares, and even the hand-chipped paving bricks have been preserved as part of Brazil’s historic patrimony. In Salvador, more than anywhere else in the country, the African influence in the makeup of Brazilian culture is readily visible, from the spicy dishes still called by their African names (caruru, vatapa, acaraji), to the ceremonies of candomblé which honor both African deities and Catholic holidays, to the capoeira schools where a unique African form of ritualistic fighting is taught. Its population is around 2,250,000 inhabitants.

Location: Salvador, Bahia, Brazil

Photographer: Celso Marino

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For the past few months I’ve been experimenting with trying out the hand techniques I learnt in Ghana on a monofilament warp. This was to highlight the structure of the woven fabric with the use of clear yarn - and I ended up with some interesting pieces! Since setting up the dobby loom I’ve continued exploring this avenue, making more similar pieces with added embroidery inspired by woven cloth from Mali and Guinea-Bissau.

I love the combination of using a clear warp with silks from Iran - a mix of natural and synthetic, traditional hand techniques mixed with utilising the capabilities of a 16 shaft loom and the added embroidery gives the piece an added layer cultural references.

Next up I’ll be making some cushions for sale, but will be definitely working on some more of these monofilament pieces too :)

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On this day in music history: February 10, 1987 - “Yo! Bum Rush The Show”, the debut album by Public Enemy is released. Produced by The Bomb Squad and Bill Stephney, it is recorded at Spectrum City Studios in Hempstead, L.I., NY from Mid - Late 1986. Originally known as Spectrum City and formed in 1982, the group is organized while Chuck D is a student at Adelphi University. Changing their name to Public Enemy, the groups concept is taken further with addition of DJ Terminator X, Minister Of Information Professor Griff and the S1Ws (aka Security Of The First World). P.E. tempers their music with a strong pro-black message, addressing issues affecting African American youth, and influenced by leaders including Malcolm X and the minister Louis Farrakhan. Powered by Chuck D’s strong lyrical delivery (aided and abetted by sidekick Flavor Flav) and The Bomb Squads innovative use of samples, the album receives copious praise from both underground and mainstream press upon its release including Best Album Of The Year accolades from New Musical Express’ critics poll. It spins off two singles including “Public Enemy No. 1” and “You’re Gonna Get Yours”. The vinyl version is reissued as a 180 gram LP by UK reissue label Simply Vinyl in 2000, and as a standard weight vinyl LP by Universal Music Group in 2014. “Yo! Bum Rush The Show” peaks at number twenty eight on the Billboard R&B album chart,  and number one hundred twenty five on the Top 200.

<p>Beyoncé, Jay-Z, Rihanna, Blue Ivy, Drake, Nicki Minaj, Lil Wayne, J. Cole, Kendrick Lamar, Janelle Monae, Jidenna (some of Hip Hop royalty) meets Avatar: The Last Airbender with an African Influence</p>

jkr start trying to create more wizarding schools around the globe and frankly speaking… it’s a huge mess.

as a european woman, it seems she’s just giving generic names to the schools (castelobruxo - that means ‘wizardcastle’ in english - and mahoutokoro - ‘magic place’). so… is this really necessary? can’t she just let the people from these countries to imagine their own schools based in their own culture?

her ‘expanded’ universe seems rather eurocentric (japanese wizards are all about quidditch? really, madam?) and as a brazilian myself, reducing south america in one school - when brazil is the only country in latin america that does not speak spanish - is nonsensical.

actually it would make more sense to divide latin america in three schools: one for central america (with mayan inlfuences), one for south america (based on the inca empire) and one for brazil (based on our indigenous background - mostly tupi guarani - plus the european and african influences).

i’m just guessing if japanese and african people are also finding these new articles offensive and generic…

Cultural Appropriation: Past & Present
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By Glendon Francis and Blair Imani

Cultural appropriation is the harvesting of cultural practices, often for profit, combined with the taking credit for the culture and dismissing the people who created it and often suffered for it.

This phenomenon appears in many ways in the present whether it is Vogue Italia’s use of a non-Black model, Gigi Hadid, to depict the beauty of Black features or Marc Jacobs use of Black hairstyles like locs while failing to use any Black models to portray the look.

It goes without saying that the beauty of Black women and the African diaspora are important influences on the world of fashion. However due to anti-Blackness and misogynoir Black women rarely benefit from the presence of Black culture in the realm of fashion. A prominent example of this is the way “fleek” is used by multi-million dollar companies absent any acknowledgement of the term’s creator Peaches Monroee.

Cultural appropriation is not a new phenomenon. It’s history and present is inextricably linked with the history of colonization, imperialism, and white supremacy. The life history of Saartjie Baartman demonstrates the historic roots of the practice of cultural appropriation.

Saartjie Baartman was a South African native, born in 1789. At two years old her mother passed away and tragically her father passed away shortly thereafter. In adolescence, Saartjie was forced to sign a contract by Hendrik Cesars and William Dunlop to participate in a circus. Some historians assert that she wasn’t forced because she signed the contract, however we must remember that Saartjie was illiterate and enslaved.


