african influences

washingtonpost.com
His Paula Deen takedown went viral. But this food scholar isn’t done yet.
Michael Twitty’s mission: To evangelize about the African roots of Southern food.

Wow this guy is amazing uhhhhhh uhhhhhh such awesome work

-blogger at Afroculinaria.com

“Twitty is deeply engrossed in both the African American and Jewish food traditions. “Blacks and Jews are the only peoples I know who use food to talk about their past while they eat it,” says Twitty, 38.”

“From Richmond it was a short jaunt to Colonial Williamsburg, where Twitty spent the week lecturing, conducting training sessions and cooking in period costume at three of the living history museum’s venues. In all his talks, Twitty emphasized the impact of chefs and cooks of African descent on shaping American and Southern cuisines in colonial times and after.”

“At a conference he met the scholar Robert Farris Thompson, author of “Flash of the Spirit,” a book about the influence of African religions on African American art that helped him see that “soul food” was, among other things, a spiritual term describing a mystical connection between humans and the animals and plants they eat.”

“He cooked and he gardened. He studied heirloom seed varieties, some that had been brought from Africa and some that had been carried from the New World to Africa and then, on slave ships, back to North America, among them okra, black-eyed peas, kidney and lima beans, Scotch bonnet peppers, peanuts, millet, sorghum, watermelon, yams and sesame. He called those seeds “the repositories of our history” and wrote about them in a monograph published by Landreth Seed in its 2009 catalogue.”

“Twitty’s embrace of all the various parts of himself — African, African American, European, black, white, gay, Jewish — sometimes raises hackles, as does his habit of speaking his mind. An article he wrote in the Guardian on July 4, 2015, suggesting that American barbecue “is as African as it is Native American and European, though enslaved Africans have largely been erased” from its story, elicited scorn and worse: Many commenters were outraged by his idea of barbecue as cultural appropriation.”

Celebrating African-American Social Dance

This is the Bop. The Bop is a type of social dance. Dance is a language, and social dance is an expression that emerges from a community. A social dance isn’t choreographed by any one person. It can’t be traced to any one moment. Each dance has steps that everyone can agree on, but it’s about the individual and their creative identity Because of that, social dances bubble up, they change, and they spread like wildfire. They are as old as our remembered history.

In African-American social dances, we see over 200 years of how African and African-American traditions influenced our history. The present always contains the past. And the past shapes who we are and who we will be.

Now, social dance is about community and connection; if you knew the steps, it meant you belonged to a group. But what if it becomes a worldwide craze? Enter the Twist.

It’s no surprise that the Twist can be traced back to the 19th century, brought to America from the Congo during slavery. But in the late ‘50s, right before the Civil Rights Movement, the Twist is popularized by Chubby Checker and Dick Clark. Suddenly, everybody’s doing the Twist: white teenagers, kids in Latin America, making its way into songs and movies. Through social dance, the boundaries between groups become blurred.

The story continues in the 1980s and '90s. Along with the emergence of hip-hop, African-American social dance took on even more visibility, borrowing from its long past, shaping culture and being shaped by it. Today, these dances continue to evolve, grow and spread.

Why do we dance? To move, to let loose, to express.

Why do we dance together? To heal, to remember, to say: “We speak a common language. We exist and we are free.”

From the TED-Ed Lesson The history of African-American social dance - Camille A. Brown

Camille A. Brown is a choreographer fusing dance and social commentary to explore race, sexuality and femininity.

Title Design by Kozmonot Animation Studio 

yes i get that the idea of pre-modern Europe being totally what you’d consider ‘white’ by modern standards is false and should be dismantled. i mean we should totally talk about how the Roman Empire was very much a multiethnic civilisation with North African and Middle-Eastern influences and existed with completely different race categories altogether. we should consider how empires we often regard today as non-European like the Islamic caliphates, the Achaemenid Empire (aka Iran) and Ottoman Turkey influenced what we now consider to be ‘Western civilisation’. or consider how Christianity is ultimately a religion of Middle-Eastern origin. we should remember that modern constructs of whiteness are exactly that- modern. they were not perpetual. 

