african future

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Dear Future Husband,

Please be prepared for our traditional wedding to be this L I T !

- Your Future Wife 😘

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T'Challa rolled up his sleeve, revealing a tattoo of an African Woman, her stomach being represented as earth. Bucky didn’t understand it, but smiled nonetheless.

“It’s cool.” Bucky told T'Challa who played with his gold crux anasata necklace. T'Challa laughed lightly.

“African women are the future, you know.” T'Challa said, the words of wisdom floating through the air. Bucky respected that. He nodded in agreement.

“I know.”

10

Kati Kati(2016) directed by Mbithi Masya

“Bereft of earthly memories, a new arrival in the afterlife struggles to recover the past, in this poetic fantasy that offers a dark reflection on personal atonement in the shadow of Kenya’s violent past

Imagine waking up one day in a barren wasteland. Amnesia leaves you clueless as to your whereabouts, your identity, and how you arrived. A small group of strangers welcomes you to a nearby oasis resort, and they reveal to you the nature of this new reality. You are dead. And this is the afterlife. This is what happens to Kaleche (Nyokabi Gethaiga) in the enigmatic opening sequence of Kati Kati, writer-director Mbithi Masya’s poetic first feature film.

Kaleche is a new arrival with no recollection of her life or death. A dozen other young Kenyans are all caught in the same eerie dormant state. They want for nothing; they simply write down whatever their heart desires and it appears at their bedside the next morning.

The group’s unofficial leader is Thoma (Elsaphan Njora), who is passionate about helping the dead remember and reconcile with their fragmented pasts. But Kaleche’s presence triggers a transformation in Thoma. Their mutual enchantment with each other unearths a sinister secret of his, forcing him to confront his own denial and pain.

Masya is one third of the alternative house-funk trio Just a Band, and his musical background clearly informs the film’s lyrical rhythms — to say nothing of the way the script by Masya and co-writer Mugambi Nthiga crescendoes to a climax. With echoes of Wings of Desire and After Life, Kati Kati offers a dark reflection on personal atonement in the shadow of Kenya’s past.”

5

Africology and African American Studies Graduation Ngoma Ceremony today! This is for mommy! Asé!

8

Consorting with my Ancestors. Burning incense. Embracing Oshún. Thanking the Lord for another day. Amen. Asé. #BlackGirlMagic

Transracial adoption first became a controversial issue in the early 1970s. A heated public debate occurred about the transmission of Afri­can American cultural identity to Black children adopted into White middle-class families. The central question in these debates was whether or not White parents were capable of teaching their children African American culture and history, and inculcating them with the skills necessary for Blacks to survive in the racially unequal United States. Con­cerns over the transmission of identity have shaped public opinion and social policies regarding racial matching between children and parents since the 1970s. Transracial adoption became a contentious public issue after the National Association of Black Social Workers (NABSW) released a position paper in 1972 stating their opposition to the practice, citing their concerns about racial identity and survival skills as the basis of their objections (NABSW 1972).

The Black social workers’ critique of the ways Black children were treated in the child welfare system was a contestation of state-sanctioned regulations determining which families African American children would become part of, and thus be socialized by. Their protests against transra­cial adoption were largely motivated by a concern for the futures of African American children and a desire to strengthen Black families, and were often politically grounded in Black nationalism. Policy changes re­flecting these concerns gradually occurred at the state, county, and agency levels. While standards varied in different regions, in most areas of the country adoption agencies became committed to the goal of racial matching whenever possible. Many states drew up regulations governing how long agencies could spend searching for same-race placements.


Transracial adoption receded from public debate later in the 1970s, and received very little media attention until the early 1990s when it once again became the subject of fierce public discussion. While argu­ments against this practice continued to focus on racial identity, the political context of the 1990s had changed. Whereas in the earlier debate attention was focused on the importance of racial matching between children and parents, in the current political climate the debate has led to new federal policies promoting “color-blind” adoptions by prohibiting the consideration of race in the adoptive placement of a child. The public discourse concerning this issue goes beyond the specificity of transracial adoptees’ lives. Indeed, this policy dialogue has implications for political struggles over teenage pregnancy, “ille­gitimacy,” and welfare reform.


While the current public dialogue is explicitly concerned with issues of race, the linkage of transracial adoption with welfare reform, tax credits to adoptive parents, and the termination of (birth) parental rights reveals a more implicit agenda focusing on women. In fact, the 1996 law was explicitly designed to combat “illegitimacy” among wel­fare recipients. In a political context dominated by proponents of tra­ditional “family values” as the solution to the supposed “breakdown of the family,” celebrations of adoption as a panacea to the “epidemic of illegitimacy” among “underclass” women and the misfortune of infertility among primarily middle-class heterosexual couples must be viewed critically. This political dialogue sounds disturbingly similar to early-twentieth-century eugenic prescriptions for strengthening the White race by limiting the reproductive capacities of “undesirables”— namely, Black women, immigrant women, “imbeciles,” and “im­moral” women. In the shifting political alliances and commitments of the 1990s and beyond, adoption has become a curious battleground on which the social meanings of race and identity, gender and family, work and poverty, culture and nation are being constructed, contested, and enforced.

—  Sandra Patton, Birthmarks: Transracial Adoption in Contemporary America (2000).
8

It has been a few months since I’ve posted. I’ve been teaching for the summer in California. I’m going back home to Philadelphia in a week and I’m moving to Atlanta in two weeks.

Android Oshún, the Africana WomaNINJA is back.

2

10/5/16

It’s Day 4 with this clever, clever bird, and he’s gotten a lot more vocal over the past couple of days.

An ongoing list of things he knows:

  • Various clicks and whistles
  • Dog barks
  • The Andy Griffith theme
  • His name.
  • Giggling.
  • Something that sound suspiciously like a fart noise. (He LOVES this one)
  • “Good boy!”
  • “Wooooo!”
  • “Quit it! >:I” (Which he uses to near-perfect context. Including when I’m bothering him.)
  • “Bye, Brutus!”
  • “Yup!” and “Yeah!”
  • “What?” or “What is it?”
  • “Come on.”
  • “Come here!”
  • “Pretty bird~” (Also “Brutus, pretty bird!” and “Pretty Brutus!”)
  • “Whatever. :I”
  • “Really? :I”
  • “Goodnight!”

And probably a lot more that’s being lost in his muttering and grumbling.