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Humanity was not afforded to Saartjie even prior to this ordeal. At the circus, she was put on display and made to wear nude-coloured clothing adorned with feathers for the pleasure of others. She was forced to perform private shows for wealthy individuals and was ultimately forced into prostitution which led to her untimely demise.

Saartjie’s body, stature, and features were fetishized and later mimicked. Some say that women like Saartjie Baartman birthed the Victorian era. While the Victorian era was coined after Queen Victoria of England, the newly sought after physique very clearly resembles Saartjie’s natural figure.


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During this era, wealthy women began to wear uncomfortably tight corsets and tailored gowns which made their behind appear larger. It’s been said by many admirers of the Victorian era and historians that this era in fashion directly copied the rather unique physique of enslaved African women.

During this era, African women were simultaneously belittled and constantly demeaned for their voluptuous figures – not unlike modern day. The Victorian era trends were used to create direct replica of Black women’s innate and unique beauty.

Today’s fashion trends range from Bantu knots, full lips, box braids and locs. Black women sport these “trends” regularly as protective hairstyles and natural features but are deemed as undesirable or unprofessional while non-Black women are hailed as edgy or beautiful for engineering the same looks. 

Black women often discuss on the harms of appropriation, but are often silenced. The usual rebuttal is, “it’s just fashion.”

Essentially, it has never just been fashion, especially when society has been telling Black women that what they innately possess and do is unacceptable. It is unacceptable to mimic a culture while simultaneously silencing and oppressing the people from which the culture originated. 

Confession

I can’t stand when people honestly think MLK was only/mainly fighting for interracial dating, he was fighting for equality. It was much more then a black man feeling comfortable laying with a white woman. Then they have even more nerve to say “he died for this” so you’re meaning to tell me that a man that had a loving wife, beautiful young children & was 39 years old was willing to die? No. Death shouldn’t have been a consequence & equality should be a birth given right. 3 years after his “I have a Dream” speech Dr. King visited Marcus Garvey’s grave. The Pan African leader that influenced him & his parents, as well as Malcolm X & his family. After visiting Garvey’s grave he said “I Fear I May Have Integrated My People Into a Burning House” & once he started to realize what he was doing, he was murdered for it. So stop saying “he died for this” or “he gave his life” He didn’t “GIVE” his life, it was taken.

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The culture of the United States of America is primarily Western, but is influenced by African, Native American, Asian, and Polynesian cultures. It also has its own social and cultural characteristics, such as dialect, music, arts, social habits, cuisine, and folklore. The United States of America is an ethnically and racially diverse country as a result of large-scale migration from many countries throughout its history.[1]

Its chief early European influences came from English settlers of colonial America during British rule. Due to colonial ties with Britain that spread the English language, British culture, legal system and other cultural inheritances, had a formative influence. Other important influences came from other parts of Europe, especially Germany.[2]

Original elements also play a strong role, such as Jeffersonian democracy.[3] Thomas Jefferson’s Notes on the State of Virginia was perhaps the first influential domestic cultural critique by an American and was written in reaction to the views of some influential Europeans that America’s native flora, fauna, including humans, were degenerate.[3]

American culture includes both conservative and liberal elements, scientific and religious competitiveness, political structures, risk taking and free expression, materialist and moral elements. Despite certain consistent ideological principles (e.g. individualism, egalitarianism, and faith in freedom and democracy), American culture has a variety of expressions due to its geographical scale and demographic diversity. The flexibility of U.S. culture and its highly symbolic nature lead some researchers to categorize American culture as a mythic identity;[4] others see it as American exceptionalism.

It also includes elements that evolved from Indigenous Americans, and other ethnic cultures—most prominently the culture of African Americans, cultures from Latin America, and Asian American cultures. Many American cultural elements, especially from popular culture, have spread across the globe through modern mass media.

The United States has traditionally been thought of as a melting pot. However, beginning in the 1960s and continuing on in the present day, the country trends towards cultural diversity, pluralism, and the image of a salad bowl instead.[5][6][7] Due to the extent of American culture, there are many integrated but unique social subcultures within the United States. The cultural affiliations an individual in the United States may have commonly depend on social class, political orientation and a multitude of demographic characteristics such as religious background, occupation and ethnic group membership.[1]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Culture_of_the_United_States

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The fact that this two are touring together is amazing. Started learning more about jidenna (classic man)  and he has much in common with stromae. His father is originally from Nigeria and his music has African influence. 

“That’s all I want to do. Make music that you can party and ponder to at the club. It doesn’t have to be hella deep, but it just has to mean something, that’s all. And that’s what I believe I’m doing…I want to create a whole different genre.” — Jidenna

“I’m not making music for intelligent people or dumb people. I’m just making music for people. If you want to dance to it, dance, if you want to think about it, think. Or you can think and dance at the same time.” — Stromae