but i can’t completely get on board with the way people often only fixate on US-centric race categories to present Europe as diverse. there are numerous European ethnic minorities who you might consider ‘white’ in the US who have historically faced erasure and genocidal violence at the hands larger and more powerful European countries. diversity in the European context is very much about representing ethnic diversity too. 

by all means, I understand the term POC has some validity if you’re addressing say, a US-based game developer or a US movie studio making a Hollywood movie when they start saying things like ‘premodern europe was all white’. but all the same, the way racism and exclusion has occurred in Europe has very often been about ethnic faultlines. things like antisemitism, a very old European prejudice, just do not fit simply into a white/POC dichotomy. so i can’t help but feel the way the term ‘POC’ gets flung around carelessly in that context is subtle US cultural imperialism, because this is also kind of implicitly predicated on the idea that whiteness as it is understood in the US exists the same way in various European countries.

 What is annoying me about Lúcio representation in Overwatch lately is this:

I saw it around here and on twitter non-brazilians cheering this small bit of Lore but for me it’s “Ah a stereotype”.

It’s just Blizzard sweeping under the rug they changed Lúcio nationality before the game released, because who knows? maybe they noticed they didn’t have any character that could represent Latin America.

I said it and I’ll say it again: He doesn’t represent Brazil. He doesn’t have any skins that ties to Brazil’s culture. BRAZIL’S CUTURE, NOT STEREOTYPES.

Yeah, soccer is a national sport, but you can’t tell a story about an entire nation through a sport. A sport that was brough here by a brazilan guy when he visited England back in 1800.

You simply cannot.

Then we have a bit of his background and his relationship with Symmetra that instead of cement who he is, actually make us look at his design with that feeling of “can’t relate”.

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Ed Sheeran: Up All Night With Pop's Hardcore Troubadour | Full Rolling Stone Interview

“Let’s go to my place for the finale!” Ed Sheeran shouts as he hops into an SUV. It’s just after midnight in London. Sheeran spent much of the evening in a bar, but even with his bright-red hair hidden under a ball cap, people started to recognize him. The DJ played one of his songs, and his friends had to create a wall around him so he could drink in peace. It all made him a little anxious, which is why we’re speeding to his West London home to keep the party going.

Sheeran is celebrating tonight because he knows he’s about to score his first Number One hit in America with “Shape of You,” a sleek, funky stomper from his new album, ÷ (pronounced Divide). We’re joined by his girlfriend, Cherry, and his old friends Zack, Nathan and Catherine, who have been watching him perform since he released his first album, The Spinning Man, when he was 13. “I went plywood,” Sheeran, now 25, jokes about that LP. “Not gold. I sold 100 copies.”

Sheeran has been going hard tonight: espresso martinis and rum-punch shots at dinner, gin and tonics at the bar. It’s my birthday, and at one point he grabs my phone, takes a selfie of us and posts to my Instagram, writing “It’s my birthday bitches #london #hashtag #believe #achieve #inspiration.” He encourages friends to knock back pints with a drinking song that ends “Na na na na/Hey hey hey/You’re a cunt!”

Soon, we arrive at his house, a five-floor, industrial-style space with brick walls, wood floors and several personal touches: a Charmander Pokémon stuffed animal in his bedroom and a bong shaped like Benny Blanco’s head in the living room. There’s also a recording studio, a gym and a full bar, where he recently entertained several young cast members of his favorite show, Game of Thrones. As we arrive, Sheeran offers bedrooms to anyone who wants to “get rowdy,” then goes to work mixing drinks.

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African Influence in Salvador

Salvador, capital of the state of Bahia, was the first major port and the capital of colonial Brazil for almost two centuries. The city lies between green tropical hills and broad beaches along the bay of Todos os Santos. It was built on two levels with administration buildings and residences constructed on the hills; forts, docks, and warehouses on the beaches. To this day the city is still divided into upper and lower cities. From 1500 to 1815 Salvador was the nation’s busiest port. A significant portion of the sugar from the northeast and gold and diamonds from the mines in the southeast passed through Salvador. It was a golden age for the town; magnificent homes and churches resplendent in gold decoration were built. Many of the city’s baroque churches, private homes, squares, and even the hand-chipped paving bricks have been preserved as part of Brazil’s historic patrimony. In Salvador, more than anywhere else in the country, the African influence in the makeup of Brazilian culture is readily visible, from the spicy dishes still called by their African names (caruru, vatapa, acaraji), to the ceremonies of candomblé which honor both African deities and Catholic holidays, to the capoeira schools where a unique African form of ritualistic fighting is taught. Its population is around 2,250,000 inhabitants.

