african headdress

Cultural Appropriation (Knowing Before You Wear)

I don’t very much want to dawdle, so I’m just going to jump right into it.

I don’t care about the white girls wearing dreads or cornrows. I don’t care about it when they wear bindis or the saris, or their Native American headdresses bought off of some Etsy shop. No.

It pisses me off when these girls will wear the traditional Indian wear and not know SHIT about the cultural. They don’t understand the cultural significance and symbolism that accompanies what they call “feather hats”. They don’t know who Ida B Wells was, or the conflicting views between W.E.B Dubois & Booker T. Washington. They wear the cornrows and don’t know why African women and men started wearing them in the first place (a protective style). They’ll celebrate Cinco de Mayo and fetishize Latin - American women, but yet they turn their noses at the immigrants who come with their children to our country in hopes for a better life. They’ll mock the Middle Eastern woman in the mall for wearing her hijab, calling her a “terrorist”, yet they aren’t afraid to pose for the camera, making a mockery of Islam in their videos and their pictures.

They will wear their dreads, bantu knots, cornrows, box braids, etc. But don’t give a flying fuck about the black men and women who originally wore them. They’ll turn a blind eye to police brutality, oppression of People of Color, yet they sure will wear the Biggie & 2pac shirts to music festivals or on instagram or tumblr.

They love sushi & Chinese takeout, kimchi and all of the other delicacies within Asian cultures, but scream profanities at the immigrants escaping from poverty here.

They will wear our cultures, but they sure as hell don’t give a damn about the people who honor them.

WE’RE DOING THIS!

Pack West Wolfdog Rescue is a go! We won’t be official until the IRS gets back to us with proper documents and whatnot (this will take about 2 - 6 months), but I’ve secured funding from a friend (and fellow festival magic-maker) to get the gears turning. 

It only took selling Zenobia, my personal African lioness skin headdress, and I am surprisingly okay with that. The arrangement actually couldn’t be better: She goes to an amazing new home with a person who I know will love and cherish her (and who will probably wear her to a few of the festivals I vend at next summer, so we can be reunited on special occasions!), my friend gets to obtain a taxidermy piece he feels a deep connection to, and the Pacific Northwest gets a new wolfdog rescue! 

I will post more details about the group’s mission statement soon.