Location: Salvador, Bahia, Brazil

Photographer: Celso Marino

Some really cool bits from Vanity Fair's Interview with Orlando Jones, re: American Gods and Anansi
  • VF: In your “Coming to America” intro, you get to wander in between some accents and dialects as you’re giving all the different angles of this African and African-American experience. Can you talk about some of the vocal choices you made there?
  • OJ: For me, one of the interesting things about American Gods is the way the world is laid out: it’s the old gods versus the new gods. Because Anansi is a trickster god, for me, his speech definitely had to have some African element to it—some patois. It was key that at certain moments, particularly when communicating on a slave ship full of Africans who are soon to be sold at market, he communicate in a tone that is familiar to them. That’s just the nature of communication.
  • I was just mindful that the patois, Gullah, all those were a part of those different languages that morphed from African under the American influence. The gentleman that plays the slave that’s praying to and summons Anansi, he does so obviously speaking in an African dialect. To not lean towards that worship is really to divorce yourself from everything American Gods is about, because the problem of the old gods is they’ve lost their following, they’ve lost their worshipers. It was a way to do that. Without speaking African, in an African accent or an African language, that was a way to do it.
  • VF: One of the very fun things about Mr. Nancy in that scene is that partway through, and all of a sudden, he’s got a spider for a head. I was told they went through many, many different spider designs before they landed on the one. Did you get to be a part of the process? What are your spider thoughts?
  • OJ: Bryan and Michael were awesome. A lot of show-runners don’t necessarily include the cast in those decisions, but they sent the design to me and were like, “We really want to know what you think about this spider.” The spider was three different colors—the red and the green—and it had these whiskers. These jowls.
  • That’s what I was hoping for, because I wanted him to have this hair on his face and this crazy hair on the top inspired by a lot of South African street fashion, which I think is the most interesting street fashion in the game right now. It’s very colorful. It’s very in-your-face, but at the same time, it’s super-elegant. I had been flipping through spiders, and I’d seen the yellow gloves that Anansi was supposed to have, and I couldn’t figure out how that was going to work because I felt like that would be so distracting. I was happy when Michael and Bryan were like, “No, let’s just do this.” But then I thought the visual-effects bill on this was going to be ridiculous.
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For the past few months I’ve been experimenting with trying out the hand techniques I learnt in Ghana on a monofilament warp. This was to highlight the structure of the woven fabric with the use of clear yarn - and I ended up with some interesting pieces! Since setting up the dobby loom I’ve continued exploring this avenue, making more similar pieces with added embroidery inspired by woven cloth from Mali and Guinea-Bissau.

I love the combination of using a clear warp with silks from Iran - a mix of natural and synthetic, traditional hand techniques mixed with utilising the capabilities of a 16 shaft loom and the added embroidery gives the piece an added layer cultural references.

Next up I’ll be making some cushions for sale, but will be definitely working on some more of these monofilament pieces too :)

vintamatsurii  asked:

What is everyone favorite genre of music???? Also i hope you all are having a nice day ☀☀

Ok so we are noobs when it comes to music genres so bear with us

(We only wanted to do a few but whoops guess this is everyone)

Sebastien - Hiphop / kpop-hiphop

Elia - Musical /bollywood

Ronnie - pop (boyband) / latin pop / that person who starts playing xmas music in october

Drew - 80s / boyband

Pam - African/caribbean influenced music / disco

Radha - emo

Amou - 90s rap

Tiponi -singer songwriter /musical

Raahim - singer songwriter / kpop

Matisse - videogame/movie scores / former emo music kid

Tehani - electronic

Adrien and Medhi - kpoopers 4 lyfe

Gio - R&B

Dev - Vaporwave / those jazzy hiphop songs

Alair and Atoine - (old school) rock

Pierre - Beyonce

-JJ

Originally posted by excessivephoto-blog

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Novo Mundo, in english New World (2016) tv series

In 1817, the archduchess of Austria, Maria Leopoldina is coming to Brazil to wed the prince Dom Pedro, son of king João VI
Fictional characters will also take part in the series, mainly the Portuguese teacher of Leopoldina, Anna Millman and the decadent actor, Joaquim Martinho.
New World will retract the construction of nowadays Brazil and the european, native and african influence in it’s culture. The tv show will be set during the last six years of João VI ruling in Brazil (1817-1822)

Revelation (Hamilsquad x Reader)

A/N: Hey, my babies. Mama is home!! I just want to thank you all once again (WE HIT 1K) and remind y’all of the AskHam happening tomorrow. You can hit my inbox up with asks starting tonight and I’ll get started tomorrow (or tonight if I get too excited to wait). I have been working on this request for the LONGEST TIME…I am excited to share it. I do think it could be better but…here it is anyway! Let me know what you think?

Warning(s): Cursing; A bit of sauciness; A bit of Google translated French

WC: 2265+

Relevant Fact: The Alvin Ailey School of Dance (located in New York) was founded by choreogrpaher Alvin Ailey in 1969 and their dance numbers are heavily influenced by African-American spirituals, sermons and gospel. 

Links: These videos were used as inspiration and are not mine: Fix Me Jesus and Needed Me


I stand in the wings of the stage, my nerves all over the place. It’s almost time for my duet with Tony and I am about to panic. It’s the first part of the show, “Pilgrim of Sorrow”, and Tony and I are doing the “Fix Me Jesus” portion of the song. I don’t doubt that he and I can successfully execute this duet with minimal error, we’ve been practicing for weeks. I’m just afraid of what my boys will think.

This is their first time seeing me dance. They know that I do dance heavily influenced by African-American spirituals, sermons, gospel and things of that nature, but they don’t know what all of that exactly entails. Besides…I didn’t exactly tell them that I was doing a duet. Knowing them, this may not end well.

The song before ours ends and the stage goes black, giving us just enough time to get into position. The lights go up and the song begins. Luckily, the house is dark so I can’t see into the audience. My mind goes completely blank and I focus on Tony and I’s movements.

The dance itself is slow. Not in a sensual way, but in a way that is technical but graceful. Our bodies seem to depend on each other for each movement we make. The dance is an act of teamwork so there has to be some level of chemistry and comfort. For the message of this song to resonate, it must be as if we are one. The different moves we make carry an emotion that we have to focus to get across.

When it gets to the part I am sure the boys will hate, I don’t hesitate in executing it fully. When Tony hinges backward I do the same and he walks backward on his hands, guiding me into a sitting position. I reach upward, as if trying to grasp at something, then Tony pushes me upward. My right leg is on relevé and the left is extended upward.

Tony spins me around slowly until I am facing him and he lays back, suspending me in the air with his arms still on my waist and his legs holding mine up. I contract into him twice before rising up and kicking backward. After that, the rest of the song goes by fairly quickly for me, as does the rest of the show, and the next thing I know I am being shoved into a yellow dress and hat for the last three numbers.

We breeze through them and the final bows are taken. When the curtains close we all file off the stage and pack for home. We congratulate each other and tease each other and say farewell until practice next week. Upon exiting the backstage area and entering the lobby, a few people linger to ask for autographs.

One woman in particular says–

“Oh! The chemistry was visible, honey! I loved it! Is there anything going on between you and that young man,” she gushes. “I could swear there is! So much chemistry! I loved it, I really did.”

I smile at her kindly and sign her program. “I’m glad you enjoyed the show, ma’am. That means so much.”

She gives me a quick hug before running over to Keiley, the umbrella bearer for “Wade in the Water” and talking her ear off. I send her a small smile and shrug when she looks over to me with wide eyes. When I turn around, my boys are standing there. I give them a tired smile.

“Hey, guys. You ready to–”

I am cut off by Tony jumping on my back.

“I know good and damn well you weren’t leaving without telling me bye were you?”

I shove him off of me, chuckling. “Piss off, Tony. I see you every day. But hey, let me introduce you.”

He throws an arm over my shoulder as I introduce him to my boys.

“This Hercules, John, Alex, and Lafayette,” I say, smiling. “They’re my boyfriends.”

“Nice to meet you all,” Tony says, stretching his hand out. However, the boys just stare at him menacingly. Silent hostility rolls off of them in waves. Tony awkwardly places his hand at his side. “Tough crowd.”

I frown. “Yeah…well, you better get back to Sasha,” I say, pulling him into a hug. “See you next week.”

“Sure thing, sugar,” He says, hugging me back quickly before skipping off.

I turn back to the boys, my face turned up in confusion and annoyance.

“What’s with you guys? That was so rude,” I say, placing a hand on my hip. “Tony is a cool guy.”

“Let’s go,” Alexander grits out, taking my dance bag. I scowl, taking the bag back.

“What the hell is up with you,” I say. I glance at the boys. Their faces are stone cold. “What the hell is up with all of you?”

“Let’s go,” Alex says sharply, snatching the bag from me. He turns on his heel and exits the building, then John takes the other bag and follows him. Hercules and Lafayette escort me out of the dance hall behind them. I am placed in the backseat between Herc and Laf as John and Alex put my things away. When everyone is in the car, I immediately start trying to defuse the situation.

“Guys–”

“Save it,” John snaps. I roll my eyes, crossing my arms.

“You guys are being childish.”

“Childish? No,” Alex says, starting the car and peeling out of the parking lot. “We’re pissed, sweetheart. Fucking pissed.”

“Over what? I come off of the stage after a performance and you guys don’t even tell me if it was good or not. You just snap at me. If anyone should be pissed, it’s me,” I retort.

“How would you feel if some girl were all me at one of my shows,” Lafayette snaps. “And then sauntered up right in front of you after the show and was all over me then too?”

“So you guys are jealous. Oh my fucking–”

“Why would we be jealous? Just because some attractive guy was all over our girlfriend? Nah, we aren’t jealous,” John says sarcastically.

“Oh my God, guys! Come on. It isn’t that big of a deal! It was just a duet.”

“So why didn’t you tell that woman that there was nothing going on? When she asked, why didn’t you tell her that it was ‘just a duet’,” Hercules asks. His voice is low and steady. He is fucking livid.

“I don’t have to answer to some woman I barely know. Besides, if you were paying attention, the woman was talking a mile a minute.”

“No excuse. You should’ve said something! We came out to support you tonight, not to see you cuddled up with some dancer dude,” Alex nearly shouts.

“Don’t you dare fucking yell at me, Alexander Hamilton. I did nothing wrong,” I say, my anger rising. “It’s you all flying off of the handle over nothing. If you would let me explain–”

“Ne pas. There is no need,” Laf cuts in. “We know what we know.”

“But–”

“Leave it alone,” Herc says sternly. “You’ve done enough.”

I look up to him in disbelief. If anyone were to be on my side, I thought it would be Hercules. I glare at him before staring down at my lap in anger.

The rest of the car ride is silent.

When we get home, the boys file into the house with me behind them. Once inside, however, I storm past them and head for my room. Alexander grabs my arm.

“Where are you going? We need to talk.”

I snatch my arm from him. “Don’t grab me like that, Alexander. Besides, now you wanna hear what I have to say?”

“Yes,” Laf chimes in. “We want to know what’s going on with you and the danseur. Vous deux avez la chimie. Why is that?”

“It doesn’t matter why we have chemistry. What matters is that you guys don’t trust me,” I snap. “I tried to tell you what was up in the car but you weren’t hearing it. I’m done.”

“Baby, please,” John says, his voice seeimgly calm.

“Don’t ‘baby’ me. I wasn’t your baby when you were talking at me in the car now was I,” I say, crossing my arms. “All I wanted was for you all to see me do what I do and be proud!”

Each of them hung their heads, hopefully feeling properly chastised. I sigh.

“Don’t worry about coming to the next show,” I say, turning around and exiting the room.


When I wake up the next day, it’s to the sound of our house bumping with music.

“What the hell,” I mutter as I slip on some pants and a bra and pad into the living room. I nearly die when I see the boys dancing to “Pon De Replay” with none other than Tony leading them through a simple routine. I shake my head, chuckling at the sight before me.

Hercules notices me first and grins, pausing the music.

“Why the fuck did you pause the music in my rehearsal, Mr. Mulligan,” Tony says, turning around. Noticing me, he smiles. “Oh, hey, girl. What’s good?”

“You tell me,” I say with a small smile. “What is this, guys?”

John steps forward. “Well…we felt bad about last night…,” He starts.

“So we got a hold of Tony and asked him to teach us some moves to make it up to you,” Lafayette finishes.

“We’re really sorry, baby,” Hercules adds.

“Really. We were acting like jackasses last night,” Alex says. “Mostly me.”

“I see…well. Make it up to me. Show me what you’ve got boys,” I say, taking a seat on the couch. Tony switches the song to “Can We Dance”.

I’m not sure what I was expecting but their routine is absolutely wonderful! The moves aren’t complicated but they are certainly more advanced than I would’ve thought they could handle. Tony taught them well! During one part of the song, the boys got a chance to showcase their own moves. It was clear that John was the most comfortable up there dancing but the others were great as well.

By the end of their mini-performance, I was grinning from ear to ear.

“So,” Alex says breathlessly. “What did you think?”

I look between each of the boys, watching their nerves build as I form my next words.

“I loved it,” I squeal. “Oh my gosh! It was so freaking cute!”

“Hold on, cute? My choreography was cute? I know not,” Tony complains, giving me bitch face.

“Lose the ‘tude, peasant,” I say, standing. “Yeah, it was cute.”

Tony purses his lips. “‘Ight. Since my shit was cute, why don’t you show your boys something hot?”

“Sit down, boys,” I say, glaring playfully at Tony.

They scramble to the couch. Tony smirks, changing the song.  “Needed Me” starts blaring through the speakers. I smirk back, turning to my boys as I start the number. I won’t lie, I did way more than what Tony taught in class a while back. But what can I say? I wanted to make them squirm in their seats.

Let’s just say that by the end of the song, the boys were in a rush to get Tony out of the front door.

“I am going! I’m going damn! I get all of you laid and fix your relationship and this is the thanks I get,” Tony shouts as he’s shoved to the door. “Oh my! Herc you’ve got quite the p–”

John slams the door in his face before he can finish that sentence.

“Well. I’m gonna go shower,” I say walking away.

“Oh no, Princess. You’re not going anywhere,” Hercules says, stalking towards me. The others follow suit, their eyes lustful. My eyes widen and I take off down the hallway.

“Get her!”

I turn the corner, hoping to make it to the bathroom before–

“Gotcha!”

“Aw man,” I whine, as John drags me back into the living room. He flops me on the couch and my boys gather in front of it, looking down at me.

“Tell us where you learned to dance like that, kitten,” Alex says.

My eyes flit between the four of them, not sure if I should answer or not.

“Speak up, babygirl,” John says. “He asked a question. We know you didn’t learn that at Alvin Ailey.”

I bite my lip. “Tony taught me the routine,” I say quietly. Laf looks confused.

“Tony?”

“Yeah…he and his boyfriend, Sasha, choreograph almost all of our hip hop routines. I do some and Keiley does some. We have another dance team outside of Ailey.”

“Hold on, Princess, you mean to tell me that Tony was gay this entire time?”

“I knew he was checking me out,” John exclaims. I laugh.

“Oh yeah, Tony is hella gay. I was the first person he came out to.  That’s why we’re so close.”

“Ohh,” They all say, their eyes widening with realization. They murmur amongst themselves about the turn of events and I try to slip away quietly. I almost make it around the corner but alas, the universe is against me today.

“Not so fast, little girl,” Laf says, pulling me to the middle of the floor before returning to the couch. Hercules flips on the stereo and takes a seat by Alex. John saunters over to me, a smirk playing at his lips.  

“Let’s give them another show, babygirl. Dance with me,” he whispers.

Onlookers watch a parade during the Feast of Saint James the Apostle in Loíza, Puerto Rico.

The municipality of Loíza is home to Puerto Rico’s largest concentration of black islanders. Legend says that the original town was named after one of the last female Taino cacique’s of the time named Yuiza. She is said to have become the lover of a black conquistador called Pedro Mejías, in order to protect her people. Pedro Mejías is one example of a number of free-African men who lived in Europe at the start of colonization, was baptized, and joined the Spaniards in expeditions and later invasions of the Caribbean. Historical records show that most of the original population of Loíza descended from enslaved Yoruba’s brought to Puerto Rico by the Spaniards, but also maroons and free-blacks from British colonies who had ended up in Puerto Rico. A royal decree by Spain in the seventeenth century, stated that the latter two groups were permitted to settle in Loíza as a way to defend Puerto Rico from British invasion; given that it was the islands weakest border of defense. 

Loíza is home to a large variety of Afro-Puerto Rican: dances, religious practices, cuisine, festivities, and other forms of cultural expression. The most popular festival is that in honor of St. James the Apostle, during the festivities African-influenced rituals and masks are present in celebrations. The Afro-Cuban syncretic religion Lucumí, which blends Yoruba and Catholic traditions together, has a large following in this particular area. Another popular African derived religion is the Congo-based Palo religion, with much older roots in Puerto Rico than Lucumí. Palo was directly brought to Puerto Rico by the Africans of modern day Congo and Angola; among the last group of enslaved people from that region was a man named Meliton Congo who later settled in Loíza. In 1914 the anthropologist, J. Alden Mason, interviewed Meliton who reported on a number of Kongo-based traditions found among the local population. Most notable was in the bomba; Puerto Rico’s traditional genre of African-based music and dance. Meliton noted that many of the songs were sang in a mixture of his native tongue Kikongo and Spanish.

The Appropriation of Black Culture in K-Pop/K-Hiphop

Okay so if you don’t know, a lot of k-pop and k-hip hop has a lot of African American influence in it. When I show music videos to my parents they are surprised at how black culture has expanded all over the world now.

But there is a difference between influence and Appropriation. There are a lot of black k-pop/hip hop fans, and we love to see how our culture influences others. But sometimes people cross the line.

For example earlier today FOMO Daily posted a video of Rae Sremmurd vs MOBB. Although I didn’t watch the video I read the comments. A lot of people were mad at how people get uncomfortable/upset when non-black people wear dreads. A lot of people tried to explain the reasoning but some people just weren’t understanding.

Yes, black people are going to get upset when non-blacks wear dreads, braids, etc. We as a people have always been made fun of for our big curly hair or our dreads, or our cornrows. We were told it looked nasty or unkept. But it those are ways we protect our hair from damage, etc. We are denied jobs for wearing our natural hair. We are discriminated against because of our hair. And just because you don’t see it happen or because it’s never happened to one of your black friends, that doesn’t mean it doesn’t happen. So when we see other people wearing it we’re gonna get pissed off. It’s not just a style that will come and go, it’s our culture. It’s like when people wear War Bonnets. That’s Native American culture not just a style. It’s disrespectful.

And going off of that, let’s talk about the word “nigga”. HELL YEA we’re gonna get pissed off when non-black people say it. Most people don’t even know the history of the word. During the slave trade people couldn’t pronounce the words “Nigeria” “Niger” and “Nigerian” so the word “Nigger” came about and was used as an offensive term towards blacks people. We took the word changed the spelling and gave it a new meaning. So no, if you’re not black don’t say “nigga”. How hard is it to refrain from saying one word??

There is a lot of controversy with idols saying “Nigga”. The only thing they have to do is apologize and admit they were wrong for saying it.

So we have no problem with the influence. In fact it’s very exciting and cool to see how our culture has touched all parts of the world. But there’s always a line that shouldn’t be crossed.

- From your fave unapologetically black admin, Zar 💕

<p>Beyoncé, Jay-Z, Rihanna, Blue Ivy, Drake, Nicki Minaj, Lil Wayne, J. Cole, Kendrick Lamar, Janelle Monae, Jidenna (some of Hip Hop royalty) meets Avatar: The Last Airbender with an African Influence</p>